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Thread: The good guys thread

  1. #241
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    Man Turns in Lost $13,000, Gives Away Reward

    A cleaning service worker at a Florida airport found an iPad – with $13,000 stuffed in its case – and turned it in. He then gave away the small reward he got from the owner to two people in need. To honor that honesty, the Broward County Aviation Department in Florida presented Patrick Morgan with a gift and plaque on Wednesday. His employer, Sunshine Cleaning Systems, also gave him $625, equivalent to a week of paid vacation, according to NBCMiami.com. This time, he said he'll keep the money.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  2. #242
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    It Only Took A Moment!

    As I departed my school grounds one recent late afternoon, I noticed that the sky was beginning to darken as rain clouds began to close in and motorists around me began to become agitated and as they worked through the traffic to get home. As I turned on to a major avenue near the University of Hawaii, some drivers in their cars were literally pushing and shoving to change lanes. One impatient individual shot out and was forcibly trying to enter from the next side street. I was two cars back when suddenly it happened. A bicyclist whizzed by my passenger side, tried to stop, but slammed broadside into the vehicle who was very much in the wrong. The bicyclist was able to slowly pick himself and his bike up and stumble towards the sidewalk as EVERYONE drove off. I knew that I had to check on this young man. I put on my blinker and turn right and as I pulled up to him, I could see that he was bewildered and shaking his head. He had some road rash abrasions on his hand. Upon my inquiry he said that he was OK. I gave him a towel for his cuts and then ran and got some ice nearby that we then applied to his split chin. As we waited for his mom to come pick him up and take him to a local emergency room for some sutures. He personally thanked me by my name for stopping. It turns out that this young college student was one of my former middle school students.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  3. #243
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    Workers Hand Over Mystery $300,000 Gold Stash to Grateful Homeowners

    Workers struck lucky by discovering a large amount of gold hidden under the floor of a house in Sacramento - but they were honest enough to hand it over to their clients, who had no idea it was there. While installing an HVAC system in September, Steve Ottley and his partner came across 12 large baby food jars filled to the brim with gold dust.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  4. #244
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    Mailing Memories

    I stopped on my way home to a mailbox to drop off some letters and noticed an elderly man having a hard time getting out of his vehicle and to the mailbox because of all the ice. After getting out of my car I dropped off the mail and asked him if he wanted some help to get to the mailbox. He kindly accepted and I helped him keep his balance and let him hang on to me for support while I dropped off his letter and then walked him back to his vehicle.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  5. #245
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    CHARLESTON, MO - How far would you go to help a co-worker in need?

    A Charleston woman who was diagnosed with kidney failure received the gift of life from an unlikely source, her boss.

    Last Spring, life as Deborah Smoot knew it changed in an instant.

    She went in for an annual checkup. "My blood pressure was high, I've been having blood pressure issues for years," said Deborah Smoot.

    She followed up, and after a number of tests was diagnosed with kidney failure.

    "He (her doctor) said I want to put you in the hospital, put in an access, and start dialysis today," said Smoot.

    For a woman who felt and looked healthy, the news was no doubt a huge shock.

    "I said I don't drink, don't smoke, I drink water all of the time," said Smoot. "I don't understand it."

    She'll never forget what the doctor said next.

    "He said, you can go, but I'm telling you you're going to go home and you're going to die," said Smoot. "Your heart is going to stop beating and you're going to die."

    She started dialysis, and waited to get listed for a transplant.

    Meanwhile, Deb went back to work as a probate clerk at the Mississippi County Courthouse.

    One day, she learned she was on the list for a transplant. Deb had phone number in hand for anyone to call and find out how to get tested.

    "We're in a large office, and when I got the number I was so excited about getting listed I said, oh oh...I'm listed for a transplant," said Smoot.

    Deb's boss, Leigh Ann Colson, the County Circuit Clerk overheard the news.

    "I said, if we're the same blood type I don't mind being tested," said Leigh Ann Colson.

    "I said, that's a lot to ask," said Smoot. "She (Colson) said I might as well be tested, why not."

    Leigh Ann did just that, and after several tests she got a phone call.

    "They said we were compatible, they wanted to do further testing," said Colson.

    "I was like, are you kidding me what are the chances of this," said Smoot.

    Deborah Smoot's boss was a perfect match.

    "My whole family was in shock, she was the first to be tested and she was a match," said Smoot. "The good Lord up above had a big role in that."

    There were some initial concerns.

    "My mom was a basket case," said Colson. "She didn't want me to do this, she said think about your family."

    Leigh Ann has two boys, Brady and Riley.

    "I was afraid, but it was her body and her choice," said Brady Colson.

    Last month, that choice led both women to the operating room.

    They have a photograph of the actual kidney that was taken out of Leigh Ann, and is now working like a charm inside Deb.

    "It's just a miracle I'm telling you," said Smoot.

    They're now home, still recovering from surgery in January.

    There's some pain but Leigh Ann says it's worth it.

    "Just knowing I could help her and she's going to be around," said Colson.

    They are no longer just boss and employee. The two women have a bond that can never be broken.

    "It's nice knowing I could help someone who needed help," said Colson.

    "I don't know what she has felt, but I can't thank her enough," said Smoot. "I don't have enough words to tell her how important this has been to me."

    Both women hope their story will raise awareness about the importance of organ donation.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  6. #246
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    Crying Toddler

    I went grocery shopping a few weeks ago. When I was checking out there was a woman with a little boy behind me in line. He saw the cheese I was buying & started crying loudly because his mother told him it was mine & not for him. When I finished checking out I opened the package of cheese & gave him one of the wedges (individually wrapped). The biggest smile came over his face & his mother thanked me profusely. I didn't do this for the thanks; I just hate to see a little one so upset over something that simple.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  7. #247
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    Kindness Coat

    If everyone would just do one random act of kindness a day just imagine what a better world we would live in. I work with someone who is struggling. He works outside and has a jacket that is very old and battered. I found a jacket in my son's closet that my son didn't want. Although it isn't new; it was close to it. Barely ever worn. I brought it in and gave it to my coworker. He was so excited and thankful. I didn't know who was going to cry first; him or I. He said how warm it was and how thankful he was. I also use coupons to grocery shop. So I am able to stock up when there are good deals. I work with many people that aren't as fortunate as we are. So every few months I gather enough groceries to give someone. It is usually about a week's worth of meals and snacks. Most don't want to accept them and don't want anyone to know they are struggling. So I never tell anyone who I help. I love to give back and will continue to whenever I can!
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  8. #248
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    Helping a Friend

    I have a friend who does not have dental insurance. She has a dentist that will take her as a patient and bill her for services rendered. She said that she needs to pay down her balance to a certain point before she feels comfortable to go again for much needed work. What I have done is found out who her dentist is and have added a $25 - $50 monthly payment to my budget to help pay down her debt and she, at this point in time, has no idea it is happening. I mail in a payment with a note to post it to her account. Would love to see her face when she realizes it will be paid off sooner than she thinks. Smiling thinking about it!
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  9. #249
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    Tambos Treasures

    I started crocheting hats for the Phoenix Children's Hospital several years ago. I sent them with my daughter when she was volunteering on the cancer ward. She said that they were very excited to get them. In the last year I have broadened my creativity and started crocheting headbands, decorating baseball caps, decorating socks with silly faces, and decorating little canvas tote bags and filling them with toys. I have given them to Phoenix Children's Hospital (probably several hundred), The Ryan House and The Ronald McDonald House in Phoenix, Az. and I sent a box to St. Judes Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. I truly enjoy making these for some very brave and courageous children. I get so much out of giving these to sick children. My gift is my time. Tammi Sbordoni.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  10. #250
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    I just love these stories. They make me smile.

  11. #251
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    Leave a Book

    Most people take the bus, and leaving a book with a Post-It note saying "Enjoy " on your seat as you leave is one way to make someone's day. You could do this on an airplane or even a train, too!

    (Note from Lisa/kuhio98 ~ Whenever I have to use the laundromat to wash big items – for some reason, I absolutely hate the laundromat – I always leave old paperbacks there because I remember what it’s like to be bored to tears with nothing to read.)
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  12. #252
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    DJ rocks despite hearing loss

    Robbie Wilde thumbs through his iPhone as the sounds of voices and clinking glasses bounce all around him. His eyes never leave the phone's screen.

    During New York Fashion Week, Wilde, 27, passes the time with friends and management at an exclusive party in Hell's Kitchen before taking over the turntables.

    Wilde lives in a world of rhythm and bass. He just can't hear it.

    Ear infections at age 7 left Wilde completely deaf in his right ear and took away 80% of his hearing in his left one.

    It would be another four years before doctors would confirm what his mother, Maria Sapeta, dreaded: Her son was deaf.

    "It was heartbreaking as a mother," she recalled. "It was probably one of the hardest days of my life. But Robbie was the one who gave me a hug and said, 'Don't cry.'"

    Originally from Portugal, Sapeta and her husband, Emidio, then a cruise ship chef, had moved to the United States when Wilde was 5.

    From childhood, he always had a "persistent personality," Sapeta said, laughing. Unlike many other kids his age, he always finished what he started -- from puzzles to cabins made from Lincoln Logs.

    After losing his hearing, his grades slipped because he had difficulty understanding his teachers. Bullied in school, Wilde usually kept his deafness a secret.

    When his parents suggested he attend a specialty school, he insisted on staying in public school. He worked with a speech therapist and began reading lips.

    "I grew up in a way that I don't want any sympathy. I don't want to be treated differently," he said. "I just tried to maneuver around, reading lips and trying to hear my own way."

    When her son announced he wanted to be a professional DJ instead of joining the family restaurant business, Sapeta was cautiously supportive.

    "We could see his talent and his passion, but I kept worrying about that left ear," she said. "Anything to stop his dreams, he didn't want it."

    Hearing is the most important sense for a DJ, who manipulates music, scratches records and uses mixers. But Wilde was determined to succeed without his.



    Always drawn to music, he discovered turntables in high school through a friend's brother who was a DJ.

    Wilde got his first shot at performing as a DJ at his father's restaurant outside Newark, New Jersey, nearly a decade ago, and he hasn't looked back since.

    "I still consider it as a hobby. I really do love it," Wilde said. "I don't see it as a job, and that's the best part."

    Wilde started out playing CDs before pushing himself to scratch records, something he knew he needed help with.

    "It's a hard business alone for the hearing community," he said, "And I was like, 'I'm hearing impaired and how's that going to work?'"

    So he paired up with two-time DMC world champion DJ and Harvard math grad Sam Zornow, aka DJ Shiftee, who was teaching at Dubspot, a DJ school and production studio in New York.

    Mastering turntables is a skill that takes hours of practice to learn and can be a lifelong pursuit, Zornow said.

    "It takes two years just to get bad," he said. "And I mean 'bad' meaning bad."

    Still, Zornow was up to the challenge of working with Wilde. At first he didn't know what to expect, but he said Wilde's success has surprised him.

    "On paper it should be impossible. You're dealing with manipulating sound. Then combine that with a discipline that's hard in general, it's a really impressive task he's taken on," Zornow said. "From the beginning he believed in himself and continues to believe in himself."

    Computer giant Hewlett-Packard noticed Wilde's skills and put him in a commercial this fall for its new touch-enabled PC, thrusting him onto the world stage.

    "It's a true story of inspiration," said HP marketing executive Danielle Jones. "His is a profound story of someone being able to do the things that matter to them and the things that they love through technology."

    Unable to hear lyrics or complete compositions, Wilde relies on technology to see the music by using his laptop and DJ software that helps him differentiate between vocals, bass and kicks.
    He also feels the vibration whether physically from a club's speakers or through a SubPac, which resembles a seat cushion and allows him to feel the music by directly transferring low frequencies to the body.

    Clubgoers and promoters dubbed him "That Deaf DJ" after he first came onto the scene in New Jersey -- a moniker even he uses. But Wilde said he wants to be more than just "a deaf kid trying to DJ."

    "I want you to see me as a great DJ who happens to be deaf," he said.

    Besides, he said, some things are better left unheard.

    "There's a lot of sounds out in the world you don't want to hear. I like it muffled," he said. "I like who I am; I'm proud of who I am."

    Wilde has gone from working small clubs to rocking this year's Consumer Electronics Show and Sundance Film Festival.

    When he's not behind the turntables, Wilde is in the studio producing music.

    Often questioned about the severity of his deafness, Wilde used to carry around a doctor's note and would show the back of his driver's license indicating his hearing impairment.

    When people question his abilities, he said he has only one answer: "I didn't hear you."

    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  13. #253
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    13-year-old girl creates program to give beds those in need

    SHELBYVILLE, Ky. -- After watching the movie "The Blind Side," where an African-American football player is adopted by an all-white family and given his first bed, 13-year old Jessica Collins asked her grandmother a question: "Do you think there are people without beds?"

    Her grandmother, Lynn Whittaker's response: "I'm sure."

    Jessica Collins soon learned there was an overwhelming need in Shelby County. She helped create the program "A Place to Sleep," and in three years it has helped provide beds to more than 160 people -- many of them needy children and their families in Shelby County.

    The program has also earned Jessica recognition from the state and a letter from President Obama thanking her for her volunteer efforts.

    "I saw him not get a bed and it made me want to give people beds," said Jessica.

    Jessica then turned to her church and a furniture store in Shelbyville. Tracy's Home Furnishings agreed to provide beds at cost to those in need. Jessica gathered collections and volunteers from her church pitched in.

    "We just asked her what is it we could do to help out?" said Debbie D'Angelo, the manager at Tracy's Home Furnishings. "It makes me really emotional to think about these children not having a place to sleep -- I'm glad we are able to help out."

    Jessica says many of her teachers and classmates tell her "they are inspired and that they want to start something ... it makes me feel good."

    As shy and humble Jessica is, Sharon Garcia is just as thankful.

    "It's been very good," said Garcia, a working single mom whose children benefited from the program. "We've had a lot of good nights of sleep for the kids. Just as a single parent it's helped me out a lot.

    "It was just amazing. I got to meet the little girl and I wish my little girl would grow up to be like her when she grows up."

    Jessica says many of the recipients have endured hardships, like losing their home in a fire, bed bug infestation and abusive relationships.

    Jessica has learned the need seems constant. While nothing is official, Jessica's mother said there are rumblings of expanding her program to other school districts throughout the state.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  14. #254
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    Helping Hand

    I saw this on my way out to lunch today and though it was a small thing I was really touched by it. I saw an elderly Asian man carrying two fold-up chairs and a heavy bag struggling to get on and off an escalator. I then saw 5 strangers, two Indian guys, an older white couple, and a younger hipster girl all rush to help him and offer a hand. The old man was so appreciative and couldn’t speak any English (I think) but started bowing to say thanks to them. The smiles on the strangers faces and their willingness to help made me think that there really are nice and decent people out there. I am recently going through depression and seeing this sort of random act of kindness to people no matter what race or age, really warmed my heart.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  15. #255
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    School raises money for 6-year-old in need of new heart

    NORTH HAVEN, Conn. (WTNH) -- As the old saying goes, the pen is mightier than the sword, but the students at a North Haven elementary school hope the penny is even mightier as they go to battle for a classmate in need.

    "Is it something about your heart," asked News 8's Jeff Valin.

    "Yes," replied Matthew Jacques.

    "What do you need," asked Valin.

    "A new one," Matthew said.

    Six-year-old kindergartener Matthew Jacques already has three surgeries to his resume, including one at just 10 days old.

    "He's the million-dollar baby," said Alphonse Jacques, Matthew's father.

    For Matthew, heart failure has been a way of life and a threat to life all along, but his school mates at Montowese Elementary in North Haven are going to war for him, a "penny war." Each grade level is trying to out-do the others, raising funds for his mounting medical costs.

    "It's very challenging emotionally, financially," said Melissa Jacques, Matthew's mother.

    "We want all pennies in our jar, or dollar bills," said Lara Silvestro, Matthew's teacher. "Any silver coins deduct points, so at the end of the day we can be in the negative instead of the positive, but all said and done, the money is the money at the end of the week."

    You'd never know his troubles to look at him.

    "I'm happy," said Matthew.

    "We don't want to limit him to what he can't do, it's what he can do," Melissa said. "And I think, with that attitude, he has a great attitude towards it."

    There's no prize other than bragging rights and hopefully a life saved, which brings us to another reward that can't be counted.

    "It's taught them a sense of community and coming together to help out each other," said Silvestro.

    "To see the amount of support that we get from his teacher, from his classmates, from the school," Melissa said, it's extremely overwhelming, it's very heartfelt.

    Spare change everyone hopes can spare a life.

    "Do you think this will help you get one," asked Valin.

    "Yes," Matthew said.

    Anyone interested in learning more about how you can donate, can contact Matthew's teacher Lara Silvestro directly by e-mailing her on the school's website . http://montowese.ct.nhs.schoolinsite...ndingID=139420
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

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