Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: How about Siamese ???

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    canada
    Posts
    2

    How about Siamese ???

    Does any one Know if it is possible to tell if a cat is a pure bread or not. I got my boys at a pet store and they look just like Flame Point Siamese, but I really don't know if they are mixed or anything about them. They do seem to have fur that is a bit different and one is long and sleek while the other has a definite belly shape and bigger ears.
    dixiecup

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Milford, NJ
    Posts
    3,903
    Unless you got them from a breeder, than no. If you think they are siamese then they definately may have some siamese in them. But since you have no clue of the parents, then the kitties may also be mixed with something else.
    `````````````````````````
    ^NEKO^ 3/97 - 5/29/15 My baby boy, my heart and soul Forever in my heart

    ^TAMA^ 8/24/00 - 4/27/12 Thank you for being in my life I love you always and forever


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Belmont, MA, USA
    Posts
    40,742
    WIthout "papers" no one can be sure. But what we can be sure of is that they are loved, right? I would just consider them Siamese mixes, and call it good. If we were gazillionaires, we'd start a "what breed is it?" genetic testing service for people in just your position!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Independence, Kansas
    Posts
    1,045
    Dixiecup. welcome to Pet Talk. I hope you find a home here among many other cat-lovers.

    If a Siamese is not a seal-point, that is, dark fur about his ears, muzzle, tail and legs, while the remainder of their body is covered with a sort of a light brown or tan-colored fur, with blue eyes, then he is a Siamese mix. Besides, all purebreds have papers which attest to this fact from a reputable breeder. Finding a near-purebred cat is the best that can be had without breed history papers. Pure-bred siamese do not have tabby markings on them. Another factor to watch for concerning whether your cat is a Siamese mix, is whether the shape of their head is a wedge type with a long thin snout, or the conventional "apple heads". Some Siamese mix may have extended, long wedge-shaped heads.

    I have 3 furkids that are Siamese mix. Two are Flame-points and one is a lynx-point. The flame points are mostly all white with some orange on their points (that is, on their ears muzzle, legs and tail) All Siamese, and siamese mix, have blue eyes, whether they have any other siamese markings on them or not. My little lynx-point, Tiger, is more Siamese in character than the others. Although her colors are blotched, gray and white, with definite tabby markings about her face and tail with large expressive blue eyes. At least, she exhibits more Siamese habits than the other two.

    If you wish to read up on the Siamese with good photos, may I suggest that you seek, on the internet, the CFA (Cat Fanciers Association) , using any search engine. The "pure-breeders" tell you what to watch for, aside from papers, concerning any pure-bred cat.

    .......wayne
    Last edited by wayne0214; 02-06-2003 at 06:57 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Palo Alto, CA
    Posts
    77
    Here's a good resource re: Purebreds

    http://www.breedlist.com/faq/purebred.html

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    17,328
    Could we see pictures of your kitty? Purebred or not, we love them all here at Pet Talk!!!!
    Kim Loves Cats and Doggies Too!

  7. #7

    Interesting facts about Siamese Cats!!!

    Siamese cats are wonderful, beautiful and really sociable, loving personalities pets. When Siamese kittens are born, they are completely white. These cats are very intelligent, which makes them easy to train. There are several things you can train your Siamese to do including walking on a leash and toilet training. Siamese are very healthy animals, and live a long life of around 15-20 years. Here are some fun and interesting facts that you might not know

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alaska: Where the odds are good, but the goods are odd.
    Posts
    5,972
    U.C. Davis advertises a DNA testing kit you can buy to get more answers: https://www.vgl.ucdavis.edu/services...gDNATyping.php

    Parentage Testing in Animal Pedigree Verification

    Parentage Testing Procedures

    A DNA profile, which provides alleles sizes for all microsatellite markers, is obtained, and parentage analysis is performed. A variety of sample types can be utilized for routine testing, including blood, hair, semen, buccal swabs and FTA cards. Non-routine sample types include bone, teeth, saliva, dried blood, urine and feces. DNA is extracted from the samples and microsatellite marker analysis begins with the PCR procedure. In this process a computer program compares the DNA profile of the offspring to those of the presumed parents. A parentage analyst reviews the results and sends the final report. If a listed parent or parents are excluded, additional analysis is performed including retest of samples and the possible use of additional DNA markers to confirm the exclusion.

    ORDER TEST KITS
    Allow 2-6 business days for results.

    Detailed DNA Parent Verification Information

    For over four decades, parentage verification has been utilized in animal registration programs. Breeder experiences have proven that parentage testing, in combination with well run breeding programs, can ensure accurate pedigrees. This article will explain the basis of the DNA based parentage test performed at the Veterinary Genetics Laboratory (VGL) and address the role of parentage analysis in animal breeding programs.
    DNA and Microsatellite Structure

    Understanding the DNA based parentage test requires a brief explanation of DNA structure. The DNA molecule contains four variations of a chemical structure called a base. These variants are referred to in shorthand as A, C, G and T. Chromosomes are comprised of millions of these four bases arranged in a linear fashion called a DNA strand. The sequence of these four bases at specific sites, or genes, along the chromosomes is what determines the genetic code for each individual animal. Also found throughout animal genomes are specific sequences of bases repeated in a tandem fashion and referred to as microsatellite DNA markers. The most common microsatellite markers contain a two base sequence repeated in tandem. An example of this is a CA sequence repeated ten times: (...TCAGGTCTACACACACACACACACACACATGCTTATGTACT...) The genomes of mammalian species contain thousands of these microsatellite markers.
    Genetic Variation and DNA Analysis

    The number of tandem repeats found at any given microsatellite marker will vary between individual animals just as will physical appearance. Genetic variation at the microsatellite level has been exploited by molecular biologists for a variety of functions. Microsatellite markers are the basis for individual identification, generally in a forensics application, for paternity analysis in humans and for the majority of animal parentage testing done today. The various forms of a given microsatellite that are identified by differences in repeat number are referred to as alleles and are inherited in a Mendelian fashion. An animal may possess only two alleles for a specific microsatellite, one inherited from its dam and the other from its sire. The size of the alleles possessed by an offspring must correspond to those of the presumed parents. With an increase in the number of repeats there is a proportional increase in the allele size. To detect these size variations DNA is isolated from the sample, microsatellites are amplified by the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and at the same time tagged with a fluorescent dye. The dye-labeled alleles are detected by laser excitation and their size determined by gel electrophoresis and computer analysis.


    Parentage Case Scenarios

    The typical animal parentage case, as seen with most domestic species, includes a dam, offspring and one or more sires. Generally the identity of the dam is fairly certain. As mentioned earlier, in order to qualify to a set of parents an offspring must possess the same allele sizes as the parents. Outlined below are a few examples of the types of animal parentage cases submitted to the VGL. The numbers represent the allele sizes, which are the number of DNA base repeats, determined by PCR and gel electrophoresis.

    I. Typical Parentage Case

    One dam and three possible sires. For simplicity only four markers are shown.
    Marker A B C D
    Dam 86/112 150/164 202/206 224/260
    Offspring 86/112 150/156 202/204 224/226
    Sire 1 86/116 156/168 204 226/242
    Sire 2 96/120 156/158 194/202 222/242
    Sire 3 102/116 152 202 226

    In this case the dam and sire 1 qualify as possible parents. Sires 2 and 3 are excluded at several markers without consideration of the dam. The alleles that have excluded sires 2 and 3 as possible parents are shown in bold. For example, at Marker 1 the offspring's DNA type is 86/112 and Sire 2's type is 96/120; there are no alleles in common. Sire 2 and the offspring also have no alleles in common at Marker 4 and Sire 2 is again excluded.
    II. Mating Exclusion Case

    Sire 4, below, is used to illustrate such a case. The dam, offspring and sire 1 are from example I.
    Sire 4 86/128 150/164 188/202 224/228

    The offspring possesses a Marker B 156 allele, a Marker C 204 allele and a Marker D 226 allele that are not possessed by either the dam or sire 4. This data indicates that one of the parents is incorrect. The offspring could have inherited the Marker B 150 allele, the Marker C 202 allele and the Marker D 224 allele from either parent. Therefore, neither parent can be definitively excluded so the mating must be excluded.

    In the majority of cases, if all available microsatellite markers are utilized, one parent will be positively excluded from the mating. However, the outcome of a mating exclusion case can change significantly if only one parent is provided. In this case without knowledge of the dam?s genetic contribution, both sire 1 and 4 would appear to qualify as a parent, which demonstrates the importance of providing both a dam and sire in a parentage case.
    Accuracy of Parentage Analysis

    Parentage testing identifies individuals that, due to a specific combination of marker alleles, could qualify as a parent for a particular offspring. Accurate parentage testing requires breeders to identify possible parents since if considering a randomly selected large group of individuals there could be more than one that qualifies as a parent. As an example, human paternity testing was originally developed as a means to verify that a named individual could or could not be the father of a given child. At most it was meant to determine if one of several men could be the father of a child. The same rules hold true for animal parentage testing. A good application for animal parentage testing is verification that the dam is correct and which of the sires on a particular farm are the actual sire.

    Finally, it is important to remember that while parentage exclusions are 100% accurate parentage qualifications are not. The accuracy of most animal parentage tests is greater than 99% when both parents are included in the analysis and drops to around 95% when only one parent is included in the analysis. However, this accuracy will decrease when the potential parents are part of a large group of closely related animals. Again, an animal closely related to an actual parent could possess marker alleles that make it appear to be the correct parent. To prevent erroneous parentage qualifications, breeders need to submit samples from all possible parents when first requesting parentage verification. If more than one sire and one dam qualify as parents of an offspring the laboratory can then test with additional DNA markers to sort out the actual parents.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    16,683
    Quote Originally Posted by wayne0214 View Post
    Dixiecup. welcome to Pet Talk. I hope you find a home here among many other cat-lovers.

    If a Siamese is not a seal-point, that is, dark fur about his ears, muzzle, tail and legs, while the remainder of their body is covered with a sort of a light brown or tan-colored fur, with blue eyes, then he is a Siamese mix. Besides, all purebreds have papers which attest to this fact from a reputable breeder. Finding a near-purebred cat is the best that can be had without breed history papers. Pure-bred siamese do not have tabby markings on them. Another factor to watch for concerning whether your cat is a Siamese mix, is whether the shape of their head is a wedge type with a long thin snout, or the conventional "apple heads". Some Siamese mix may have extended, long wedge-shaped heads.

    I have 3 furkids that are Siamese mix. Two are Flame-points and one is a lynx-point. The flame points are mostly all white with some orange on their points (that is, on their ears muzzle, legs and tail) All Siamese, and siamese mix, have blue eyes, whether they have any other siamese markings on them or not. My little lynx-point, Tiger, is more Siamese in character than the others. Although her colors are blotched, gray and white, with definite tabby markings about her face and tail with large expressive blue eyes. At least, she exhibits more Siamese habits than the other two.

    If you wish to read up on the Siamese with good photos, may I suggest that you seek, on the internet, the CFA (Cat Fanciers Association) , using any search engine. The "pure-breeders" tell you what to watch for, aside from papers, concerning any pure-bred cat.

    .......wayne
    Flame-points, lynx-points, blue-Points, etc. are not true Siamese? I didn't know that.
    I meant," said Ipslore bitterly, "what is there in this world that truly makes living worthwhile?"
    Death thought about it.
    CATS, he said eventually. CATS ARE NICE.

    -- Sir Terry Pratchett (19482015), Sourcery

Similar Threads

  1. Name the Siamese
    By jenluckenbach in forum Cat General
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 04-19-2008, 03:54 PM
  2. 8 , not 6 Siamese
    By catmandu in forum Cat General
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-07-2004, 10:58 AM
  3. Does she have any Siamese in her?
    By In_love_with_cats in forum Cat Breeds
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-06-2003, 08:12 AM
  4. Siamese.org
    By mesiecat in forum Cat Rescue
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 06-11-2003, 11:29 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Copyright © 2001-2013 Pet of the Day.com