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Thread: Breathing issues on Prednisone

  1. #1

    Breathing issues on Prednisone

    Hi,

    I have a cat who is 1 and a half years old. She began having some coughs in January which I mistook for hairball in the beginning. If in the beginning they were sporadic, by March they came about 2/3/4 times a week. So I took kitty to vet. First, they did his bloodworks and was diagnosed diabetic with 179 and was given a bronchodilator and histaminic. Things didn t solve so I went to another vet one week later. They did a radiography, bloodworks again, faeces and orofarigian sample tests and on the saliva test doc found many bacterias. Because she did a fructosamine test, she denied diabetes and was given Prednisone and Doxycycline. He is worse now. Coughing has stopped but he has laboured breathing, and mainly abdominal breathing which I believe it s bad. And he seems to wheeze when breathing. Also, sometimes-not always, he gently cries if I try to hold him in my arms as if in pain. I will go for a thoracic U/S on Sunday but today is only Thursday...am I waiting too long? I told doc that his breathing worsened ..or better said...showed up right when I started with the prednisone. Can there be a connection? Can it be a side effect this one? He used to breathe normally before. He still eats well, drinks water but has become quite inactive. I wouldn t say he s lethargic but inactive. He still is curious for things but due to hard breathing he prefers to not move too much I think. I spoke to my doc today and asked to start wean him off prednisone starting today. He was supposed to take 10 mg per day for 4 days and then 5 mg per day for another 4 days. I asked to reduce it to 5 mg starting with today(the 4th day). She agreed to my idea. At the moment he is sleeping.

    What is your view on this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Prednisone usually lessens inflammation, but he may be allergic to it, so stepping down sounds like the right idea. I am asthmatic - when they put me on Prednisone I can suddenly breathe again, but am also ravenously hungry!
    I've Been Frosted

  3. #3
    I have heard of cases where due to heart problems, cats got worse and worse..I'm scared this could be his case. He hasn't become lethargic, he still eats and drinks water but he's definetely in distress.

  4. #4
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    I would definitely call the vet, and see if they have any ideas, poor kitty!
    I've Been Frosted

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    If one of my cats was breathing heavy, and that continued for more than an hour, I would rush the kitty in to a vet.

    I'm sorry you are having such a difficult time getting a handle on what is happening with your cat. Prayers for a good diagnostic.

  6. #6
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    I think you should call the vet you trust the most and tell him/her about this. It could be that some of the medicine has side effects and makes things worse. A vet ought to know about that! Is there a way to test if your cat is allergic to something, like with humans?

    Keep an eye on her and comfort her as best as you can. I hope you'll get to the bottom of this and your cat will be OK.

    Sending positive thoughts.



    "I don't know which weapons will be used in the third World war, but in the fourth, it will be sticks and stones" --- Albert Einstein.


  7. #7
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    Labored breathing in cats is always a big concern. I agree with everybody that you should take your kitty to the vet as soon as possible. You might have to go to an after hours clinic. Good Luck!
    cats4ever

  8. #8
    Update.
    I went with my cat to the clinic for a check up as I was very worried in the morning. My doc was off that day so another vet checked him up. I insisted for them to listen to his lungs and heart and tell me if they feel he has liquid in the lungs or around heart. The doc assured me there is no water after listening to him and checking his one week old radiography. I asked for a second opinion so another doc came( I was that worried). Same thing I was told. They said there is a faint murmur of sorts but after checking radiography she said it is normal because he has bronchopneumonia. A diagnostic which didn't fit with my doc's one. They said it was clear from his radiography this diagnostic and told me his breathing is not that bad given his problem. Also, she reckoned there might be an improvement because what she saw on the radiography from a week ago seemed quite bad. And his lungs actually sounded pretty normal now. They said there's no need for U/S because there is no liquid. They tried to calm me down and gave me a liquid bronchodilator to put into his food twice a day for easier breathing. It actually helped. He still tires easily and has somewhat heavy breathing but it's not alarming anymore.
    He developed diarrhea but I assume it's from the antibiotic. This morning, 3 days after. I played with him a bit with the wand. I didn t exert him too much and now he is resting next to me Today is his 8th day of doxycycline which I haven t yet given it to him. I am going to the doctor tomorrow for an U/S. My doc is concerned about lymphom, FIP or FIR. She kinda suspects him of the worse. But I hope she is mistaken as he eats and drinks normally, plays with me a bit, and has started breathing better.

  9. #9
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    That's good he is doing better, glad the meds are helping. Thanks for updating us!
    I've Been Frosted

  10. #10
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    Glad he is doing better! I hope further examination, if it shows anything, shows something very treatable.
    "You can say any foolish thing to a dog, and the dog will give you a look that says, 'Wow, you're right! I never would've thought of that!'" -- Dave Barry

  11. #11
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    Thanks for your update. I'm so glad he is doing better, and hopefully he will be back to normal very soon.

    Sending lots of healing thoughts.

    Do you have a picture of him?



    "I don't know which weapons will be used in the third World war, but in the fourth, it will be sticks and stones" --- Albert Einstein.


  12. #12
    I can't even type as I m crying. He has got Chylothorax which is a very rare disease where fluid accumulates in the thorax thus making breathing very hard. He has almost no chances of surviva;, as doctors have told me this disease is merciless and few cats get away with it. IToday they got 300ml of milky liquid out of him, he seems to breathe easier but liquid will probably accumulate soon enough again. The procedure must be repeated. Unfortunately, most cats need to have this liquid taken out by punction every day or every other day. And not even is it expensive, there s little chance of remission out of it. Most pets are eventually put down. I can't believe this is happening to my baby...he is such a sweetheart and so young....

  13. #13
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    I am very very sorry to hear this news. I thought his breathing was getting better and there was some hope.

  14. #14
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    Zenny, oh no - how heartbreaking!

    I found this - perhaps it will help!

    https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-p...thorax-in-cats

    "Treatment is first directed at stabilizing the cat by restoring normal breathing. Fluid can be drained from the pleural space with a syringe and needle. In almost all cases, the fluid will reform within twenty-four to seventy-two hours and a chest drain will need to be surgically placed to facilitate daily drainage. This drain may be left in place until chyle accumulation stops. A supplement called rutin may be a beneficial treatment in some cats with chylothorax. It is thought to stimulate cells called macrophages to remove the fat in the chyle, and may reduce the amount of fluid accumulation. Rutin is available at pharmacies and health stores. .

    A low fat diet is generally also recommended to lower triglyceride levels.
    Feline chylothorax is a disease under active research. Several new treatments may be on the horizon. Regardless, the most successful therapy will be directed toward treating the underlying disorder."

    And this:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1180424/

    "A 9-year-old, male castrated cat was presented with labored breathing and lethargy of 5 d duration. Idiopathic chylothorax was diagnosed based on clinical signs, thoracic radiographs, and thoracentesis. Partial resolution of the pleural effusion followed treatment with rutin, a benzopyrone extracted from plants. The etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of this disease are discussed."


    Your kitty is so young perhaps this is worth a try. I know the idea of a surgically implanted drain sounds gross, but ask your vets about it. It would save repeated punctures for now.

    One article talked about surgery on the thoracic duct, but there was no further information on it.

    GOOD LUCK! Keep the faythe!
    "You can say any foolish thing to a dog, and the dog will give you a look that says, 'Wow, you're right! I never would've thought of that!'" -- Dave Barry

  15. #15
    I thought so too...but the news today painted everything in black.

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