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Thread: in heat

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    Canada
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    in heat

    It's been ages since I had a female puppy. Can someone please let me know at around what age will a puppy go into her first heat?

    Chow
    D

  2. #2
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    i have a golden retriever and she got in heat when she was about 10 mon. old. i don't know if different breeds have different ages.



    Thanks 4 the amazing blinkie and siggy,Joanofark!
    Thank u flamepony12 4 the cool avatar!

    Sassy is my 1 year old golden retriever.

    Shopping is an attitude... and I have an attitude problem.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Upstate NY
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    The larger the dog the earlier they go into heat, for the most part anyways. You always have the exception to every rule.

    Most dogs will go into heat between the ages of 5.5 months all the way up almost a year.
    Soar high & free my sweet fur angels. I love you Nanook & Raustyk... forever & ever.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Sask. Canada
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    depends on the dog lol Misty did not first go into season till right around the same time as her first birthday.
    Shayna
    Mom to:
    Misty-10 year old BC Happy-12 year old BC Electra-6 year old Toller Rusty- 9 year old JRT X Gem and Gypsy- 10 month ACD X's Toivo-8 year old pearl 'Tiel Marley- 3 year old whiteface Cinnamon pearl 'Tiel Jenny- the rescue bunny Peepers the Dwarf Hotot Miami- T. Marcianus

    "sister" to:

    Perky-13 year old mix Ripley-11 year old mix

    and the Prairie Clan Gerbils

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    Canada
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    digging holes and stealing items

    Thanks to all who responded. I think I will try this "own" hole thing. As for discipine, I just take or should I say, pick up the items and tell her "no". Unfortunately I do not see her do this, I just get the after effects. I have looked into obedience, but at this time some say she might be too young. I figured being she is going to be 6mo. this would be a good age..so I'm phoning around.

    As for the "heat" question, thanks again to all that responded. As said, it's been a long time since I had a female puppy. Our dogs were either male or spayed prior to getting them.

    Much appreciated for your feedback.
    Chow
    D

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Kelowna, BC
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    Since you have a German shepherd dog MIX, I see no point in letting her have a heat. Please spay her BEFORE her heat. If you let her go through her heat, her chances of cancer are so much greater. She can also get pyometra and die. My German shepherd died of cancer because my dad didn't spay her before her first heat.

    Besides improving her health, spaying her will make her less aggressive, and more well-behaved. She will not try to run away to find a mate, she will not get pregnant, she will eat less food, etc. Do not let her become a sexually frustrated dog who will take out her frustrations in destructive or aggressive ways. Spay her and she will be so much healthier and happier.
    I've been BOO'd!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Canada
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    spaying versus heat

    Thanks wolfsoul for your reply. I have every intention of spaying her before she goes into heat. We adopted Sadie from the pet store who in turn works with the SPCA and she has to be spayed. I was just wondering, actually hoping, she wouldn't come into heat before she is "schedule" to be spayed. As for the cancer and other disease's....is this "normal" for shepherds? We had a shepherd as kids, but that was it and I don't remember anyone telling us about being sick or worse. Is it mostly with female dogs? We've had dogs all our lives, but Sadie is our newest.
    Chow
    D

  8. #8
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    I don't think she's too young for training. Autumn went into obedience classes at 4 months and began her at home training at 14 weeks, the day after we got her.
    "There are two things which cannot be attacked in front: ignorance and narrow-mindedness. They can only be shaken by the simple development of the contrary qualities. They will not bear discussion."

    Lord John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton

  9. #9
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    I'm glad you are going to spay her! That's a wise and responsible decision. Cancer or pyometra (infection of the uterus) is open to all breeds.

    Shepherds ARE, however, a very unhealthy breed in general -- subject to hip and elbow dysplasia, skin disorders, cancer, bloat --- pretty much everything. You said before your dog is a GSD mix though, so there's a great chance she will be fine. Shepherds were pretty much ruined by bad breeding after the war, when everyone wanted one. They bred them very carelessly and that's why they often have health and temperment problems today. It's difficult to get a healthy specimen of a purebred GSD unless you go to a good, reputable breeder.

    Female dogs do have a higher chance of cancer than males from not being altered. Males can get testicular or prostate cancer, but it's not a huge chance whereas the chance with females is alot greater.
    I've been BOO'd!

  10. #10
    So much BS about spaying....You have no idea what you are talking about,or your like GB saying its such a benifit to make sure they cant reprocreate ..hmmm maybe we should start thinking not just dogs......

    We dont do it in europe and there is no difference in cancer or longetivity ,we just accept the extra hassle..you seem to be so abverse to any problems so called "loved ones?" Mybe caused
    by an overdose of WD flms, like Bambi ,lots of tears and no real commitment.

  11. #11
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    Originally posted by Maja
    So much BS about spaying....You have no idea what you are talking about,or your like GB saying its such a benifit to make sure they cant reprocreate ..hmmm maybe we should start thinking not just dogs......

    We dont do it in europe and there is no difference in cancer or longetivity ,we just accept the extra hassle..you seem to be so abverse to any problems so called "loved ones?" Mybe caused
    by an overdose of WD flms, like Bambi ,lots of tears and no real commitment.
    You are obviously very uneducated. And yes, altering IS practiced in Europe. You probably just don't know because you prefer to leave your dogs sexually frustrated. Who is GB???

    Health Problems due to leaving a dog INTACT.
    Mammary cancer: Estrogen is one of the primary causes of canine mammary cancer, the most common malignant tumor in dogs. Animals that are spayed prior to one year of age very rarely develop this malignancy. Spaying a dog before her first heat is the best way to significantly reduce the chance your dog will develop mammary cancer. The risk of malignant mammary tumors in dogs spayed prior to their first heat is 0.05%. It is 8% for dog spayed after one heat, and 26% in dogs spayed after their second heat.

    Tumors of the reproductive tract: Tumors can occur in the uterus and ovaries. An OHE would, of course, eliminate any possibility of these occurring.

    Uterine infections: Many female dogs have problems with a severe uterine disease called pyometra following their heat cycles. With this disorder, a normal three-ounce uterus can weigh ten to fifteen pounds and be filled solely with pus. Undetected, this condition is always fatal. Its treatment requires either the use of expensive hormonal and IV fluid therapy or an extremely difficult and expensive ovariohysterectomy. A normal spay costs between $100 and $200, while one done to correct a pyometra can easily cost $600 to over $1000, depending on complications. The strain on the kidneys or heart in some of these cases may be fatal or cause life long problems, even after the infected uterus has been removed.

    False pregnancy: Some bitches fail to routinely go out of their heat cycles correctly causing a condition we call 'false pregnancy.' In these cases, even though the bitch may not have mated with a male dog, her body believes it is pregnant due to some incorrect hormonal stimulations that it is receiving. The dog may just have some abdominal swelling and/or engorgement of the mammary glands, but in some cases, they will even make nests and snuggle with socks or toys against their bodies. These animals often experience no longterm serious problems, as the behavior disappears when the circulating hormones return to their appropriate levels. In others, we may see mastitis (infection of the mammary glands), metritis (infection of the uterus), or sometimes these cases develop into full-blown pyometras. We recommend spaying dogs that consistently have false pregnancies.

    Hair coat problems: In dogs, hair does not grow continuously as in people, but has a definite growing (anagen) and resting (telogen) phase. Estrogen, which is increased during estrus, retards or inhibits the anagen phase, so more hairs are in the telogen phase. These resting hairs are more easily lost because they are less firmly anchored. As a result, the hair coat on many dogs suffers because of estrogen surges that occur with heat cycles or whelping. Their coats appear thin and the underlying skin is exposed in many areas. It can take two to four months for the hair to return to normal. Additionally, there are a small number of female dogs that never develop a normal hair coat because of the cycling hormones. Their coats are consistently thin over the sides of their bodies and these cases are sometimes confused diagnostically with hypothyroid animals. The only treatment for these dogs is an OHE.
    http://www.peteducation.com/article....&articleid=926
    I've been BOO'd!

  12. #12
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    BTW -- I never said I have a problem with dogs "procreating." But a GSD mix should NOT be bred, which is why I gave her the info in the first place. I have no problem with REPUTABLE breeding. I'm getting my pup from a reputable breeder next year. Reputable breeding and showing are the only good reasons to leave your dog intact.
    I've been BOO'd!

  13. #13
    We let them suffer,and take the hassle cause it does make them a lot less dog if you neuter them.Put yourself in that position? Let nature have its way and if you cant constrain it go do something else.

  14. #14
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    Originally posted by Maja
    We let them suffer,and take the hassle cause it does make them a lot less dog if you neuter them.Put yourself in that position? Let nature have its way and if you cant constrain it go do something else.
    A dog has NO idea that it has been neutered. They act exactly the same. I know several CHAMPION working dogs that have been altered. They still have the aggression and drive needed to work wild hogs, cattle, and tree wild animals. Not to mention hunt bear, cougar, etc. There is alot more suffering when a dog is left intact for no purpose but the owner's own selfishness. If that dog is not meant to be bred or shown, it should be altered. Otherwise it is very frustrated -- it has to deal with hormones that make him/her feel terrible. It has to run away from home, something it knows it will be punished for, because he wants a mate. He feels a strong sense of lonliness and profound sexual frustration. When a dog is neutered, the only difference is no heat cycles, better judgement (where aggression is involved), better obedience (thinking with head instead of you know where), less health problems, less sexual drive and frustration, no marking around the house, less trying for the position of alpha, ETC. It makes life happier for both dog and owner.

    You think I'd hate the idea of being "spayed" well I don't. I don't plan to have children, so what is the point? They have proven that people have less health problems as well. My cousin is getting "spayed" as soon as she turns 24 (the legal age).
    I've been BOO'd!

  15. #15
    well i chance to differ cause have no reason to castrate any guy.Sure they wail and complain while the bitches are in heat but so what? Thats life...if I can put up with it im sure they would prefer it to..

    your suggestion coud be like this;
    When a man is neutered, the only difference is no heat cycles, better judgement (where aggression is involved), better obedience (thinking with head instead of you know where), less health problems, less sexual drive and frustration, no marking around the house, less trying for the position of alpha, ETC. It makes life happier for both man and spouse.
    which is much more attrative:

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