Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 18

Thread: Canine Cognitive Dysfunction

  1. #1

    Canine Cognitive Dysfunction

    Does anyone else have a dog going through this? My Deputy is a 7yr old large mix who was recently diagnosed with early stage CCD. He gets disoriented, forgets how to do things at times (get off someones lap, ask to come in/go out, etc), and has lost weight. He has not had any accidents, but does have anxiety attacks at times.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Waltham, MA, USA
    Posts
    36,755
    We don't have any experience with this, thankfully. Did they say what it was caused by or related to? Does he seem confused by things? Poor thing, would any change in diet or anything help?
    I've Been Frosted

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Karen View Post
    We don't have any experience with this, thankfully. Did they say what it was caused by or related to? Does he seem confused by things? Poor thing, would any change in diet or anything help?
    Vet thinks he may have a brain tumor or cancer somewhere else in his body. Other then the weight loss, Dep has shown no alarming physical symptoms. All tests (blood, urine, stool) came back normal and he had a full body physical.

    After waking up is when his confusion/disorientation is at its worst. He will stare around wide eyed and start panting heavily. You have to coax him out of the room at times, its almost like he's forgotten how to exit a room/jump off the bed. He also has started darting out of the door (never did this before) and taking off into the woods or down to the road in front of the house (not used anymore since the late owners son moved away). When I call to him he will actually run further away. It took my mom with a bag of treats to get him out of the woods tonight.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Waltham, MA, USA
    Posts
    36,755
    Oh, that must be so hard to watch! You may end up having to keep him on a run or on a long leash for his outside time for now. Will they do further tests as they suspect a brain tumor? Poor pooch!
    I've Been Frosted

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Karen View Post
    Oh, that must be so hard to watch! You may end up having to keep him on a run or on a long leash for his outside time for now. Will they do further tests as they suspect a brain tumor? Poor pooch!
    I actually have a 3 acre pasture (fenced) that he can get his exercise in and we are making sure he is in another room before we open an outside door. I can no longer take him on walks outside of the property due to his anxiety. He will mark nearly every three feet (someone mentioned that it sounded like he was leaving a "trail" so he wouldn't get lost) and start looking worried.

    The vet only wants to do tests if he exhibits more symptoms. Vet has over 30 years of experience and doesn't like to do unnecessary things.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Rhode Island; USA
    Posts
    16,860
    My RB Marlin had this. Marlin would walk in to a corner and get stuck, and whine, fuss and howl until we went and turned him around. He was not able to figure out how to get out of the corner.

    Marlin also forgot how to let us know he had to go out, or come in. You will need to get on a schedule, say every 4 hours? To let him out. And of course, someone must stay near him, and decide when it is time for him to come in.

    I did not spend the money on learning if it was a brain tumor, nor x rays looking for a tumor, as the result was the same; there is not cure, just keep him comfortable.

    You mentioned he is disoriented when he awakens. Perhaps touching him, stroking him, holding him will help. HOWEVER you also need to be cautious, as he may not recognize you and could snap / bite. Talk to him in low tones.

    Marlin was alright on walks if he was bumping up next to my leg the whole time. He felt safe with ME, even though he did not know where he was. Over time, he forgot how to walk, same as humans with dementia. So it would take a good 7 minutes to get him moving. Once started, he kept going, which was good. Marlin had always been one who HAD to move and have exercise to keep his bowels moving and prevent constipation, so I had to walk him separately the last 8 months or so (I had 5 dogs at the time).

    You will need to monitor his food and water intake. And see that he is always on a soft bed; he may not know and will lie down on a hard floor, then be uncomfortable but not know why, or what to do about it.

    Marlin walked and paced a LOT. Then he started moving in circles, which my vet said was a sign he was nearing the end. Once he started uncontrolled vocalizing, it was time. Up to then, Marlin did not seem in pain, and he did not have the extreme anxiety you describe, so I felt his quality of life was ok.

    At the same time this was happening, I was caring for my Dad who has dementia; the 2 of them progressed along similar lines, it was amazing to see! The hard part was when both needed to go to the bathroom at the same time, and neither knew WHERE to go. Dad's bathroom is the opposite direction to the door out back for Marlin. I often wonder now, how I ever managed.
    I've been BOO'd!!
    Thank you Karen, for fixing my siggy!

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Freedom View Post
    My RB Marlin had this. Marlin would walk in to a corner and get stuck, and whine, fuss and howl until we went and turned him around. He was not able to figure out how to get out of the corner.

    Marlin also forgot how to let us know he had to go out, or come in. You will need to get on a schedule, say every 4 hours? To let him out. And of course, someone must stay near him, and decide when it is time for him to come in.

    I did not spend the money on learning if it was a brain tumor, nor x rays looking for a tumor, as the result was the same; there is not cure, just keep him comfortable.

    You mentioned he is disoriented when he awakens. Perhaps touching him, stroking him, holding him will help. HOWEVER you also need to be cautious, as he may not recognize you and could snap / bite. Talk to him in low tones.

    Marlin was alright on walks if he was bumping up next to my leg the whole time. He felt safe with ME, even though he did not know where he was. Over time, he forgot how to walk, same as humans with dementia. So it would take a good 7 minutes to get him moving. Once started, he kept going, which was good. Marlin had always been one who HAD to move and have exercise to keep his bowels moving and prevent constipation, so I had to walk him separately the last 8 months or so (I had 5 dogs at the time).

    You will need to monitor his food and water intake. And see that he is always on a soft bed; he may not know and will lie down on a hard floor, then be uncomfortable but not know why, or what to do about it.

    Marlin walked and paced a LOT. Then he started moving in circles, which my vet said was a sign he was nearing the end. Once he started uncontrolled vocalizing, it was time. Up to then, Marlin did not seem in pain, and he did not have the extreme anxiety you describe, so I felt his quality of life was ok.

    At the same time this was happening, I was caring for my Dad who has dementia; the 2 of them progressed along similar lines, it was amazing to see! The hard part was when both needed to go to the bathroom at the same time, and neither knew WHERE to go. Dad's bathroom is the opposite direction to the door out back for Marlin. I often wonder now, how I ever managed.
    Luckily Dep has only gotten stuck in one corner so far. For now all the dogs go out when one decides he/she needs to. I have another dog, Abby, who is acting like his "caregiver" right now. She will lick his face when he is upset and tell us when she thinks he needs to come in/go out. We also make sure we know were he is at all times.

    He eats less then he used to and appears to be drinking the same amount. I am careful about how I wake him up and everyone talks softly to him and gently touches the top of his head. He sleeps on my bed at night and during the day is on the couch or my parent's bed.

    My maternal grandma passed away due to Alzheimers in 2010 and, I agree, it is amazing how similar brain/cognitive disorders can progress in people and dogs.

    How long did Marlin have from onset till the circling/vocalizing?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Rhode Island; USA
    Posts
    16,860
    About 18 months from diagnosis to the end. He was circling for almost 4 weeks before the vocalizing started. My vet had advised me to expect this as the progression (though she had no info re time frame). I had him in to be PTS in less than 24 hours after the vocalizing started; it started on a Sunday, of course. It wasn't constant, non stop, more random, and we all did sleep that last night together.

    Try touching the dog on the front side/ shoulder area , not the top of the back, and not the head. In dogdom, head touches are considered aggressive. A dog will put a leg over another dog's back when he is showing dominance, so not the top of the back, either.

    You mentioned he is losing weight. While Marlin did lose some weight, this was not a big deal in our situation. Yo u may find that he will reach a weight which is unacceptable for keeping him going.

    That is awesome that Abby is helping care for Deputy!
    I've been BOO'd!!
    Thank you Karen, for fixing my siggy!

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Freedom View Post
    About 18 months from diagnosis to the end. He was circling for almost 4 weeks before the vocalizing started. My vet had advised me to expect this as the progression (though she had no info re time frame). I had him in to be PTS in less than 24 hours after the vocalizing started; it started on a Sunday, of course. It wasn't constant, non stop, more random, and we all did sleep that last night together.

    Try touching the dog on the front side/ shoulder area , not the top of the back, and not the head. In dogdom, head touches are considered aggressive. A dog will put a leg over another dog's back when he is showing dominance, so not the top of the back, either.

    You mentioned he is losing weight. While Marlin did lose some weight, this was not a big deal in our situation. Yo u may find that he will reach a weight which is unacceptable for keeping him going.

    That is awesome that Abby is helping care for Deputy!

    Usually I don't touch a dog on the head/back, but with Dep that is the only way to wake him up. Just talking to him seems to make him more confused.

    This is Dep.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN1901.jpg 
Views:	41 
Size:	1.23 MB 
ID:	57820

    Abby
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN1902.jpg 
Views:	37 
Size:	1.20 MB 
ID:	57821

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    404
    I have no experience with this, but they are beautiful!
    Owned by my baby and heart-dog Lolli.

    If each pet we love takes a part of our heart and replaces it with a part of theirs, my heart is a very strange collection of pieces, but I wouldn't have it any other way


    Some people believe holding on and hanging in there are signs of great strength. However, there are times when it takes much more strength to know when to let go, and then do it. --Ann Landers

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Rhode Island; USA
    Posts
    16,860
    Thanks for sharing their photos. Abby is so proud sitting up tall! And Dep, he looks like a nice fella.

    I didn't mean just talk to him, sorry. I was trying to explain where to touch him. As he has dementia, the instincts will remain longest, so something which never bothered him as a pet, may (MAY, I have no idea if they will) invoke an age old instinct, and help to confuse him.

    Also, long slow strokes are calming, soothing, while short rapid pats are anxiety producing.
    I've been BOO'd!!
    Thank you Karen, for fixing my siggy!

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Freedom View Post
    Thanks for sharing their photos. Abby is so proud sitting up tall! And Dep, he looks like a nice fella.

    I didn't mean just talk to him, sorry. I was trying to explain where to touch him. As he has dementia, the instincts will remain longest, so something which never bothered him as a pet, may (MAY, I have no idea if they will) invoke an age old instinct, and help to confuse him.

    Also, long slow strokes are calming, soothing, while short rapid pats are anxiety producing.
    You can really see the German Shepherd in her when she sits like that. Dep is one of those dogs that would make a perfect family dog (if he wasn't sick). Abby is going to be a mess when we lose him. She treats him like her puppy.

    Oh, okay, sorry about the misunderstanding. Have you heard of any dogs with this having issues with aggression? I brought my concerns up to the vet when I saw him yesterday (cat got neutered) and he said it could happen. We had been talking about Dep's anxiety and how the meds might cause aggression.

    This morning he was really forceful about wanting on my mom's lap (she said he was almost frantic and she had to use all her strength to keep him off (she has back problems and didn't' want to risk injury if he forgot how to get off again).

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Rhode Island; USA
    Posts
    16,860
    I've not heard of dogs developing aggression issues, but I'm sure it could happen; it certainly does with humans who have dementia!

    As for him being forceful about getting in her lap, that sounds more like a panic attack, at least the way you described it. Poor boy, so scared and knew he would find comfort in a human lap -- but picked the wrong human!
    I've been BOO'd!!
    Thank you Karen, for fixing my siggy!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    indianapolis,indiana usa
    Posts
    22,840
    Quote Originally Posted by Ezio View Post
    You can really see the German Shepherd in her when she sits like that. Dep is one of those dogs that would make a perfect family dog (if he wasn't sick). Abby is going to be a mess when we lose him. She treats him like her puppy.

    Oh, okay, sorry about the misunderstanding. Have you heard of any dogs with this having issues with aggression? I brought my concerns up to the vet when I saw him yesterday (cat got neutered) and he said it could happen. We had been talking about Dep's anxiety and how the meds might cause aggression.

    This morning he was really forceful about wanting on my mom's lap (she said he was almost frantic and she had to use all her strength to keep him off (she has back problems and didn't' want to risk injury if he forgot how to get off again).

    Is Dep on any medication right now? I was reading about a drug used to treat this problem. It's called Anipryl. ( generic is selegiline). Has your Vet recommended this?
    I've Been Boo'd

    I've been Frosted






    Men, it has been well said, think in herds. It will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one."
    — Charles Mackay, Scottish journalist, circa 1841

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Rhode Island; USA
    Posts
    16,860
    That a good medication to review and consider. By the time my vet suggested it for Marlin, he was too advanced, and passed 3 weeks later. So I really have no info on it, whether it helps or not.
    I've been BOO'd!!
    Thank you Karen, for fixing my siggy!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Copyright © 2001-2013 Pet of the Day.com