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Thread: How to Stop Your Cat from Interfering With Your Sleep

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    21,042

    How to Stop Your Cat from Interfering With Your Sleep

    http://www.care2.com/greenliving/how...our-sleep.html



    Owning a cat is a fantastic and rewarding experience. And in the end, they become more like our children than mere pets. Unfortunately, just like young children, they can keep us awake at night for various reasons. This lack of sleep often wreaks havoc on our lives, especially for those of us who have to get up early for work. So, why do cats keep you up at night? And what can you do about it?
    Melanie, for instance, has had cats all her life. But her new kitty, Iggy, has been leaving her exhausted at work. “He thinks it’s playtime when I am trying to get to bed. And everything is a toy, even my fingers and feet. I don’t know what to do!”
    If this sounds familiar, don’t start weeping. As Melanie discovered, the answer was pretty simple. She sets aside between 30 minutes to an hour for kitty playtime. Laser lights, colorful string, toy mice, whatever gets the cat worked up. Of course, as she says, “You need to be part of the play. Sometimes I run around the house with Iggy chasing me, and it works beautifully — for both of us. At bedtime we’re both extremely tired and sleep like logs.”
    John had a similar problem. His cat, Shadow, would always “run around like a mad thing at the most inopportune time — from 3 to 6 o’clock in the morning. And not just running and leaping about, but yowling.” It was driving John crazy.
    His solution? “Playing with Shadow helped, a little. But after I got him neutered he calmed down. My vet said it helps tomcats calm down, and it worked.” It helps by stopping those irksome I-want-to go-on-the-prowl-and-meet-a-lady-cat hormones. The other bonus: your cat won’t start spraying in the house. And what about queens (also known as female cats)? It helps them, too. No unwanted kittens and no going into heat — perfect.
    See Also: Cat Behavior 101 (Slideshow)
    Erin had a slightly different problem with her cat, Charlie. “Working long hours meant when I got home, sometimes late at night, all I wanted to do was collapse in bed. But Charlie wasn’t having any of it. He’d not only run about, jump on me and wake me, but would also be very vocal. I don’t think I had a good night’s sleep for a month.”
    Erin tried playing with Charlie; she even tried feeding him catnip. Finally she came to a realization. “He was bored all day by himself. So I got another cat. I did worry they wouldn’t get along, so I waited until I had a week’s vacation. Now, Charlie and Bella are best buds and when I get home, we play and then go to sleep.”
    James had this to say about his cat. “Tigra was fine when we went to bed; she liked to curl up next to me. But when she’d decide to wake up and play, she was looking for a play buddy. She’d run around the room, even nipping my arm lightly to get my attention. My solution was simple: she got locked out of the room.”
    How did that work? Well, his solution takes time, patience and determination. “She would cry and scratch at the door, but I wouldn’t give in. Eventually she would do it less and less, and now, she hardly does it at all.”
    James says it took him almost two weeks, lots of valerian and ear plugs to make it through, but it worked. Now he gets to have Tigra with him and a decent night’s sleep.
    Then there’s Vanessa. Her cat would always wake her at 5 o’clock in the morning; something she found was giving her dark circles under the eyes and making her less efficient at work. “Max always woke me wanting to be fed,” Vanessa said. “So I simply started making sure he got his evening meal around 10 p.m., rather than at 6, as I had always done. Now I’m able to rest at night, and Max is no longer begging for food at some ungodly hour.”
    So if your cat is keeping you up at night, take heart from these stories. It might take a little trial and error, but you should be able to find the right solution to combat your cat’s behavior. Whether it’s play, a change in dinnertime, a companion, training or even a little catnip, we know your answer is there, just around the proverbial corner.
    Related:
    10 Fantastic Cat Facts (Slideshow)
    Should I Keep My Cat Indoors?
    5 Most Dangerous Cat Diseases
    "Life is like an elevator. On your way up, sometimes you have to stop and let some people off." -- Author Unknown

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    39,819
    I as an old man am a restless sleeper and only My Empress from her box can brave my tossing and turning.
    The rest sleep elsewhere.
    THE RAINBOW BRIDGE FOUND HOTEL ANGELS HAVE A NEW FRIEND IN CORINNA.


    ALMOND ROCCA BATON AND ELLIE ANGELS ARE GUARDIANS TO ETERNAL KITTENS ROCC-EL AND T TEEN ANGEL, ALMOND ROCA , VLAD , PAWLEE , SPRITE. LITTLE HEX, OSIRIS AND ANNIE ANGELS.
    EBONY BEAU TUBSTER AND PEACHES BW SPIKE & SMOKEY


    NOW PRECIOUS AND SAM ARE TOGETHER WITH ETERNAL KITTENS SAMMY ,PRESLEY, SYLVESTER AND SCRATCHY JR , MIGHTY MARINA, COSMIC CARMEN, SAMSON ,UNDER KITTY AND SUNKIST AUTUMN & PUMPKIN.
    MIA AND ORANGE BLOSSOM ANGELS HAVE ADOPTED TUXIE , TROOPER , SONGBIRD AND LITTLE BITTY KITTIES MIA-MI BLOSSOMER, TUXEDO AND DASH AS THIER ETERNAL KITTENS.
    PRINCESS JOSEPH AND MICHAEL ARE CELEBRATING 19 YEARS AS LUCKY FOUND CATS

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Waltham, MA, USA
    Posts
    36,848
    This seems to be a solution lacking a problem! Seems common sense to either not let the cats sleep in the bedroom from the start, or to exhaust the cat with playtime before you go to bed.

    Cats are trainable, humans just have to try! More often, the cats train the humans, and then sometimes problems arise!
    I've Been Frosted

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