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Thread: Should Teachers Pay Be Linked To Student Grades

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pembroke_Corgi View Post
    Have you never heard of the social sciences? Still perfectly possible to use the scientific method and gather empirical data.

    True. Just read a interesting article on kids, teachers & genetics.
    How they are all part of the equation involved in the learning process.

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/36717876...and_parenting/
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  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by IRescue452 View Post
    Am I the only one who thinks the problem lies not in school, but in society as a whole? I learned to read when I was 3. Well before I started school. We didn't have cable, we didn't have playstation (though we did have atari), we didn't have cell phones or facebook or email to keep up on, we didn't go to the mall every other day. Both of my parents actually had time to sit down and read with us or do learning things. Now I have little sisters and they don't read or do math as well. They've got a single mother who has no time and they have a tv for a babysitter. They spend hours on the computer daily. This is just how society is now. We've got no time to devote to teaching children. No, machines do the work now. They don't have to learn anything. Its just that point in our culture's evolution where we can stop teaching math because computers do it for us, we can stop teaching reading because we have e-books that fit in our pockets and can read for us, we can stop teaching history and science and everything else because we have internet. Kids know this. They may not consciously choose this way of thinking, but they grew up in a time when they could refer to the internet if they needed an answer. The attitude of "why should I sit through school and learn the old-fashioned way" is built right in.
    I have always heard that the early readers, or talkers, or writers of their name, all pretty much balance out by the 5th grade. Like early walkers..not exactly a fortelling of great physical prowess. I am curious, what did you go on to do after that? AND- I don't mean that in any insulting way..just curious. Did you then go on to skip grades? Graduate from high school at 15? Graduate college at 18, etc.?

    I learned to read at a more "normal" time...and to this day, read, read and read- 4 books a week is not unusul for me. I love to read. I graduated college and law school at 'normal' times, enjoyed school ok in general, didn't do overly well, etc. But, I read like a fool.

    That is where my curiosity comes from. What did such an early start in reading do for you? Are you still an avid reader? I can remember, as a kid, literally- looking around me for cereal boxes to read at breakfast. I read the wall of stuff at J's school last night, while waiting for a parent's meeting to begin. I. Must. Read.
    But, I was not an early reader by any means.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pembroke_Corgi View Post
    Also, if I may share a big pet peeve of mine, it's that a lot of people think they are experts on education who have no training or background in it. Being a student and the study of pedagogy are very different things, and many teachers today are highly qualified to teach. Yes, parents know their kids best, but a good teacher will communicate with parents in order to help their students more. Teaching is based on science, not anecdotes or feelings or how we were taught as kids.
    I agree, completely. I am in no way, shape or form, an expert on education. I readily agree that while I know how to write, read, and learn...I have NO idea how to teach how to write, read and learn or , why to do it a certain way, etc.

    I do know my child best, but, that doesn't mean I know how or why to teach him best. That is prolly my biggest criticism of homeschooling. Frankly, I am not qualified to teach my child, from an educational standpoint, despite having plenty of education myself.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cataholic View Post
    I have always heard that the early readers, or talkers, or writers of their name, all pretty much balance out by the 5th grade. Like early walkers..not exactly a fortelling of great physical prowess. I am curious, what did you go on to do after that? AND- I don't mean that in any insulting way..just curious. Did you then go on to skip grades? Graduate from high school at 15? Graduate college at 18, etc.?

    I learned to read at a more "normal" time...and to this day, read, read and read- 4 books a week is not unusul for me. I love to read. I graduated college and law school at 'normal' times, enjoyed school ok in general, didn't do overly well, etc. But, I read like a fool.

    That is where my curiosity comes from. What did such an early start in reading do for you? Are you still an avid reader? I can remember, as a kid, literally- looking around me for cereal boxes to read at breakfast. I read the wall of stuff at J's school last night, while waiting for a parent's meeting to begin. I. Must. Read.
    But, I was not an early reader by any means.
    I don't think being an early reader give students an advantage per se, but research shows that being exposed to books, text, and lots of adult conversation gives students a big advantage in school. Kids who have a rich environment before school learn things like phonemic awareness and how print looks before they begin K, and tend to have larger vocabularies (in many cases this is true throughout academic careers).

    I agree with IRescue452 that too many parents just turn on the TV instead of helping their kids. Schools cannot (and should not) do everything. Parents actually need to do their job, too. I have a relative whose kid has reading comprehension problems that has been brought up repeatedly in conferences, and the parents do absolutely nothing to help him despite the fact the teacher has given them numerous tips, help, etc. They were also offered FREE tutoring twice a week after school and didn't take it because they didn't want to have to pick him up from school (1 mile away) instead of having the bus take him. That is just lazy and ignorant IMO. This is actually not that uncommon either in my experience. At what point are parents responsible for their own child's grades?

  5. #65
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    Ok - this is just a little off topic, but how does an adult get back into the reading mode?

    I was always an avid reader of just about anything. Loved reading in school, and it followed thru to my adult life. Even tho I was married, maintaining a household, working full time, and raising two kids, I always found time to read. If I found a book that really "grabbed me", it was nothing for me to read it in 1 or 2 days, and I'm not talking short stories either. Back in the 60's and 70's when book clubs were popular, I would get several books at a time, and have them read in no time flat. As the kids got older (teens), I found myself reading less and less, and now that I'm retired, I read hardly at all. My concentration really sucks, and I have 2 books sitting on my desk right now that I really want to read, but just can't get into it. I started one about 6 months ago, read 2 chapters, and haven't picked it up again - and it's a good book - not one that puts me to sleep. I'm going to have to start it again from the beginning when I do get to it!

    So do we get reading burnout???? It would seem that I have it. Any suggestions on how to cure it??
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  6. #66
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    ^^. Hmmmm.....assuming you do like to read, I might suggest you turn off the TV at night (LOL). That is my main distraction. It lets my mind 'go' without having to focus. I might also start with magazines- those that require a lot less time than a full scale book.

    But, really, all that could be way off base. Not reading is just not possible with me!

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cataholic View Post
    I do know my child best, but, that doesn't mean I know how or why to teach him best. That is prolly my biggest criticism of homeschooling. Frankly, I am not qualified to teach my child, from an educational standpoint, despite having plenty of education myself.
    As I see it, the most important thing a homeschooling parent must do is first know, then admit when they are over their head. Then, find and use the resources that are available to meet the need. Do some people home school because only they want to be the teaacher of their children? Sure. I do not think that is the correct attitude to have about it.

    We are going to home school our children because we believe it is our responsibility to do so. Plus, we can. Plus, they (eventually 'they' that is) will get an education that is better geared to their learning style.

    I am not sure if we covered it here, but what does 'qualified' mean anyway?
    "Unlike most of you, I am not a nut."

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    "If the enemy opens the door, you must race in."

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  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cataholic View Post
    Not reading is just not possible with me!
    And that's the way I used to be....

    I had thought about setting aside an hour (to start) each day just to read, but I don't want to feel like I have to read when that hour comes around. That would make it seem like a chore if I really didn't want to do it. The last time I really did any serious reading, was on a long and boring train trip. Unfortunately that's an expensive way to make time to read!

    Maybe I should subscribe to Reader's Digest. I've always enjoyed that and they have lots of good articles. I also like National Geographic. Not too keen on other magazines tho.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Wolfy ~ Fuzzbutt #3
    My little dog ~ a heartbeat at my feet

    Sparky the Fuzzbutt - PT's DOTD 8/3/2010
    RIP 2/28/1999~10/9/2012
    Myndi the Fuzzbutt - Mom's DOTD - Everyday
    RIP 1/24/1996~8/9/2013
    Ellie - Mom to the Fuzzbuttz

    To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven.
    Ecclesiastes 3:1
    The clock of life is wound but once and no man has the power
    To know just when the hands will stop - on what day, or what hour.
    Now is the only time you have, so live it with a will -
    Don't wait until tomorrow - the hands may then be still.
    ~~~~true author unknown~~~~

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by pomtzu View Post
    Ok - this is just a little off topic, but how does an adult get back into the reading mode?

    <snip>

    So do we get reading burnout???? It would seem that I have it. Any suggestions on how to cure it??
    Start easy. Short stuff.... Magazines and the like. Then, when you read something you like, read other stuff by the author. Or, if the article lists reference material, read that. OR, if you like reading commentary like I do, read the other sides stuff.

    From there, IMO, it develops into a thirst for more.
    "Unlike most of you, I am not a nut."

    - Homer Simpson


    "If the enemy opens the door, you must race in."

    - Sun Tzu - Art of War

  10. #70
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    Ellie, I just got a book that I thought I would like and I read it. Liked it so much I got another one. Now, I have to have my reading fix every day. Good luck!!


    I've been Boo'd...
    Thanks Barry!

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puckstop31 View Post
    As I see it, the most important thing a homeschooling parent must do is first know, then admit when they are over their head. Then, find and use the resources that are available to meet the need. Do some people home school because only they want to be the teaacher of their children? Sure. I do not think that is the correct attitude to have about it.

    We are going to home school our children because we believe it is our responsibility to do so. Plus, we can. Plus, they (eventually 'they' that is) will get an education that is better geared to their learning style.

    I am not sure if we covered it here, but what does 'qualified' mean anyway?
    I think people- in general- are composed of strenghts and weaknesses. Things the parent excels at, and doesn't excel at. I think I have strenghts that lie in areas other than teaching my own (or anyones, for that matter) child. I prefer to leave that up to people qualified. To me, qualified means qualified to teach, have a degree, certification, training, experience, etc. Yes, I recognize that there are "qualified" teachers that stink and have no business being around kids, and that there are "unqualified" people that excel at teaching. In fact, in some industries, there are "trainers". People that are not educationally diploma'd, that train employees. My SIL is one of them. Frankly, she is good at what she does, and has a four year degree in psych or soc, I think. Not education.


    In general, though, I like to believe that being "qualified" to teach means something. Perhaps I buy into the whole formal education thing a little bit too much.

  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cataholic View Post
    I think people- in general- are composed of strenghts and weaknesses. Things the parent excels at, and doesn't excel at. I think I have strenghts that lie in areas other than teaching my own (or anyones, for that matter) child. I prefer to leave that up to people qualified. To me, qualified means qualified to teach, have a degree, certification, training, experience, etc. Yes, I recognize that there are "qualified" teachers that stink and have no business being around kids, and that there are "unqualified" people that excel at teaching. In fact, in some industries, there are "trainers". People that are not educationally diploma'd, that train employees. My SIL is one of them. Frankly, she is good at what she does, and has a four year degree in psych or soc, I think. Not education.


    In general, though, I like to believe that being "qualified" to teach means something. Perhaps I buy into the whole formal education thing a little bit too much.
    I see where you are coming from. Indeed all people have strengths and weaknesses. Realizing this, I think, is a key to succcess in whatever endeavor you are doing.

    Also, I do understand the desire to be taught by a person 'qualified' to teach the subject being taught. Perhaps we will just have to disagree as to what qualified means. To me, a diploma, degree, certificate or whatever isn't worth the paper it is on if you cannot take that knowledge and actually accomplish the goal in the real world. For instance, part of my job has me interviewing candidates for IT tech positions in our company from time to time. These days we get hundreds of resumes. But come interview time, very few of them can actually offer realistic and client driven solutions.

    How this applies to my view of homeschooling is... Does the student learn the subject matter? Right now, Hannah is just starting the basics... ABC's, etc... Personally, I would be a very bad teacher of those things. My wife on the other hand, with her simple high school education, excels at it. She just has that nack for knowing how to explain things to her in a way that she seems to pick up. Eventually, she will get into things that I know I can teach her. Also, eventually, we will get to subject matter that neither of us can do. That's where the homeschooling groups around us come into play.


    ----

    This is a very interesting line of discussion BTW. We just happen to be doing the whole DISC assesment thing in our company right now. I came out a HIGH "D" and a VERY low "C". Shocker, I know. LOL My guess is, from what you shared here, is you would be pretty much opposite. That means, I think, that the process is as important to you as the results. Me? I could care less about the process as long as the job gets done.

    There is no right or wrong "answers" in the DISC process. Its just a way to learn how to talk to each other.

    As to education... For me, as in most things, I don't care about process, qualifications, etc... Just that the students learn. And for the most part, the homeschooling students in the groups I have been exposed to, do.
    "Unlike most of you, I am not a nut."

    - Homer Simpson


    "If the enemy opens the door, you must race in."

    - Sun Tzu - Art of War

  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puckstop31 View Post
    I see where you are coming from. Indeed all people have strengths and weaknesses. Realizing this, I think, is a key to succcess in whatever endeavor you are doing.

    Also, I do understand the desire to be taught by a person 'qualified' to teach the subject being taught. Perhaps we will just have to disagree as to what qualified means. To me, a diploma, degree, certificate or whatever isn't worth the paper it is on if you cannot take that knowledge and actually accomplish the goal in the real world. For instance, part of my job has me interviewing candidates for IT tech positions in our company from time to time. These days we get hundreds of resumes. But come interview time, very few of them can actually offer realistic and client driven solutions.

    How this applies to my view of homeschooling is... Does the student learn the subject matter? Right now, Hannah is just starting the basics... ABC's, etc... Personally, I would be a very bad teacher of those things. My wife on the other hand, with her simple high school education, excels at it. She just has that nack for knowing how to explain things to her in a way that she seems to pick up. Eventually, she will get into things that I know I can teach her. Also, eventually, we will get to subject matter that neither of us can do. That's where the homeschooling groups around us come into play.


    ----

    This is a very interesting line of discussion BTW. We just happen to be doing the whole DISC assesment thing in our company right now. I came out a HIGH "D" and a VERY low "C". Shocker, I know. LOL My guess is, from what you shared here, is you would be pretty much opposite. That means, I think, that the process is as important to you as the results. Me? I could care less about the process as long as the job gets done.

    There is no right or wrong "answers" in the DISC process. Its just a way to learn how to talk to each other.

    As to education... For me, as in most things, I don't care about process, qualifications, etc... Just that the students learn. And for the most part, the homeschooling students in the groups I have been exposed to, do.
    Actually, we are more in agreement than disagreement. I do put more emphasis on the end result as I do the process. But, I see a more direct correlation between the end result and the process used to achieve that end.

    Again, I do recognize that the process can turn out a useless product, and that a prized product can be a result of a haphazard process. In my world, it is unlikely, possible, but, unlikely.

    As for homeschooling, I have yet to meet a home schooled child that I couldn't pick out of the bunch. I have yet to meet a home schooled child that I would put on par with a more traditionally educated child as it relates to social adaption. Maybe that means I have limited interactions with the 'well rounded' homeschooler, only the more relgiously zealoused home schooler. I don't know. My experience is my experience.

    Interestingly enough, J is in a montessori program, not a traditional school program. You know, montessori...where the child is allowed to play with blocks in the corner all day long? The one progra that is used to teach the mentally challenged? (that is me poking fun at montessori...what I hear from othe people when they learn he is there).

    Finding what works best for your child should be at the fore. Not all things work for all kids. And, not all things that work at one age works at a later age.

  14. #74
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    I really think factory style schools are obsolete anyway. Kids nowadays know more about technology and access to information than their teachers do. Schools have to evolve to fit this century or the problems are just going to keep rolling in.
    "There are two things which cannot be attacked in front: ignorance and narrow-mindedness. They can only be shaken by the simple development of the contrary qualities. They will not bear discussion."

    Lord John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton

  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by IRescue452 View Post
    I really think factory style schools are obsolete anyway.
    Absolutely!! After students learn the basics they should ether go to vocational schooling or college prep schooling and the drop outs can tend counters at fast food joints/Wal Marts/Dead End Jobs. We could rebuild our work force if we stopped emphasising every runny nosed spoiled kid could be the POTUS and became realistic that some of us are better off working with our hands and some just arent suited for jobs that require any type of thinking whatsoever.

    Aptitude based learning after the basics have been learned.
    I have a HUGE SIG!!!!



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