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Thread: Please read...

  1. #1

    Please read...

    Here is an article I wrote for my rattery site. Can you all read it and let me know what you think and if there are any spelling mistakes etc. Also one sentence needs to be worded differently. Any suggestions. It's this sentence:
    "Lets compare ingredients now, shall we? The ingredients are listed in order of the most to the least used in the food. "

    Any other suggestions would be helpful. I still have to add a few things to it, like examples of what my rats ate in the week etc. Thanks!


    How to make sure your rat gets the best diet possible, while keeping it interesting at the same time
    Written by: Cassandra Barlow 2002

    As with all animals proper diet is essential to your rat's health. Rats are omnivorous, which means they eat both plant and animal material. Rats love food in general and will eat themselves silly, savoring every morsel. They seem to eat just to have something to do. Rats love junk food, just try to keep it as healthy as possible. Table scraps can be given as treats but in no way should they be the staple diet. Below I will outline my own rats' diet, as well as go over healthy treats you can offer your
    rats. Eating the same thing every day can get boring. Hopefully this article will give you ideas on how to add variety in the diet, while keeping it healthy at the same time.

    First off, most commercial rat feeds are not healthy and should not be given. Most commercial feeds contain harmful additives and preservatives such as Ethoxyquin, a preservative which contains toxins that can cause seizures and in most reported cases, cancer in fancy rats. They also contain corn which most often contains fungus and mold, tiny seeds which are not eaten (some of my rats eat them) and also alfalfa pellets which are hard for a little rats stomach to digest. If you want to add roughage timothy pellets are a safer option. Some rabbits have been known to develope bladder stones if fed too much alfalfa.

    Your rat should be fed a staple diet that consists of a well-balanced dry dog food or a small animal lab block. This kind of food gives them the complete nutrition a rat needs and also helps keep their teeth from becomming overgrown. Lab
    blocks are hard food made especially for rodents. You should be able to find them in most pet stores, feed stores and sometimes also through breeders, as well as online. Some good brands to consider are Harland Tecklad (http://www.teklad.com/), Purina and Mazuri brand lab blocks. All of these can be purchased online at pet food sites. My rats also are fed Innova Senior dog
    food. I prefer Innova over Nutro Natural Choice dog kibble. By comparing the ingredients for both types of food you will see that Innova is made of healthier ingredients.

    Lets compare ingredients now, shall we? The ingredients are listed in order of the most to the least used in the food.

    Innova-

    Ingredients:
    Turkey (main ingredient)
    Chicken
    Ground Barley
    Ground Brown Rice
    Potatoes
    Rice
    Chicken Meal
    Herring
    Chicken Fat
    Apples
    Carrots
    Cottage Cheese
    Sunflower Oil
    Alfalfa Sprouts
    Egg
    Garlic
    Prebiotics
    Probiotics
    Chondroitin Sulfate
    Glucosamine
    Vitamins/Minerals

    Nutrition facts:
    Linoleic Acid 2.89 %
    Omega 3 0.41 %
    Protein 18 %
    Fat 8 %
    Fiber 5.5 %
    Moisture 9.5 %
    Calories 397 Kcal/cup
    Calories 1587 Kcal/lb
    Carbohydrates 51.83 %
    Ash 6.17 %


    Nutro-

    Ingredients:
    Rice Flour (main ingredient)
    Lamb Meal
    Ground Rice
    Rice Bran
    Beet Pulp
    Sunflower oil
    Poultry Fat
    natural flavor
    yeast culture
    Potassium Chloride
    Monosodium Phosphate
    Dried egg product
    Dried Kelp
    Ferrous Sulfate
    Choline Chloride
    Zinc Sulfate
    Vitamin E supplement
    Ascorbic acid
    Biotin
    Manganous Oxide
    Garlic flavor
    Calcium Pantothenate
    Niacin
    Vitamin B12 Supplement
    Riboflavin Supplement
    Vitamin A acitate
    Glucousamine
    Copper Sulfate
    Pyridroitin hydrochloride
    Thiamine mononitrate
    Chondroitin sulfate
    calcium iodate
    Menadione sodium bisulfite complex
    sodium selenite
    vitamin D3 supplement
    folic acid

    Nutrition facts:
    crude protein 14.00%
    crude fat (min) 6.00% (max) 8.50%
    crude fiber 6.50%
    moisture (max) 10.00%
    Linoleic acid (min) 2.50%
    Zinc (min) 250 mg/kg
    Vitamin E (min) 100 IU/kg
    Ascorbic acid (min) * 40 mg/kg
    Glucosamine (min) * 400 mg/kg
    Chondroitin Sulfate (min) * 300 mg/kg
    * Not recognized as an essential nutrient by the AAFCO Dog Food Nutrient

    Profiles


    Of course just because I prefer Innova doesn't mean that Nutro is a bad food. Nutro is a very good food, and healthier than most other dog foods. It's just what my rats do very well on. I still feed Nutro Natural Choice Light dog biscutes as treats. Now, as a rule, the less protein a rat gets the better, try to keep it within healthy limits. A nice protein range for bucks should be around 9 to 15
    percent. Females can be fed a higher protein ratio. A 14 to 18 percent protein ratio works well with females. As you can see Innova senior contains 18% protein, so my bucks get fewer kibbles than the females and I try to offset the protein levels with more veggies and fruits, as well as pastas. If bucks are fed too
    much protein this can lead to dry, flaky skin as well as an excess of "buck grease". This is an orangish oily substance that is secreted by bucks. Hairless rats are very prone to this, although they need more protein than standard furred bucks because they burn most of it off keeping themselves warm. If you notice
    that your buck has too much grease, and it's taking away from his natural beauty, you need to cut down on his protein ratio. Try adding more vegetables or pasta to his diet.

    Pregnant and lactating does, as well as kittens (baby rats) are also given kitten food such as Purina One or Science Diet. They are also supplemented with Nutrical, a nice tasting vitamin/mineral supplement. It is often used for breeding
    bitches and working/field dogs in the dog fancy. Nutrical can be purchased from your veterinarian or at Pet Superstores such as Petco or Petsmart.


    My rats also recieve a grain mix which includes but is not limited to (I mix it differently once a week, switching ingredients. If I find something else healthy I throw that into the mix also. Cornflakes, nut clusters etc.):


    dry vegetable pasta (beet, spinach, tomatoe, carrot and squash)
    green split peas
    yellow split peas
    barley
    lentils
    alphabet pasta (whole wheat flour, spinach, tomatoe, celery, onion, beets
    and garlic)
    Cheerios
    puffed wheat and rice
    oat groats
    timothy hay pellets (much easier on a ratties delicate digestive
    tract, but still adds the needed roughage)
    millet seed
    Milo
    rolled oats
    Sunflower seeds
    pumpkin seeds
    banana chips ( no sugar added)
    dried papaya (no sugar added)
    macadamia nuts
    walnuts
    pecans
    almonds
    Toasted Corn Flakes
    Cream of Wheat
    Wheat Flakes
    Canadian Field Peas
    Pine Nuts (help protect against cancer, also referred to as soy nuts)
    Dried Cane Molasses

    I spend around $13 dollars for this mix, which usually lasts up to a month with 15 rats. I buy bulk at my local supermarket. Trader Joes is a great place to buy healthy bulk foods at a cheap price. It's better to spend $13 dollars for food that will last a month, than to keep returning to the petstore every week for another
    bag of unhealthy mix.

    Fresh fruits may include but are not limited to:
    strawberries
    grapes (seedless)
    banana
    pear
    apple (without seeds, they are toxic)
    oranges (only for does, which helps protect against cancer, NOT FOR
    BUCKS!)
    watermelon
    cantelope
    kiwi fruit
    papaya
    prunes
    raisins
    avacado ( a fruit)
    tomatoes (actually a fruit)
    nectarines
    peaches
    plums
    honeydeew melon
    mango
    blueberries

    Fresh vegetables include but are not limited to:
    acorn squash
    mustard greens
    collard greens
    green and red leaf lettuce
    romaine lettuce
    spinach
    radisho
    cucumber
    potatoes
    alfalfa sprouts
    zucchini
    pumpkin
    asparagus (limited because it can cause gas)
    brocolli (can cause gas so feed in small amounts)
    cauliflower (" ")
    brussel sprouts
    carrots
    celery
    fennel (like celery)
    sweet potatoe
    and sometimes cooked corn on the cob

    Take care not to feed too much watery greens or fruits, as excess water can lead to diarrea.

    Treats I give:
    peanuts
    chicken bones
    pork chop bones
    fish sticks
    yogies (half a yogie per adult size rat)
    RITZ crackers
    active yeast cultured yogurt (contains good bacteria that aids digestion)
    dog biscutes
    cooked pasta
    bread soaked in soy milk
    scrambled eggs
    hot dogs
    Top Ramen
    Macaroni and Cheese
    canned cat or dog food
    crickets (store bought)
    mealworms
    rice cakes
    cheese
    baby food
    baby cereal
    and anything else they seem to will like, as long as it is somewhat healthy.

    Remember, these are treats! These are not to be fed often. For comparison, one chocolate chip to a ratty equals a full candy bar to a human.

    Whole protein sources:
    chicken
    beef
    pork
    tuna
    salmon
    liver

    My rats also recieve a mineral block, brewers yeast, and fish oil. I have seen dramatic improvements in the overall condition of my rats when these products are used.

    Things such as bacon, lasagna, french fries, hamburger etc. are fed VERY sparingly, like once every two weeks. Remember, moderation is the key. Try to keep it as healthy as possible, but a little junk food won't hurt if given every so often. Pine nuts, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds as well as other nuts contain a lot of protein so make sure you only add a few to
    your mix, or better yet save them for play time and use them as treats. My rats are in perfect health and are not overweight. Their coats are shiny, eyes are bright and they are alert and playful.


    What NOT to feed:
    *carbonated beverages
    *too many peanuts ( destroys vitamin A and enzymes used to break down proteins and starches, it's best to use these are treats)
    *too much cheese (use a tiny pinch as a treat)
    *peanut butter can cause a rat to choke and they cannot vomit, they lack the neccesary muscles that would allow them to do so
    *dried corn (can cause liver cancer)
    *iceburg lettuce (full of water and has no nutrional value)
    *orange juice or orange peel, this causes cancer in male rats (although it protects against mamary tumours in does...)
    *blue cheese dressing (toxic!)
    *Licorice
    *Rhubarb
    *red cabbage (causes gas) artichokes (causes gas)
    *raw banana, potatoe skins, green or starchy potatoes (not ripe all the way)
    *too much chocolate
    *avoid all dairy products if your rat is experiencing any signs of respiratory distress!!!
    *poppy seeds can cause neurological damage and sometimes death

    Hope this gives everyone here ideas on what they can add to their rats diet while still keeping it healthy, but appealing and
    interesting at the same time.
    Fuzzies for Furries
    Northwest Opossum Society
    Zoology Major
    2 Virginia Opossums, 6 cats, 4 bearded dragons, 1 iguana, 1 red foot tortoise, 1 tripod chihuahua, 5 mice, dubia and hissing cockroaches as well as other misc animals that wander in and out of my home.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Lawrenceville, Ga, USA
    Posts
    2,492

    Re: Please read...

    I will have to get some time to read it all, but on your sentence in question

    Originally posted by luckies4me
    "Lets compare ingredients now, shall we? The ingredients are listed in order of the most to the least used in the food. "
    What about changing the last part:

    "Lets compare ingredients now, shall we? The ingredients are listed in order of amount, from most to least. "
    Scott is owned by 5 cats: Jackson, Fluffy, Twidgit, Ashton, Lexi;
    and 3 dogs: Eli, Sassee, Ginger

    Fuzzy317's Pictures

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Lawrenceville, Ga, USA
    Posts
    2,492

    Re: Please read...

    These all my impressions, do not take them as gospel.

    -----------------------
    They also contain corn which most often contains fungus and mold, tiny seeds which are not eaten (some of my rats eat them) and also alfalfa pellets which are hard for a little rats stomach to digest.
    I don't think you need to have stomach at the end, it should be understood
    "... hard for little rats to digest.
    ---------------------------
    misspelled
    This kind of food gives them the complete nutrition a rat needs and also helps keep their teeth from becoming overgrown.
    ---------------------------
    I don't think you need both terms
    You should be able to find them in most pet stores, feed stores and sometimes also through breeders, as well as online.
    maybe leave out also
    You should be able to find them in most pet stores, feed stores and sometimes through breeders, as well as online.
    ---------------------------
    misspelled
    Some good brands to consider are Harland Teklad (http://www.teklad.com/), Purina and Mazuri brand lab blocks.
    ----------------------------
    Scott is owned by 5 cats: Jackson, Fluffy, Twidgit, Ashton, Lexi;
    and 3 dogs: Eli, Sassee, Ginger

    Fuzzy317's Pictures

  4. #4
    Thanks! I thought it DID say Teklad though. Hmm... I knew there were a lot of mistakes but I haven't had a chance to change them yet. Just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing any before I put the article up. Thanks again for all your help!
    Fuzzies for Furries
    Northwest Opossum Society
    Zoology Major
    2 Virginia Opossums, 6 cats, 4 bearded dragons, 1 iguana, 1 red foot tortoise, 1 tripod chihuahua, 5 mice, dubia and hissing cockroaches as well as other misc animals that wander in and out of my home.

  5. #5
    LOL! The word becoming. I ALWAYS speel that wrong, no matter how many people tell me lol! I know how to spell it correctly but it never fails, I always have to add another m. I think it's pretty funny, lol. You would htink I would get it through my head after so many times.

    I'm suprised I didn't have more mistakes. I wasrushing so fast to get it done and didn't have a chance to go over it. It's a nice suprise!

    See? There I go again, lol. Speel. hahahahah
    Fuzzies for Furries
    Northwest Opossum Society
    Zoology Major
    2 Virginia Opossums, 6 cats, 4 bearded dragons, 1 iguana, 1 red foot tortoise, 1 tripod chihuahua, 5 mice, dubia and hissing cockroaches as well as other misc animals that wander in and out of my home.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Lawrenceville, Ga, USA
    Posts
    2,492
    There are more spelling mistakes Do you have access to a spell check program? it would make things easier.
    Scott is owned by 5 cats: Jackson, Fluffy, Twidgit, Ashton, Lexi;
    and 3 dogs: Eli, Sassee, Ginger

    Fuzzy317's Pictures

  7. #7
    Yep like I said, I didn't have time to go over it and I wrote it so fast there are tons of mistakes. I really just wanted to know how to change that one sentence though and you helped a lot!
    Fuzzies for Furries
    Northwest Opossum Society
    Zoology Major
    2 Virginia Opossums, 6 cats, 4 bearded dragons, 1 iguana, 1 red foot tortoise, 1 tripod chihuahua, 5 mice, dubia and hissing cockroaches as well as other misc animals that wander in and out of my home.

  8. #8
    WOW! It's amazing how many mistakes you can make when you do something too fast. Finished it now:

    How to make sure your rat gets the best diet possible, while keeping it interesting at the same time
    Written by: Cassandra Barlow 2002

    As with all animals proper diet is essential to your rat's health. Rats are omnivorous, which means they eat both plant and animal material. Rats love food in general and will eat themselves silly, savoring every morsel. They seem to eat just to have something to do. Rats love junk food, just try to keep it as healthy as possible. Table scraps can be given as treats but in no way should they be the staple diet. Below I will outline my own rats' diet, as well as go over healthy treats you can offer your
    rats. Eating the same thing every day can get boring. Hopefully this article will give you ideas on how to add variety in the diet, while keeping it healthy at the same time.

    First off, most commercial rat feeds are not healthy and should not be given. Most commercial feeds contain harmful additives and preservatives such as Ethoxyquin, a preservative which contains toxins that can cause seizures and in most reported cases, cancer in fancy rats. They also contain corn which most often contains fungus and mold, tiny seeds which are not eaten (some of my rats eat them) and also alfalfa pellets which are hard for a little rats to digest. If you want to add roughage timothy pellets are a safer option. Some rabbits have been known to develop bladder stones if fed too much alfalfa.

    Your rat should be fed a staple diet that consists of a well-balanced dry dog food or a small animal lab block. This kind of food gives them the complete nutrition a rat needs and also helps keep their teeth from becoming overgrown. Lab
    blocks are hard food made especially for rodents. You should be able to find them in most pet stores, feed stores and sometimes through breeders, as well as online. Some good brands to consider are Harlan Teklad (http://www.teklad.com/), Purina and Mazuri brand lab blocks. All of these can be purchased online at pet food sites. My rats also are fed Innova Senior dog
    food. I prefer Innova over Nutro Natural Choice dog kibble. By comparing the ingredients for both types of food you will see that Innova is made of healthier ingredients.

    Lets compare ingredients now, shall we? The ingredients are listed in order of the most to the least used in the food.

    Innova-

    Ingredients:
    Turkey (main ingredient)
    Chicken
    Ground Barley
    Ground Brown Rice
    Potatoes
    Rice
    Chicken Meal
    Herring
    Chicken Fat
    Apples
    Carrots
    Cottage Cheese
    Sunflower Oil
    Alfalfa Sprouts
    Egg
    Garlic
    Prebiotics
    Probiotics
    Chondroitin Sulfate
    Glucosamine
    Vitamins/Minerals

    Nutrition facts:
    Linoleic Acid 2.89 %
    Omega 3 0.41 %
    Protein 18 %
    Fat 8 %
    Fiber 5.5 %
    Moisture 9.5 %
    Calories 397 Kcal/cup
    Calories 1587 Kcal/lb
    Carbohydrates 51.83 %
    Ash 6.17 %


    Nutro-

    Ingredients:
    Rice Flour (main ingredient)
    Lamb Meal
    Ground Rice
    Rice Bran
    Beet Pulp
    Sunflower oil
    Poultry Fat
    natural flavor
    yeast culture
    Potassium Chloride
    Monosodium Phosphate
    Dried egg product
    Dried Kelp
    Ferrous Sulfate
    Choline Chloride
    Zinc Sulfate
    Vitamin E supplement
    Ascorbic acid
    Biotin
    Manganous Oxide
    Garlic flavor
    Calcium Pantothenate
    Niacin
    Vitamin B12 Supplement
    Riboflavin Supplement
    Vitamin A acetate
    Glucousamine
    Copper Sulfate
    Pyridroitin hydrochloride
    Thiamin mononitrate
    Chondroitin sulfate
    calcium iodate
    Menadione sodium bisulfate complex
    sodium selenite
    vitamin D3 supplement
    folic acid

    Nutrition facts:
    crude protein 14.00%
    crude fat (min) 6.00% (max) 8.50%
    crude fiber 6.50%
    moisture (max) 10.00%
    Linoleic acid (min) 2.50%
    Zinc (min) 250 mg/kg
    Vitamin E (min) 100 IU/kg
    Ascorbic acid (min) * 40 mg/kg
    Glucosamine (min) * 400 mg/kg
    Chondroitin Sulfate (min) * 300 mg/kg
    * Not recognized as an essential nutrient by the AAFCO Dog Food Nutrient

    Profiles


    Of course just because I prefer Innova doesn't mean that Nutro is a bad food. Nutro is a very good food, and healthier than most other dog foods. It's just what my rats do very well on. I still feed Nutro Natural Choice Light dog biscuits as treats. Now, as a rule, the less protein a rat gets the better, try to keep it within healthy limits. A nice protein range for bucks should be around 9 to 15
    percent. Females can be fed a higher protein ratio. A 14 to 18 percent protein ratio works well with females. As you can see Innova senior contains 18% protein, so my bucks get fewer kibbles than the females and I try to offset the protein levels with more veggies and fruits, as well as pastas. If bucks are fed too
    much protein this can lead to dry, flaky skin as well as an excess of "buck grease". This is an orangish oily substance that is secreted by bucks. Hairless rats are very prone to this, although they need more protein than standard furred bucks because they burn most of it off keeping themselves warm. If you notice
    that your buck has too much grease, and it's taking away from his natural beauty, you need to cut down on his protein ratio. Try adding more vegetables or pasta to his diet.

    Pregnant and lactating does, as well as kittens (baby rats) are also given kitten food such as Purina One or Science Diet. They are also supplemented with Nutrical, a nice tasting vitamin/mineral supplement. It is often used for breeding
    bitches and working/field dogs in the dog fancy. Nutrical can be purchased from your veterinarian or at Pet Superstores such as Petco or Petsmart.


    My rats also receive a grain mix which includes but is not limited to (I mix it differently once a week, switching ingredients. If I find something else healthy I throw that into the mix also. Cornflakes, nut clusters, etc.):


    dry vegetable pasta (beet, spinach, tomato, carrot and squash)
    green split peas
    yellow split peas
    barley
    lentils
    alphabet pasta (whole wheat flour, spinach, tomato, celery, onion, beets
    and garlic)
    Cheerios
    puffed wheat and rice
    oat groats
    timothy hay pellets (much easier on a ratties delicate digestive
    tract, but still adds the needed roughage)
    millet seed
    Milo
    rolled oats
    Sunflower seeds
    pumpkin seeds
    banana chips (no sugar added)
    dried papaya (no sugar added)
    macadamia nuts
    walnuts
    pecans
    almonds
    Toasted Corn Flakes
    Cream of Wheat
    Wheat Flakes
    Canadian Field Peas
    Pine Nuts (help protect against cancer, also referred to as soy nuts)
    Dried Cane Molasses

    I spend around $13 dollars for this mix, which usually lasts up to a month with 15 rats. I buy bulk at my local supermarket. Trader Joes is a great place to buy healthy bulk foods at a cheap price. It's better to spend $13 dollars for food that will last a month, than to keep returning to the petstore every week for another
    bag of unhealthy mix.

    Fresh fruits may include but are not limited to:
    strawberries
    grapes (seedless)
    banana
    pear
    apple (without seeds, they are toxic)
    oranges (only for does, which helps protect against cancer, NOT FOR
    BUCKS!)
    watermelon
    cantaloupe
    kiwi fruit
    papaya
    prunes
    raisins
    avocado (a fruit)
    tomatoes (actually a fruit)
    nectarines
    peaches
    plums
    honeydew melon
    mango
    blueberries

    Fresh vegetables include but are not limited to:
    acorn squash
    mustard greens
    collard greens
    green and red leaf lettuce
    romaine lettuce
    spinach
    radisho
    cucumber
    potatoes
    alfalfa sprouts
    zucchini
    pumpkin
    asparagus (limited because it can cause gas)
    broccoli (can cause gas so feed in small amounts)
    cauliflower (" ")
    brussel sprouts
    carrots
    celery
    fennel (like celery)
    sweet potato
    and sometimes cooked corn on the cob

    Take care not to feed too much watery greens or fruits, as excess water can lead to diarrhea.

    Treats I give:
    peanuts
    chicken bones
    pork chop bones
    fish sticks
    yogies (half a yogie per adult size rat)
    RITZ crackers
    active yeast cultured yogurt (contains good bacteria that aids digestion)
    dog biscuits
    cooked pasta
    bread soaked in soy milk
    scrambled eggs
    hot dogs
    Top Ramen
    Macaroni and Cheese
    canned cat or dog food
    crickets (store bought)
    mealworms
    rice cakes
    cheese
    baby food
    baby cereal
    and anything else they seem to will like, as long as it is somewhat healthy.

    Remember, these are treats! These are not to be fed often. For comparison, one chocolate chip to a ratty equals a full candy bar to a human.

    Whole protein sources:
    chicken
    beef
    pork
    tuna
    salmon
    liver

    My rats also receive a mineral block, brewers yeast, and fish oil. I have seen dramatic improvements in the overall condition of my rats when these products are used.

    Things such as bacon, lasagna, french fries, hamburger, etc., are fed VERY sparingly, like once every two weeks. Remember, moderation is the key. Try to keep it as healthy as possible, but a little junk food won't hurt if given every so often. Pine nuts, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds as well as other nuts contain a lot of protein so make sure you only add a few to
    your mix, or better yet save them for play time and use them as treats. My rats are in perfect health and are not overweight. Their coats are shiny, eyes are bright and they are alert and playful.


    What NOT to feed:
    *carbonated beverages
    *too many peanuts (destroys vitamin A and enzymes used to break down proteins and starches, it's best to use these are treats)
    *too much cheese (use a tiny pinch as a treat)
    *peanut butter can cause a rat to choke and they cannot vomit, they lack the necessary muscles that would allow them to do so
    *dried corn (can cause liver cancer)
    *iceburg lettuce (full of water and has no nutritional value)
    *orange juice or orange peel, this causes cancer in male rats (although it protects against mammary tumors in does...)
    *blue cheese dressing (toxic!)
    *Licorice
    *Rhubarb
    *red cabbage (causes gas) artichokes (causes gas)
    *raw banana, potato skins, green or starchy potatoes (not ripe all the way)
    *too much chocolate
    *avoid all dairy products if your rat is experiencing any signs of respiratory distress!!!
    *poppy seeds can cause neurological damage and sometimes death

    Hope this gives everyone here ideas on what they can add to their rats diet while still keeping it healthy, but appealing and
    interesting at the same time.
    Fuzzies for Furries
    Northwest Opossum Society
    Zoology Major
    2 Virginia Opossums, 6 cats, 4 bearded dragons, 1 iguana, 1 red foot tortoise, 1 tripod chihuahua, 5 mice, dubia and hissing cockroaches as well as other misc animals that wander in and out of my home.

  9. #9
    In the ingredients part, I copied it from the site so .....I don't know if those are mispelled or not? I ran it through the spell check program and it said some were wrong and I changed them to what I thought was right, but you would htink Nutro would know how to spell their ingredients right?
    Fuzzies for Furries
    Northwest Opossum Society
    Zoology Major
    2 Virginia Opossums, 6 cats, 4 bearded dragons, 1 iguana, 1 red foot tortoise, 1 tripod chihuahua, 5 mice, dubia and hissing cockroaches as well as other misc animals that wander in and out of my home.

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