Page 50 of 56 FirstFirst ... 4041424344454647484950515253545556 LastLast
Results 736 to 750 of 834

Thread: The good guys thread

  1. #736
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alaska: Where the odds are good, but the goods are odd.
    Posts
    5,564
    Mom shaves head in support of children's cancer research

    LAWRENCE, KS (KCTV) - A local mom is shaving her head bald with 45 other mothers to show their support for children's cancer research.

    The event is called 46 Mommas Shave for the Brave. The number is symbolic because statistics say that each weekday 46 moms will find out their child has cancer.

    The group of 46 mothers involved share one devastating reality – doctors diagnosed each of their kids with cancer.

    "On our team we do have a lot of mommas who have lost their children and they are some of the fiercest advocates," Karla Knudson said.

    In 2010 in Los Angeles, CA, with a goal to raise $1 million for children's cancer research, the women voluntarily shaved their heads.

    "This crowd of people they are all just crying, hooting and hollering and so moved by it," Knudson said.

    Knudson braved the shave. She did it because when her daughter Annika was 11 years old, she was diagnosed with Burkitt's lymphoma.

    "As much as I didn't understand it then, I now know how close to really death I was when I was sitting in my bed," said Annika Knudson, who is now 17 years old.

    Annika Knudson fought cancer with a smile on her face. When chemo caused her to lose her hair, she used the opportunity to try something out of the ordinary with fun and colorful wigs.

    Karla Knudson is headed to Boston on June 27 for another shave five years after her first buzz to celebrate one huge milestone – her daughter is celebrating five years of being cancer free.

    Annika Knudson says she knows not every mom would be as willing as hers to set style aside twice and lose her locks to raise money for research that could one day cure childhood cancer.

    "There is this kind of rebelliousness to it. It's like, 'take that chemotherapy. I don't have to have you to be bald,'" she said.

    It's estimated that only four percent of cancer research funding goes toward kid's cancer research. To help fill that funding gap, people can donate to the St. Baldrick's Foundation that sponsors the 46 Mommas Shave for the Brave event that will be held in Boston on July 27 this year.

    To donate to Karla Knudson's efforts to raise money for children's cancer research, click here. https://www.stbaldricks.org/particip...ge/667139/2014

    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  2. #737
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alaska: Where the odds are good, but the goods are odd.
    Posts
    5,564
    Officer steps in to help 96-year-old woman in stifling hot house

    KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) - Thanks to an officer with the Kansas City Police Department, an elderly woman who was without an air conditioner is now staying cool.

    Officer Patrick Byrd was called to Indiana Avenue when a neighbor reported to police seeing a disoriented woman in the area. When Byrd arrived, he saw 96-year-old Helen Adams outside in the heat. He offered to take her home, but realized her house did not have a working air conditioner.

    "She had a fan, but it was still very hot inside the residence," Byrd said. "At that time I asked her if she had central air or an air conditioning unit. She said the air went out a couple days ago."

    Byrd called the Bishop Sullivan Center and found out that volunteers could help Adams through their Project ElderCool program.

    "Project ElderCool is a program we've had for years now where we deliver air conditioners and install them for older persons on fixed incomes; people who can't afford a unit for themselves," said Maria Antonia, who works at the center.

    The organization also deposits $100 in recipients' accounts so they do not feel guilty about keeping the air conditioner running when it is hot outside.

    Byrd stayed with Adams while they waited for volunteers to arrive, and found out no one was checking on the elderly woman in this intense heat.

    "I stayed with her for quite some time and she shared with me that she didn't have any living relatives to check on her," he said.

    Police say this is a reminder to check on your neighbors when it is this hot, especially if they are elderly or have a medical condition.

    Click here https://www.bishopsullivan.org/donate/project-eldercool to find out more about Project ElderCool or to donate to the organization.

    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  3. #738
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alaska: Where the odds are good, but the goods are odd.
    Posts
    5,564
    Real Estate Attorney Leaves $800,000 to Shelter Cats

    Brian Russell Kirchoff loved cats.

    So the San Rafael, California, real estate attorney did something purr-fectly nice when drawing up his will: he set aside some $800,000 for cats in need at the Marin Humane Society of Novato, California.

    According to the Marin Independent Journal, Kirchoff died after suffering a heart attack last year and left a six-page handwritten will that said "any cash proceeds left shall be donated to the Marin Humane Society for the express benefit and use of their cat fund for the benefit of all the cats which come into their care."

    So far the society has received $200,000 and the rest – approximately $600,000 – will arrive before the end of the year, says John Reese, chief operating officer of the organization, who tells PEOPLE that Kirchoff wasn't intimately tied to the organization when he was alive.

    Holly Haugh, a former colleague of Kirchoff's, told the Journal that she wasn't surprised when she learned what her friend had done. "He had a passion for cats," she said, adding that the bachelor liked to call himself "Cat Daddy" when talking about his two beloved cats, Chelsea and Tarka (who reside at a Santa Rosa animal sanctuary which received $20,000 to care for them).

    The Marin Humane Society hasn't yet determined how they'll use the money, but improvement of their current cat housing could be a future project.

    "We will do very generous things for cats with his donation," Reese tells PEOPLE. "It was wonderful for him to consider his cats in the planned giving for his estates and then to also give that donation."


    Cats available at the Marin Humane Society
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  4. #739
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    13,475
    My cats are the primary beneficiaries of my will, and once they're gone, whatever remains goes to rescues and services that help other cats.

    Cat Lady here..
    I've been Frosted (thanks, Elyse and Karen!).

    I meant," said Ipslore bitterly, "what is there in this world that truly makes living worthwhile?"
    Death thought about it.
    "Cats," he said eventually. "Cats are nice."

    -- Terry Pratchett, Sourcery

  5. #740
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alaska: Where the odds are good, but the goods are odd.
    Posts
    5,564
    Tiny Chihuahua Saves Family from House Fire

    Somebody get this super dog a cape!

    A tiny Chihuahua named Chloe from Federal Way, Washington, barked until her sleeping family woke up during a house fire – and she's being credited with saving their lives.

    "My mom's little 5-lb. Chihuahua started barking when she saw the smoke," Devon Whittlesey told ABC 13 News. "Smoke was pouring into my room. I dropped down to my hands and knees and crawled to the front door."

    Whittlesey and two other residents made it out fast thanks to the barking, but Chloe wasn't so lucky.

    When part of the home collapsed in flames, they thought the dog was gone forever. An hour later, firefighters discovered the pooch alive in the rubble, covered in ash, according to ABC 13.

    "Chloe saved us," Whittlesey said. "We wouldn't have lived. If the flames wouldn't have got us, the smoke would've."

    Despite her size, Chloe is being hailed a giant hero. "She's got 250 lbs. in that little 4-lb. body," said Chloe's other owner, Tracie Fox. "No doubt she saved us."
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  6. #741
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alaska: Where the odds are good, but the goods are odd.
    Posts
    5,564
    Return of an Earth Angel
    After being rescued two years before, she prayed that she might one day thank the young man who came to her aid. It was a prayer quickly answered.
    By Helen Chade Mahshi, San Clemente, California

    Waves lapped against the shore as I walked along the beach. The ocean was calm, but looking out at it I shivered, remembering a day two years before. I’d left my daughter, Anastasia, relaxing on the sand while I went for a swim. I got caught in a riptide that swiftly took me deep into the ocean.

    The harder I fought, the more exhausted I got. But I didn’t get any closer to shore. Was Anastasia going to watch me drown? “God, I need help!” I gasped, barely able to keep my mouth above the water.

    A young man appeared in the surf. “Hang on to me,” he said. He sliced through the water with powerful strokes. We rode a wave in together until we stumbled onto the sand, his arm supporting me as I collapsed into the embrace of my daughter.

    I hugged Anastasia tight and gulped in sweet sea air. By the time I looked up the man was gone. Anastasia couldn’t say which way he went.

    I hope that man knows how grateful I am to this day, I thought, turning away from my memory. I stepped aside as someone came jogging down the beach–a young man who looked very familiar.

    “You may not remember, but you once saved my life!” I said when he got close. “Thank you!”

    He grinned, shyly. “You’re welcome!”

    With another prayer answered, he was gone.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  7. #742
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alaska: Where the odds are good, but the goods are odd.
    Posts
    5,564
    Kansas City woman sews Angel Gowns for parents using donated wedding dresses

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. - If you frequent garage sales around town, you may have run into John Wright. Address list in hand, the 81- year-old Kansas City grandfather plots out his stops in advance of walking up homeowners’ driveways filled with treasures they’re hoping to sell.

    John has been going to garage sales for a decade. Upon his arrival, it doesn’t take long for him to locate the homeowner to ask one simple question: "Do you have any wedding dresses?"

    “I went to a garage sale in Belton one day,” John explained to 41 Action News. “I was talking to the lady and I showed her a little flyer and she said, 'Stand right there, don’t move.'"

    The woman went inside her house and brought out an old, used wedding dress. It was exactly what John was seeking.

    “She was married to the man for 18 years and it turned out he wasn’t a very nice fella,” John said. “She said she can’t stand to look at the wedding dress, so she couldn’t think of a better use to put the dress to than make something meaningful.”

    Along with collecting coffee mugs and toys he donates to people in need, John gathers wedding gowns to give to his wife, Diane. She then washes them, cuts them apart, and sews them into tiny gowns.

    Delicate gowns that are about to serve a new purpose as burial gowns for deceased newborns.

    “I’ve probably gotten 15 out of one dress,” Diane said. “But most of the time it's closer to eight and I try to do the four different sizes.”

    Diane makes various different sizes to fit babies at various stages of gestation. She also makes a small little pocket, or wrap, with ties for the newborns that are too small to wear clothes.

    “There’s always a variety. And then after I do some then I go back and any little scrap I have left will take whatever pattern I have and see what will fit and make that particular size."

    Diane donates gowns she makes to area hospitals, like Saint Luke’s East. Nurses then give them to parents whose newborn babies did not survive.

    “I’ve had a miscarriage and we’ve lost a child so I understand that grief,” Diane told 41 Action News with tears welling up in her eyes.

    Diane and John also revealed they recently lost a son who drowned during a military exercise.

    Angelee True is a nurse in the labor and delivery unit at St. Luke’s East Hospital in Lee’s Summit, Mo.

    “Not all families have a happy experience when they come here. We do have families that lose babies due to miscarriage or still birth or at all different stages of gestation,” Angelee explained.

    “We have been trained to take care of those families and it's always difficult,” Angelee said while standing in an empty patient room. “It’s never easy by any means.”

    “We get patients who come in for an induction or just a regular appointment who say they haven’t felt the baby move as much as normal and the baby has passed and it's a total shock to them."

    It’s a shock that's a bit less painful for parents thanks to people like John and Diane.

    “The parents would have to go buy something,” Diane said. “I can’t imagine how hard that would be to go and buy a burial gown.”

    John added, “When I look at them I just … my throat closes up. I get so emotional about it.”

    Diane says a prayer over every gown. She’s never met the recipients of her gowns or Angelee, but hospital staff has witnessed the parents’ overwhelming response.

    “What they’re doing is extremely important and what they’re doing means a lot more than what they can ever know,” Angelee said.

    “If you have faith in God and faith in helping other people, then that’s what we’re here for,” John added while sitting in his living room.

    “I’m 81 years old. I don’t know how much time I have left, but I’d like for it to have meaning.”

    If you have a wedding dress you’d like to donate to John and Diane Wright, send it to Grandview United Methodist Church, 12613 Grandview Road in Grandview, Mo.

    You can also contact the volunteer coordinator at Saint Luke’s East Hospital at 816-347-8532.
    http://www.kshb.com/news/kansas-city-woman-sews-angel-gowns-for-parents-using-donated-wedding-dresses?hpt=us_bn9
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  8. #743
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alaska: Where the odds are good, but the goods are odd.
    Posts
    5,564
    Two young girls donate nearly 500 inspirational bracelets to cancer patients

    HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) - Two young girls who are best friends know what it is like to have a mother diagnosed with cancer. They've now banded together to put a positive spin on a challenging situation.

    Five years ago, Lindsay Mosamery, 11, found out her mother Julie Mosamery was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer.

    This past May, Lindsey's friend Keeley Joyal, 10, found out her mother Katie Joyal was diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer.

    Both Lindsey and Keeley, from Somers, wanted to give Joyal something inspirational to take with her to chemotherapy treatments, so they decided to make rubber band bracelets that Joyal could wear throughout her treatments.

    Now, after the girls involved their classmates in their efforts, they have been able to collect hundreds of bracelets with inspirational messages attached to give to cancer patients at Hartford Hospital.

    The girls have named their cause "The Bouncing Back Club," and on Thursday they donated close to 500 bracelets to cancer patients at Hartford Hospital.

    "I think it makes them feel good. You know, it's nice to see children giving back to the community and bringing cancer awareness to their friends and to patients," Julie Mosamery said.

    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  9. #744
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alaska: Where the odds are good, but the goods are odd.
    Posts
    5,564
    Heroes Among Us
    Bill & Muriel Elliott Help Crack Down on Drunk Drivers to Honor Their Son

    The knock on the door that changed Bill and Muriel Elliott's life forever came at 4 a.m. on Saturday, July 22, 2000.

    It was the police – with some devastating news.

    "They told us our son had been killed in a collision with a drunk driver," Bill, 64, tells PEOPLE. "My wife went down to answer the door because we were asleep and I heard her screaming."

    John, 22, had graduated from the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, just two months earlier and was working there as an instructor. That night, he got off duty around 10 p.m. and headed north to his parents' home in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, to celebrate his mother's birthday. The accident happened in Woodstown, New Jersey.

    The driver of the car that hit John died in the accident. He had been drinking for 10 hours straight – and had a blood alcohol level of 0.23 at the time of the crash. The man had been arrested and charged with driving while intoxicated two hours before the accident but was released to the custody of a friend, who let him drive again.

    "We experienced every parent's worst nightmare," Bill says.

    But the Elliotts were determined to make some good come from the tragedy. That same year, they founded the HERO Campaign, a nonprofit devoted to cracking down on drunk drivers.

    "Out of that incredible heartbreak, we wanted to do everything we could to prevent this tragedy from happening to other families," says Bill, a retired hospital vice president.

    The HERO Campaign promotes the use of designated drivers by registering volunteers to drive home those who have been drinking. It partners with law enforcement agencies, colleges, bars and taverns, restaurants, sports teams, state divisions of highway safety, the U.S. Naval Academy and community chapters across the country.

    Rodney Brewer, commissioner of the Kentucky State Police, says he's seen a drop in fatality rates since partnering with the nonprofit in December 2012.

    "I can't let the HERO Campaign have all of the credit, but I will tell you I think they are a major part of the equation," Brewer tells PEOPLE.

    Bill and Muriel also worked with the New Jersey State Police to get John's Law passed in 2001. The legislation gives police there the authority to seize the vehicles of suspected drunk drivers and hold them for up to 12 hours.

    Laura and Michael Horne, who lost their son Chad to a drunk driver in January 2010, say they are grateful to the Elliotts for all their advocacy efforts.

    "When you lose a child in such a tragic way, it can either make you or break you as far as staying together as a family," Laura, 49, of Freehold, New Jersey, tells PEOPLE.

    "I attribute the survival of my family to Bill and Muriel Elliott and this campaign because I don't know if we would have done without it, honestly," says Laura, who volunteers for the group.

    Muriel says the HERO Campaign has helped keep memories of their son alive.

    "John was always a positive person; he made you laugh," says the retired first-grade teacher, 64. "John would probably laugh at some of the funny things along the way, like being grand marshals at the NASCAR race – we know that he probably would have loved that."

    Bill says drunk driving should be taken more seriously because it can devastate anyone out of the blue – just like it did to to them.

    "I think the view is like lightning could strike and it will happen to somebody else but it won't happen to them," says Bill. "But lightning struck our family when they came knocking on our door that morning."

    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  10. #745
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alaska: Where the odds are good, but the goods are odd.
    Posts
    5,564
    Heroes Among Us
    Houston Socialite Kristi Schiller Helps Cops – and Dogs! – Fight Crime

    In December 2009, Kristi Schiller saw a story on the local TV news that devastated her.

    The K-9 unit dog of Deputy Constable Ted Dahlin, of Harris County, Texas, had been strangled to death by a burglary suspect.

    "This poor officer," Schiller, 44, tells PEOPLE. "It was a member of his family, and this dog died protecting him."

    So Schiller – a Houston wife, mom and animal lover whose four dogs go everywhere with her – decided to get him another one.

    In December 2009, Kristi Schiller saw a story on the local TV news that devastated her.

    The K-9 unit dog of Deputy Constable Ted Dahlin, of Harris County, Texas, had been strangled to death by a burglary suspect.

    "This poor officer," Schiller, 44, tells PEOPLE. "It was a member of his family, and this dog died protecting him."

    So Schiller – a Houston wife, mom and animal lover whose four dogs go everywhere with her – decided to get him another one.

    Keep up with your favorite celebs in the pages of PEOPLE Magazine by subscribing now.


    "I didn't want the dog to die in vain," she says.

    She soon found out it wasn't that easy.

    After pitching her idea to as high up as the Texas governor, Schiller quickly learned that an individual can't just give a police department a K-9, due to complex departmental policies coupled with the steep price of training. It costs a minimum of $10,000 to purchase and train one dog, and K-9 units are usually the first go in budget cuts.

    But Schiller didn't let that stop her.

    In 2010, she created K9s4COPS, a nonprofit that provides K-9s trained in narcotics, explosives and firearms detection to police across the country.

    To date, 60 of her trained dogs are catching bad guys for police departments in 17 states, and she has a waiting list with no fewer than 85 officers on it.

    Some $47.6 million worth of narcotics and 97 guns have been seized with the help of K9s4COPS dogs.

    "This is a great thing she's doing," says Charles Mesloh, a K-9 expert and criminal justice professor at Northern Michigan University. "I'm not aware of any other [program like Schiller's]."

    Schiller, meanwhile, says it's a labor of love.

    "I sat on 13 different boards when I started this," reveals Schiller, a native Texan with a colorful past as a radio broadcaster and Playboy model, "and I got off every single one because I felt so passionate about moving forward with this."

    Barking Up Funds
    Initially funding her mission out of her own pocket, Schiller has since raised more than $2.4 million for her charity.

    That support has gone a long way.

    When Houston County Deputy John Walker's longtime partner, Bosco, retired, his department didn't have funding to replace the dog.

    Walker faced the possibility of finishing his career as a dogless patrolman when Schiller came to the rescue, donating Gorbi, a German shepherd, to him in 2011.

    "He's a part of me," Walker says of his new partner.


    Class Act
    Schiller, a gun owner and NRA member, is also deeply opposed to an effort in Texas and other states to allow teachers to carry guns in schools, fearing they will do more harm than good.

    Prompted by the December 2012 Newtown school shooting, Schiller started K9s4KIDS, which donates gun- and drug-detecting dogs to protect schools.

    So far, K9s4KIDS has placed trained dogs in five Texas schools, and another is being trained for a private school on Long Island, New York.

    Westside Elementary School music teacher Parrish Gayle says that having a dog around her Angleton, Texas, school "adds tremendously" to the safety procedures put in place after Newtown.

    "A dog makes you pause, and he's a huge deterrent that helps you feel safe," she says.

    When Schiller first contacted Dahlin following the loss of his dog, he was skeptical of the socialite's idea. That perception quickly changed.

    "She is an amazing person," says Dahlin, who no longer works with dogs but sits on her board of directors.

    "I could never have imagined something this great coming from such a tragic situation."
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  11. #746
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alaska: Where the odds are good, but the goods are odd.
    Posts
    5,564
    Praying with Mimi
    Who would have thought that my most consistent prayer partner would be a four-legged friend?
    By Anne Simpkinson, New York, New York

    I start my day with prayer. Centering prayer, in which, rather than saying prayers aloud, you sit in silence, letting go of thoughts and distractions and resting in God. The point isn’t to talk to God, or even to listen to him, but to simply be with him.

    Early every morning after I feed the cats, I settle into the big gray overstuffed armchair tucked in a corner of my bedroom by a window.

    First I read a devotion from one of the books I keep beside the chair. Then I put the book down and hit the start button on the meditation timer app I downloaded onto my phone. A soft bell chimes, signaling the beginning of my 20 minutes of prayer.

    I close my eyes, repeat a sacred word two or three times then sit in silence. The sixteenth-century mystic Saint John of the Cross wrote that God’s first language is silence. I’ve chosen centering prayer as a way to connect with God–beyond words, beyond thoughts, beyond emotions.

    Centering prayer has been my spiritual practice for almost 20 years, one that’s seen me through many changes–my divorce, my parents’ deaths, several moves, new jobs. A constant through the inevitable ups and downs of life.

    I was content with my practice. But then one day a friend and I were discussing our prayer lives. She happened to mention that when she sat on her sofa to pray every morning, her cat joined her. My reaction was instantaneous... and not very Christian. I was green with envy!

    My friend certainly hadn’t trained her cat (who can?), so I reasoned that she must exude such a peaceful aura that her cat couldn’t resist basking in it. Obviously, I was less holy, less spiritual than she was.

    My two cats did nothing like that when I prayed. They nibbled at their breakfast. Stood sentinel at the window, watching for birds. Lounged in their favorite spots in the living room. Groomed themselves. They did what cats do.

    And I did what we humans often do. I let my feelings of inadequacy niggle at me for a while. I wondered why my connection to God was somehow lacking. Then I got caught up in the busyness of my day-to-day life and forgot about my friend’s feline prayer partner.

    Until one morning about a year ago. I was sitting in my big gray chair, eyes closed in prayer, when I felt one of my cats leap onto its overstuffed arm and slowly walk across my lap.

    I kept my eyes shut, trying to stay centered. But it was hard not to be distracted when my cat turned and walked across my lap the other way. Which cat was it? I took a peek.

    It was Mimi, my nine-year-old tuxedo cat. She stretched out next to me, settling herself against my left side, and rested her head on my thigh. She lay there, completely relaxed. Completely still.

    I closed my eyes again. I listened to the gentle rhythm of Mimi’s breath. I let the soft warmth of her body seep into me. And something about her stillness seeped into me as well, lulling me, pulling me deeper into silence, into peace.

    Since that day, every morning when I sit in my comfy chair to pray, Mimi has joined me. As soon as the meditation bell chimes, she pads into the room, jumps up on the chair and nestles against me. Then we both settle down, close our eyes and rest in the presence of God.

    After all, didn’t Jesus say, “Where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them”?
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  12. #747
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alaska: Where the odds are good, but the goods are odd.
    Posts
    5,564
    CLEVELAND, OH (WOIO) - Two lots where abandoned homes once sat were turned into open space park areas today on Cleveland's West side. They are situated between the home of Gina DeJesus who was one of three women who were held captive for ten years before they escaped last spring.

    Kelly Weiss says the parks are a way to help neighbors and the DeJesus family heal from those emotional wounds.

    "The DeJesus family has been through a lot and so has this neighborhood.'''

    The parks are called Camden Community Place which covers open spaces where abandoned homes once sat. Norma Sanovich says those abandoned homes attracted crime.

    "I don't want to be scared to come out of my house because there has been a shooting in the neighborhood so yes that's why I did all this,'' Sanovich said.

    All the resources from the park were donated free of charge with no help from the city.

    ''That's what it takes, neighbors taking care of neighbors.''

    The band ''Heaven's Best Kept Secret'' helped to kick off today's dedication, which has neighbors moving away from the past and toward the promise of a new day.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  13. #748
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alaska: Where the odds are good, but the goods are odd.
    Posts
    5,564
    Police Officer Saves Baby's Life, Attends Her Wedding 20 Years Later
    "This is one job you don't forget about."

    New York police officer Capt. Joseph Barca first met Shammarah Hamideh 20 years ago, when she was two months old and choking to death. Barca saved her life that day, and now, two decades later, he's back--not to rescue her, but to watch her get married.

    "He's very considerate," Hamideh told the Journal News. "Every year on my birthday, he sends me a card and a check. They treat me like I'm their daughter."

    Hamideh will marry in Chicago later this month. Barca is set to attend with his wife, Helen; he'll have the opportunity to celebrate Hamideh's big day--a day that, were it not for him, Hamideh might not have survived to see.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  14. #749
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alaska: Where the odds are good, but the goods are odd.
    Posts
    5,564
    PHOENIX -- A critically injured dog found lying on the side of the road in Phoenix is recovering at a no-kill shelter.

    Phoenix Police Officer Gary Potts found the Rottweiler, later named Abe, near 28th and Van Buren streets and took him to the Arizona Animal Welfare League & SPCA's veterinary clinic.

    The dog, believed to be about 6 years old, was covered in lacerations and had a large gash across his head. A section of muscle had been torn from his back leg, and one of his ears was almost completely severed.

    A veterinarian determined Abe was most likely attacked by a group of dogs.

    The veterinarian and clinic staff cleaned and sewed Abe's wounds and were able to reattach a large portion of his ear. They worked on and watched over him from the time he arrived shortly after 7 a.m. until about 8 p.m.

    Abe eventually moved into an employee's office and, although shy and under medication, has started to greet people in the hallway.

    "Every animal deserves a chance for a happy and healthy life and, although this is an extreme case, it is the core of what AAWL & SPCA does day in and day out," President and CEO Judith Gardner said in a statement.

    Abe will be available for adoption once sufficiently recovered.

    [img]http://media.azfamily.com/images/470*264/8-13-14-INJURED-ROTTWEILER-ABE.jpg[/img]
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  15. #750
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alaska: Where the odds are good, but the goods are odd.
    Posts
    5,564
    AZ man walks thousands of miles picking up litter

    PHOENIX (CBS5) - Long before the sun is high in the sky, Jerry Meyers, 72, is on the move.

    I wear out a couple pair of shoes a year, two or three," Meyers said.

    What started out as a recommendation from his doctor for exercise has turned into an 8-year ritual, walking Recker Road in Mesa every morning and picking up litter along the way.

    "I usually got a sack that I look for stuff, you know. I haven't seen anything yet here," Meyers said.

    "I've had people stop and wanted to give me a ride and I said, 'no, I just enjoy the exercise," Meyers recalled.

    Jack Carlson happened to drive by Meyers several years ago and something in him told him to stop.

    "I'll be darn, there's Jerry walking and a little light went on and I said, 'Jack, why don't you get to know this guy and find out what you can do,'" Carlson said.

    What he found out was the two Midwestern guys with military backgrounds had a lot in common.

    They soon became friends and that's when Carlson decided to do the math on Meyers' jaunts.

    "It's between 7,000 and 8,000 miles, which to me is very impressive," Carlson said.

    Not to mention the tons of trash that are no longer on the street, so Carlson wanted to pay it forward to his friend.

    Carlson, with the help of CBS 5's Pay It Forward program, presented Meyers with $500 cash.

    Meyers has always been an active guy, playing and coaching several softball teams over the years. But diabetes has slowed him down these days.

    "I have people wave and honk at me and I don't know who they are. They're nice and friendly people and I try to wave when I can," Meyers said.

    While he doesn't think his litter walks are any big deal, he has developed a philosophy from the people he bumps into and says it's helped him trudge on when the shoes are worn and the days are hot.

    "People are nice people regardless of your age or what you look like or clothes they wear. It's the person inside," Meyers said. "Live a normal life and help one another out if you can."

    Meyers tried to donate the money right back to Carlson's church, but Carlson made him keep it, if only to buy shoes for several more years of community service.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Ask your vet about Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Copyright © 2001-2013 Pet of the Day.com