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Thread: Dog wanted!

  1. #31
    I've had him about 1 1/2 weeks now. When I first got him I was ready to strangle him. He was worried about everything and whined constantly. He was showing cage aggression too. Now that's all settled down and he's snoring on my feet as I type . He's my shadow when he's loose in the house. It always takes at least a few days to get the real feel of a dog's temperment. Ran out of time to take him anywhere today but I have all week to play around with him.
    Tracy

    Northwest Shepherd Haven

    "You become forever responsible for what you have tamed"
    Antoine de Saint-Exupery



  2. #32
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    He sounds like such a darling. I wonder how anybody could have ever let him go? A dog like that is such a pleasure to have around.

    What's cage aggression? I just want to forewarn my husband and kids that it's going to be a temporary thing so they won't worry about it.

    By the way, here's a picture of Axel's soon-to-be brother (hopefully), Jake!
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  3. #33
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    Jun 2000
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    Geneva, IL
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    Re: Dog wanted!

    Originally posted by stacwase
    I'd like to have the opportunity to evaluate the dog for a few months and if it didn't work out I'd pay to have it sent back or put in rescue.
    I understand that you are trying to be realistic here and indeed there are times when an adopted dog simply doesn't work out, but ...I would hope that in your search for the *perfect dog* for your family you would be willing to work with the dog who you select to find his strengths and commit yourself to training. Most older, adopted dogs do come with a bit of *baggage*. It may be separation anxiety or a bad habit or simply lack of training. I am not in any way trying to discourage you. All you have to do is look at the stories of our Dogs of the Day to find out that true gems have been found in shelters and rescue situations. I have one myself. Just want to make sure that you understand that any dog, older adopted or new puppy is going to take some work and patience and time for the relationship to mesh.
    *Until one has loved an animal, a part of ones soul remains unawakened.* Anatole France

  4. #34
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    Absolutely. But don't we all come with baggage and bad habits! I must say, though, that adult dogs are so much more predictable than puppies - and one who has been in a good rescue is even more predictable, because the rescuer has gotten to know him a little.

  5. #35
    Most older, adopted dogs do come with a bit of *baggage*. It may be separation anxiety or a bad habit or simply lack of training.
    Amen Rachel! I have had a couple of older dogs that were wonderful all the way around but all of them needed a little work in some area. I try to smooth out the rough edges as much as possible before they go to a new home but just going to a new home can start those particular issues all over again and they have to learn all the new rules of that house.

    I adopted an older pup from another rescue and it took me a month to get him out from under the table. He hadn't even seen a human until he was 14 weeks old. He's still a little strange but I still love him dearly .
    Tracy

    Northwest Shepherd Haven

    "You become forever responsible for what you have tamed"
    Antoine de Saint-Exupery



  6. #36
    Forgot to answer your question about cage aggression!

    He would sound off like he was going to rip my throat out whenever I walked toward the crate. I took him out and had a talk with him about manners and then gave him a Kong stuffed with peanut butter and back into the crate he went. He has never even offered to snap at me....just mouthing off. He was over that in 2 days and I don't really blame him after being in the pound for 22 days.
    Tracy

    Northwest Shepherd Haven

    "You become forever responsible for what you have tamed"
    Antoine de Saint-Exupery



  7. #37
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    Sep 2002
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    Upper penninsula Michigan
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    I hope all my questions aren't putting you off! The more I know about him, the better prepared I'll be. I want to make the transition as smooth as possible for him, if you choose to let me adopt him.

  8. #38
    Nope I don't mind as many questions as you have about his habits and personality.
    It's the people that ask if I guarantee hips that drive me crazy. Hard to do if I don't even know where the heck the dog came from. I can guarantee he has hips .
    Tracy

    Northwest Shepherd Haven

    "You become forever responsible for what you have tamed"
    Antoine de Saint-Exupery



  9. #39
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    Illinois
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    It sounds like you are really doing your homework to find out all you can. That's great. Have you ever been owned by a GSD? Here's some info that is posted on the German Shepherd Dog Rescue, Inc. website, just in case you'd like to know.....

    The German Shepherd Dog

    German Shepherds, also known as Alsatian, are medium-large dogs. Males generally range between 24 and 26 inches tall at the shoulder and weigh 70-90 pounds. Females generally range 22-24 inches and 60-80 pounds. Some shepherds may be a bit smaller, and some, may be as large as 30 inches and weigh as much as 140 pounds.

    The colors of German Shepherds are black and tan (with the tan portion ranging from a light cream to a deep red-depending upon the individual dog); solid black; white; bi-color (a black dog with tan legs); black and silver; blue (which looks like a very muted, grayish black and tan); sable. In a sable, just the tip of each hair is colored. Their almond-shaped eyes are medium to dark brown, and they have a black nose.

    Double-coated shepherds have a soft wooly undercoat and an outer coat of longer, harsher guard hairs. Shepherds can be coated normally or can be long coated or open coated. Long coats have about the same coat as a Belgian Tervuren. Open coats have no undercoat and usually have softer guard hairs. Even with the double coated German Shepherds, it is recommended that they reside indoors as a family member.

    Shepherds should be brushed or raked daily to reduce shedding--which can be substantial. Although they shed year round, shepherds shed most heavily twice a year when blowing their coat (lose and replace the undercoat). To prevent dry skin and itchiness, shepherds should be bathed no more than every 4-6 weeks.

    Although one or both ears on some adult shepherds don't stand, their large ears usually stand naturally-not cropped. Their ears hang down when they are born and begin to go up at approximately 2-4 months. They may flop back down when heavy-duty teething begins around 4-6 months of age. The tail should hang down to the ground when they dog is at rest and should be carried in a slight upward curve when the dog is in motion. Although not common, some shepherds have a ring tail (carried in a ring).

    German Shepherds are very intelligent, responsive dogs. Originally bred to make most of their own decisions as herding dogs, German Shepherds have the ability to think for themselves and, therefore, will assume the leadership role if not trained in obedience and given firm rules that are not to be broken. They take to obedience training quite well and excel as guide dogs, assistance dogs for the physically challenged, search and rescue dogs, police patrol dogs, narcotics dogs, agility dogs, etc.

    Because they are territorial and protective, German Shepherds are natural guard dogs. They instinctively protect their home and family from danger. Because they bark when they hear anyone or anything, they need to be supervised in densely populated areas to avoid disturbing neighbors. Games of retrieval are a good way to distract them and give them exercise when in a fenced yard. When adult shepherds are adopted, they should be kept under close supervision for about a month as they may try, out of loyalty, to escape in search of former owners before bonding to you.

    German Shepherds are energetic dogs and need routine exercise. A brisk half hour walk about twice a day is needed unless they are given a lot of interactive playtime by their owners on a daily basis. If given sufficient exercise, shepherds adapt well to apartment living.

    They need to be socialized well and early in lots of different physical environments. They are naturally aloof with strangers, and some can be a bit suspicious of strangers if not exposed to people outside the family at an early age. Some shepherds are overly aggressive, and some are very shy. Although it can be genetic, this usually is due to poor or no training. A stable shepherd is a true best friend--extremely loyal, intelligent, affectionate, protective and responsive.

    Properly socialized, shepherds are usually excellent with children, affectionate and loving with their families, accepting of family friends, aloof with strangers, and good with cats if raised with them. Some shepherds may show some dog aggression--especially males toward other males. Shepherds need a lot of human companionship. They should never be chained outside or kenneled as they will suffer emotionally.

    Possible health problems include hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, skin allergies, bloat, and spinal myelopathy (incurable paralysis of the hind legs). Hypothyroidism (low thyroid function) is common in German Shepherds although they usually do not exhibit the traditional symptoms of excess weight, laziness or sluggishness, or coat and skin problems. Thyroid problems may not occur until they are at least 4 years old. Annual blood tests are recommended to help prevent associated effects on their immune system.

    German Shepherds usually live approximately 10-12 years though many have lived to 14 or 15.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This information on the German Shepherd Dog Breed was supplied by Project Breed Directory- Green Book Edition.
    As printed on the German Shepherd Dog Rescue, Inc. site.
    Save a life, ADOPT!!
    Sue

    Rainbow Bridge Angels: Thor, Shiloh and Killian, Avalanche and Wolf
    (RB Gaylord and Bandit, fosters who have touched my heart)

  10. #40
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    Sep 2002
    Location
    Upper penninsula Michigan
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    Actually, I never have been owned by a GSD. I'm both nervous and excited about it.

    When I was a kid a GSD adopted my little sister - he just showed up at our house one day and they became attached at the hip. She was only 2 or 3 at the time, and he was about 8 years old. He kept escaping his owner and coming to be with Lisa, so his owner finally said we could have him. Lisa named him "Vegetable!"

    He protected her constantly. Once we weren't watching her as closely as we should have (I was about 10 at the time) and she went out in the street. Just before a speeding car nearly hit her, Vegetable ran out and pushed her out of the street. No kidding - it really happened!!!

    He wouldn't let anybody in the yard at night - including me or my dad! So we'd have to phone home and have Mom put him in the house just so we could come home.

    Another question for you, Tracy. When Axel displays cage aggression, how do you go about removing him from the crate and teaching him manners?

    Does he do it because being contained in the crate while you can move around freely makes him feel scared?

  11. #41
    I should of used the term "cage frustration" instead of aggression. He pulled the same thing on me the first time I saw him at animal control. He was growling and carrying on but his tail was going a mile a minute so I walked into the pen with him and got GSD kisses.

    He was just frustrated with being penned up and abandoned and he was letting me know about it. I would just take him out of the crate and put him in a sit and scratch his ears. After he relaxed I gave him the Kong and put him back into the crate. Then ignored him but stayed where he could see me.

    He now knows I'm coming back and he's stopped doing it all together.
    Tracy

    Northwest Shepherd Haven

    "You become forever responsible for what you have tamed"
    Antoine de Saint-Exupery



  12. #42
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    Sep 2002
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    Upper penninsula Michigan
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    I was wondering if it was the "fight or flight" response - and he couldn't run away so he felt like he had to fight. If I was locked up where somebody could get to me but I couldn't defend myself, I'd really be scared.

    How long did it take for him to begin feeling safe?

  13. #43
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    By the way - I'm glad he has hips, because he has to have them if we're going to be attached at the hip!

    Hahahaha I'm so funny. It took me forever to think that one up! heheheh

  14. #44
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    I better stop reading this thread or I'll be trying to adopt a GSD myself. This is getting quite exciting. I've got my fingers crossed that this beautiful animal and stacwase are destined for each other.
    *Until one has loved an animal, a part of ones soul remains unawakened.* Anatole France

  15. #45
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    indianapolis,indiana usa
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    stacwase,

    Hi & welcome to Pet Talk. I saw this other post in Dog Breeds
    about your looking for a breed other than GSD.

    "I'm looking for a Rhodesian Ridgeback to rescue. Anybody here have experience with them? "

    Just wondering if you have more knowledge about other
    breeds & a GSD would be a new experience for you? They are
    fabulous animals. Strong ,intelligent, yet so incredibly sensitive.
    I've Been Boo'd

    I've been Frosted






    Today is the oldest you've ever been, and the youngest you'll ever be again.

    Eleanor Roosevelt

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