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Thread: Breeding a male red tri BC (Border Collie)

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  1. #1

    Breeding a male red tri BC (Border Collie)

    I have a red tri BC. He has a beautiful coat and is a wonderful companion. Wants to be with me 24/7.
    Is very easy to teach and get to do what I want. He even put up with me when I found 2 cats. Made
    friends with them right away. He is fixed and was never bred. The next dog I get, I was thinking about
    breeding him. This would just be for fun, I don't expect to make any real money at it. I wonder what
    are some of the pitfalls involved in having an unfixed male BC?

    I really like the reddish brown and sable colors on BCs and Aussies. I realize there is a pet overpopulation
    problem. But, I don't believe BCs are part of that problem. I waited 6 months for a BC or Aussie, to be
    given up at a county shelter. The first one, that was, went to a lady in management of the shelter.

    BCs are high maintenance, I understand that. I have a dog park near where I live, otherwise I would not
    have such an energetic dog. The red BC, I have now is 11. I hope he lasts another 5 years. But, sooner
    or later I will need to replace him. My vet says go to a breeder. So, the question will be should I get him
    fixed or not?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Delaware, USA - The First State/Diamond State - home of The Blue Hens
    Posts
    9,046
    Please re-think your idea of breeding "just for fun". Fun for who???? - certainly not the dog or the puppies that could end up in a shelter. I am confident that I am with the vast majority of members here, who would place this practice at the very bottom of their list of priorities when it comes to our furry companions. There are thousands of dogs (BC's included - whether or not you want to admit it) that are euthanized every day, because there are no homes for them - yet you want to add to these numbers? If you are so BC crazy, perhaps you should consider volunteering to foster them, or work at a shelter near you. When you see the heartbreak day after day, of dogs longing for love and attention and a home of their own, then perhaps it will give you a new perspective on the life that these poor animals live, while waiting for that slim chance that they will leave the confines of that wire cage behind them. Please don't add to the misery by breeding - just for your fun.
    I've Been Boo'd
    Thanks, Barry
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Waltham, MA, USA
    Posts
    36,430
    If you are not planning on showing the dog, I would absolutely him fixed. Perhaps the reason you didn't see any at your local shelter is not that there are none out there, but that both Border Collies and Aussies have a very committed rescue community, who will pull them from shelters as soon as they get there, because being in a confined space for any period of time can drive a busy herding breed like them over the edge toward destructive behavior, and cause longer-term problems.

    I just Google "Border Collie Rescue" and cam up with a whole page of Border Collie Rescue groups based in various states and regions - and that's just the first page.

    Go to http://Petfinder.com and type in your zip code and you can look for what dogs are needing homes near you!
    I've Been Frosted

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Rhode Island; USA
    Posts
    16,820
    As Karen said, the rescues group for both BCs and Aussies are staffed very committed people! Volunteers who love the breeds and know how to work with them.

    Breeding for 'fun' is just nuts. A reputable breeder is going to do extensive genelogical work and have testing done on both sire and dam to ensure no genetic defects are present. A reputable breeder is working to improve the breed, and is actively involved with the breed group - either in conformation, or Agility, field trials, etc. A reputable breeder provides a minimum 2 years health guarantee and will insist that ANY puppy placed be returned to him if the dog cannot be cared for, at any time during the life of the dog. The reputable breeder has all this in the contract, and makes sure the contract is enforced! I've a FB friend enforcing a contract with a bichon puppy she placed in Belgium, and the people apparently got rid of the dog; she has hired legal counsel and is getting the dog BACK.

    Are you committed and prepared to do all of this? Any reputable breeder will tell you, breeding is not a money maker; it is a big financial hole, and they are in it for the love of the breed and to better the breed. NOT 'for fun.'

    Thank you Karen, for fixing my siggy!

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Karen View Post
    If you are not planning on showing the dog, I would absolutely him fixed. Perhaps the reason you didn't see any at your local shelter is not that there are none out there, but that both Border Collies and Aussies have a very committed rescue community, who will pull them from shelters as soon as they get there, because being in a confined space for any period of time can drive a busy herding breed like them over the edge toward destructive behavior, and cause longer-term problems.
    I volunteered at a shelter, as a dog walker for 6 months. The problem there was too many Pit Bull mixes. Very few Borders Collies and Aussies came in. When
    ones that did come in, would be adopted quickly. Other desirable dogs were adopted quickly as well. Like Golden Ret, Jack Russells, Beagles and other hounds.
    It was the Pit Bulls, that had the population problem. Both the shelter adoption mgr and myself, worked with some rescue groups. We found them to be very difficult. Like the Ellen Degeneres and Mutts and Moms, issue that was in the media. One group I contacted, said I had to have a fenced in back yard, in order
    to adopt a BC. They had many other requests, like a vet reference. I did not have a dog, at the time, so I would I have that? I gave up on rescue groups.

    I plan to work with my vet, who has not discouraged me from doing this. I also want a BC, in the colors I like. It is my money and I should be able
    to get what I want. My current red tri, is a dog a lot of people ask what kind he is and say what a beautiful coat he has. I give him an Omega 3 capsule
    everyday. That makes his coat shine. He is a lot of fun and a big part of my life. I may have a mental breakdown when he goes. So, I will most likely get
    another dog first.

  6. #6
    The vet isn't going to discourage you from doing this, the vet is going to make money off of this.

    ANY puppy is part of the overpopulation problem, and it is utterly, completely irresponsible and classically narcissistic to breed an animal and add to the overpopulation problem. Animals are getting put to sleep every day because fools continue to breed more.
    The one eyed man in the kingdom of the blind wasn't king, he was stoned for seeing light.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    St. Louis, Missouri
    Posts
    5,375
    Any breeding should only be done to benefit the breed on not only looks and temperament, but also genetically. If you don't know about genetics... you should not venture into breeding. There are also a myriad of medical testing that should be done PRIOR to any breeding to make sure that you are breeding a sound specimen and hopefully contributing TO the gene pool, not taking away from it.

    Breeding should never be "for fun"... if it is, then you are just a backyard breeder. I hate to be that blunt about it, but breeding should be taken WAY more seriously than "I have an intact male, you have an intact female, let's breed them for puppies!!".

    If you really are serious about this, I strongly recommend you look into some local border collie clubs in your area or online and reach out to some breeders there... and perhaps choose one to be your mentor.

    Re: pet overpopulation...

    You say that pit bulls are the problem when in the same breath saying that "other mixes like aussies, BCs, goldens, etc, were adopted out much more quickly". Well... of course they were... for every aussie, BC, golden, etc that was adopted out means that a pit bull puppy was passed up. ANY puppy bred, intentionally, unintentionally, responsibly or irresponsibly, is adding to the pet overpopulation... it does not matter what breed it is. If you're going to do it, at least be responsible about it and do it right or don't do it at all.

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