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Thread: Manic behavior

  1. #1

    Manic behavior

    This is my first post on any blog ever....but am concerned about my GSP. He is 9 and about 3 years ago he exhibited manic behavior one evening....pacing around the room, licking the floor, licking the furniture. I immediately took him out and he starting eating grass....not just a little bit, but practically mowed the back yard. He later threw up and seemed back to normal. The next day we went to the vet and determined since it was an isolated incident, we would just watch to see if it happened again. A month went by before the next incident. Then another few weeks before the third incident. We have since gone 2 years with no episodes and the last two evenings in a row it has happened again. Since the grass in our area is not green, it doesn't seem to cause the throw up to happen as quickly or with as much volume of grass. When he is having one of these episodes, I talk to him quietly and encourage him that everything is OK, but he is frantic and eating grass rapidly. Usually lasts from 15 to 30 minutes. Anyone have a thought?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
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    Waltham, MA, USA
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    36,206
    Quote Originally Posted by gspgirl View Post
    This is my first post on any blog ever....but am concerned about my GSP. He is 9 and about 3 years ago he exhibited manic behavior one evening....pacing around the room, licking the floor, licking the furniture. I immediately took him out and he starting eating grass....not just a little bit, but practically mowed the back yard. He later threw up and seemed back to normal. The next day we went to the vet and determined since it was an isolated incident, we would just watch to see if it happened again. A month went by before the next incident. Then another few weeks before the third incident. We have since gone 2 years with no episodes and the last two evenings in a row it has happened again. Since the grass in our area is not green, it doesn't seem to cause the throw up to happen as quickly or with as much volume of grass. When he is having one of these episodes, I talk to him quietly and encourage him that everything is OK, but he is frantic and eating grass rapidly. Usually lasts from 15 to 30 minutes. Anyone have a thought?
    Have you asked the vet if this could be caused by seizures? I know GSP are more prone to epilepsy than some other Pointer breeds, it would be something to sk the vet about. Seizures are tricky, they are not all "Fall to the ground and twitch uncontrollably" events that people associate them with ....
    I've Been Frosted

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Rhode Island; USA
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    16,781
    Could he be getting into food somewhere? The trash, maybe? He actions sound like a dog with an upset tummy, he needs to throw up and eating grass is what makes them do this. Dogs are quite intuitive about what they need. Are you using a treat once in a great while that is not agreeing with him? That could be it. Since the episodes are so spaced apart, it is not a food he is getting daily. Maybe a relative or friend visits now and then and brings over something for the dog -- or even something for you and your family, and you give the dog some scraps?

    I really think this is some food he is eating which is not agreeing with him.

    Another possibility (just thought of it!): is this happening when he has been left a bit longer than usual? What is he throwing up, is it food or just yellow bile? Could be he is going too long with no food, and stomach acid builds up giving indigestion. Again, the dog will eat grass to throw up the excess bile. Does he readily take a treat or a bit of food after he throws up? That would also mean it is an empty tummy. Older dogs, like older humans, need to eat smaller meals more often, as compared to what they used to do when they were younger. Maybe this is happening when you are going out after work, so his meal is delayed a few hours?

    Those are a few things to think about. Hope it helps!
    Thank you Karen, for fixing my siggy!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin
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    4,669
    I agree with Karen. I'd ask your vet about the possibility of a psychomotor seizure. Toxins building up in the liver might also be a possibility.
    "There are two things which cannot be attacked in front: ignorance and narrow-mindedness. They can only be shaken by the simple development of the contrary qualities. They will not bear discussion."

    Lord John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Salisbury Plain, UK
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    1,520
    I have a GSP and a GWP, The GSP has allergies to everything and can only be fed fish and rice, she also has a hole in heart. I have to keep her weight down and her fitness high. She is quite small and with the amount of activity to keep her fit she takes a lot of feeding! I feed her three times a day just to get enough food into her without overloading her tummy. If she drinks straight after eating she is often sick as her tummy can't cope with the volume, so I feed a small meal in the morning, a small meal at lunchtime and a big meal in the evening that has been soaked in warm water for at least 20 minutes.
    The Wire Haired can, and will, eat anything - I have seen him climb trees to get the remains of buzzard kills! He will usually pass things that don't agree with him in a smelly runny mess but has, on occasion been sick. Pointers, especially German Pointers tend to have fairly delicate tummies although their tastes are not!
    My Wire Haired also can get stuck on licking shoes, furniture, the other dog, a wall . . . whatever, but does not seem connected to any sickness. He is a grass eater too and needs to be distracted from it sometimes. Maybe your dog is eating stuff when out walking (my GWP can remember where a pigeon has died or a cat has had a poop for weeks!) that you don't see or maybe it is just being a Pointer (aren't they brilliant?) or maybe it is showing signs of allergy. You also need to make sure that along with exercise the dog is getting enough mental stimulation, working dogs need to work. Hope that gives you some ideas.

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