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Thread: The good guys thread

  1. #496
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    From People Magazine Heroes Among Us:


    COLLEGE STUDENT MARIAN NEAL, 40
    Broke and out of a job, she gives a child the gift of life

    Troubled by back problems in 1996, Marian Neal gave up her job handling freight in Washington, D.C., for a shipping company. Broke and homeless, she moved in with a friend two years later in nearby Alexandria, Va. There she befriended Terrance Varner, a 7-year-old who lived with his grandmother Elaine Harris and whose kidneys were failing. To keep her little friend company, Neal, now 40, often accompanied him on his three weekly trips to dialysis at Washington's Children's National Medical Center. "I saw all the suffering the children went through there," she recalls, "and wondered what I could do to help." Then she had an idea.

    Last December, Neal donated one of her kidneys to Terrance—an unusual offering in that only 4 percent of transplants come from people unrelated by blood or marriage. Thankfully medical tests showed that Neal and Terrance were a match.

    "I didn't think it was a big step," says Neal. "I just wanted Terrance to be able to eat, drink and play like a normal boy." Grandmother Harris saw the December operation as a much bigger deal. "It's the best Christmas present I could ever have," she told The Washington Post.

    Good deed aside, Neal again found herself homeless last August when her friend's brother moved back in. But her plight did not go unnoticed. Hearing about Neal, U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Andrew Cuomo secured a one-bedroom apartment for her in Southwest D.C. Says Cuomo: "In an age when many people think only about themselves, she was totally selfless."

    In addition to the apartment, Neal also received a free car from a local auto dealer so she could drive to classes at Northern Virginia Community College, where she is studying to become a social worker. "I made a way for Terrance," says Neal gratefully, "and God made a way for me."

    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Consider having your cat tested for Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  2. #497
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    A Ticket to Life
    He was about to undergo major surgery. Why was his dog acting so strangely?
    By Allen Anderson, Minneapolis, Minnesota

    A strip of glossy paper, torn from yet another magazine, dangled from our little black cocker spaniel’s clenched teeth. I knelt down to tug the soggy, rectangular scrap from his mouth. “Come on, boy.” He relaxed his jaw and looked up with innocent eyes. I glared at him, frustrated.

    Now? Why are you doing this now? Nothing, it seemed, could stop Leaf’s new bad habit. And he’d always been such a good dog! I held the slimy slip he’d dropped into my hand up to the light, reading the disjointed words and numbers printed on it as if they held some clue to his odd new behavior.

    Each time he pulled this stunt it was the same thing: a slip of paper, not chewed or shredded, which he brought to me. “Ready to go?” my wife, Linda, asked, interrupting my inspection.

    “Leaf’s at it again,” I said, showing her.

    Linda slipped an arm around me. “Don’t worry about it. You know how scared he gets. He probably just doesn’t want you to go.”

    Neither do I, I thought.

    The hospital. That’s where Linda and I were headed. A sterile monolithic building where a surgeon was going to operate on my brain. I’d complained of headaches and blurred vision. Doctors had found an aneurysm, fatal if it ruptured.

    I’d undergone tests, taken an MRI, a CT scan, had met with my surgeon and scheduled the operation, all while putting on the same brave face I wore as an officer for the Atlanta Police Department. I’d been in life-threatening situations my entire career, but this time, my bravery was a front.

    In truth, I was terrified. Lately, a recurring nightmare confirmed my darkest fears: I was going to die.

    I remembered the first night the scene unfolded before me. I was watching an endless snaking line of people, waiting to get inside a vast, domed building. Everyone I knew was there: Linda, family and friends, coworkers, people I recognized from church.

    Slowly, one by one, they went through an entrance of what people in line were calling the Building of Life.

    Each person held a ticket, as if for a concert. I pushed my way into the line, hoping that no one would notice I had no ticket. Everyone glared at me. Some said, “You do not belong here.” The line moved past me, leaving me behind. No! Terror ripped through me. I want to be with Linda! I want to live!
    I woke up, my body shaking, my pillow drenched with sweat. The message couldn’t have been clearer. My life was over. I must have woken Leaf because he jumped onto the bed next to me. I wrapped my arms around him. It felt strange, him comforting me.

    Usually it was the other way around. Linda and I had adopted Leaf from a shelter six months earlier. We’d given him his name because he’d seemed as fragile as an autumn leaf trembling in the breeze. Leaf had been abandoned, and his skittishness made us wonder if he’d been abused by a former owner.

    We kept a blanket on the floor by our bed for him to lie on, and he sometimes woke in the middle of the night with bad dreams, whimpering and crying pitifully. I’d roll out of bed and flick on a nightlight, then take him into my office and hold him in my arms until he calmed down.

    “It’s okay, boy,” I’d say softly. “You’re safe now.”

    But Leaf had never been destructive or acted out, not until just recently. The more anxious I got about the surgery, the more Leaf went on a shredding binge, tearing up newspapers, magazines, anything readable we left lying around.

    He’d rip up a sheaf of paper and bring me some scrap covered with saliva, always one tiny scrap, looking at me with his deep, dark eyes. “No, Leaf, no,” I’d say, over and over. He didn’t seem to get it. Even as I headed out the door to the hospital, he just stood there, staring at me earnestly.

    I shivered, sitting on the cold, starched sheet of the hospital bed, prepped for surgery: my head shaved, hospital gown wrapped loosely around me. Soon I’d be whisked off to the O.R. Linda leaned forward in her chair and we held hands, bowing our heads, praying. But my fear wouldn’t leave me.

    What if this is it? Our last minutes together? Then it was time. Linda kissed me and I watched her go, just as a chaplain came in for a final prayer. She held my hand. “Trust in God,” she said. “Relax in his love.”

    These words echoed in my mind on the way to the O.R. I closed my eyes. That’s when I saw Leaf’s face projected on the backs of my eyelids. He held a sliver of paper in his mouth. In my inner vision I reached out as Leaf dropped it into my hands.

    I knew what it was. Those cropped letters and numbers that lined the deliberately torn scrap, they hadn’t made any sense before. But now they did.

    A ticket. That was what Leaf was giving me. The nightmares that plagued him, and me—had Leaf seen what I’d seen? Impossible. Yet I was sure of it. Surer than I’d ever been of anything. I’m going to make it, I thought. I will awaken and enter the Building of Life.
    Ten days later I came home, stitches running from the center of my skull to below one ear. Bruises covered the right side of my face. Surgery had been a complete success. And Leaf? His paper-shredding ended as quickly as it had begun. He never did it again.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Consider having your cat tested for Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  3. #498
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    Loyalty is Priceless

    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Consider having your cat tested for Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  4. #499
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    Firefighter's Actions Bring Cat Back to Life After House Fire


    Talk about having nine lives!

    After her home in Stratford, east London, caught fire, Gert, a 4-year-old pet cat, was found lying motionless by firefighters who responded to the blaze on Sept. 28. Her owner, Michael Morrison, begged responders to save his cat's life, and lucky for him, some quick thinking managed to do just that.

    "It was horrible. I collapsed on the floor crying," Morrison said. "They were all huddled around her and even took my oxygen mask off for her."

    The move restarted Gert's breathing, and she was taken to the Celia Hammond Animal Trust center to continue recuperating. When she arrived, the cat had to be placed in an oxygen tent for two days and fed through tubes in her stomach. Since then, she's relearned how to move her legs, pull herself back into her kennel and lick food.

    "When she came in, we had no idea whether she would regain any normal functions," said Kylie Simons, a veterinary surgeon from Celia Hammond. "But she has come on in leaps and bounds ... Although she is still wobbly we hope that she will regain full normality in time."
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Consider having your cat tested for Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  5. #500
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    Man with muscular dystrophy finishes marathon after nearly 17 hours

    Maickel Melamed, a 38-year-old man with muscular dystrophy, finished the Chicago Marathon in 16 hours, 46 minutes, early Monday (10/14/13) morning.

    Melamed, who traveled to Chicago from Caracas, Venezuela, to take part in the marathon, was the last person to finish the race, according to NBC Chicago. Surrounding him were 100 or so supporters who cheered him on as he crossed the finish line at 1:30 in the morning.

    "If you dream it, make it happen," Melamed said after completing the race, according to WLS-TV Chicago. "Your life is the most beautiful thing that can happen to you. So make the best of it."

    Melamed began running marathons two years ago, WLS reported. He previously competed in races in New York and Berlin. According to an Indiegogo page for Melamed, doctors believed he would live only seven days after being born.


    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Consider having your cat tested for Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  6. #501
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    Mysterious Ways: Woman's Best Friend
    She had no interest in adopting a dog. But one pooch took an interest in her.
    By Doris Richardson, High Springs, Florida

    Admittedly, the house had been quiet since my husband died, but I didn’t want a dog. I had enough responsibilities as an elementary school principal. Besides, no dog could ever replace Kash, my childhood best friend.

    I only went with my friend Dee to the animal shelter for pet adoption day because when she gets an idea she’s like, well, a dog with a bone. I figured she’d drop it once she saw I had no interest.

    But one dog took an interest in me. He came right up and looked at me plaintively, imploringly. Some sort of cattle-dog mix, with reddish-brown fur and a white stripe that ran from the back of his head down to his salt-and-pepper muzzle. I gave him a pat and shooed him away.

    He didn’t go. When I tried to walk away, he followed, as if he was herding me. “I guess your dog found you,” Dee laughed.

    “Not hardly,” I said. “He’s not for me.”

    No dog ever would be after Kash. He was a mixed breed, the kind we called a Heinz 57 variety back in Opp, Alabama. Those were lean times and my parents worked long hours.

    I would have been lonely without Kash. He watched me jump rope, listened as I read from my schoolbooks and sat with me by the dirt road, waiting for my folks to come home. He was smart, affectionate and made me laugh. It devastated me when he died. I vowed never to get another dog.

    This mutt, though...no amount of coaxing could pry him from my side. He even barked at other dogs, keeping them away. “Come on, Doris, you can’t say no,” Dee begged.

    “Try him for the weekend,” the shelter worker said. “Bring him back Monday if things don’t work out.”

    “Okay,” I said to the persistent dog. “You get a weekend. No more.”

    The dog kept me company as I did my chores. I laughed, watching him surge through the piles of autumn leaves on a walk around the neighborhood. That first night he curled up by my side. And all at once I felt like we were a pair, like the house wasn’t so empty anymore.

    On Monday, I returned to the shelter—to finalize the adoption.

    “Have you named him yet?” the worker asked. I admitted I hadn’t.

    Well, if you’re interested,” she said, “his last owner called him Kash.”

    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Consider having your cat tested for Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  7. #502
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    Oh my gosh!! I was not expecting that ending to the story ^^. It brought tears to my eyes, big time!!!
    Our goal in life should be - to be as good a person as our dog thinks we are.

    Thank you for the siggy, Michelle!

    Cindy (Human) - Taz (RB Tabby) - Zoee (Australian Shepherd) - Paizly (Dilute Tortie) - Taggart (Aussie Mix) - Jax (Brown & White Tabby)

  8. #503
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    Comfort Kits

    A hospital stay can be quite frightening for anyone – but imagine how a child feels, being away from home and family, in a strange bed, not feeling well.

    Hospitalized children need to be loved and touched by comfort. That’s why Guideposts Outreach has created the Comfort Kit - a small box with a huge impact. Distributed to children by the hospital chaplains, nurses, child life, or volunteers, the Comfort Kit is filled with special items to turn a child’s hospital experience into a meaningful time; and to fill it, to whatever extent possible, with joy.

    Inside, the child finds a cuddly stuffed star named Sparkle, an “I’m Special” bracelet, stickers, a stress ball, crayons, a parent feedback card, a stand up prayer card and a personalized name tag to mount on the wall (so that doctors and nurses can call the child by their first name)—and best of all, a special journal that kids use to help them process their feelings and help them find the strength that lies within.

    This much-beloved program has distributed over 100,000 Comfort Kits over the last six years. Medical staff members and parents especially are grateful for the way Comfort Kits really do provide a source of comfort and joy to the young patients. One parent shared:

    “Logan is 2 years old and having the plush star from the Comfort Kit was a great comfort. He slept with it every night and it went into surgery with him. He also liked the stress ball. Thank you so much for the Comfort Kit! Logan’s father was just deployed to Afghanistan and Logan was facing emergency surgery all in the same week! The Comfort Kit helped us both and was much appreciated!”

    For more information on Guideposts for Kids Comfort Kits, please visit us at comfortkits.org.


    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Consider having your cat tested for Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  9. #504
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    A waiter at a Boston-area restaurant witnessed an act of kindness on Tuesday night that's warmed hearts across the internet.

    "While waiting tables tonight, a mother and daughter started crying mid-meal. I had no idea what happened until a single guy at the table next to them handed me this note [**] with his bill," wrote the waiter in a Reddit post. "Faith in humanity, restored."

    HuffPost reached out to the waiter, who clarified that he couldn't confirm the relationship between the two women, but he was fairly certain they were mother and daughter. After they'd ordered, the woman whom the waiter believes was the daughter took a phone call. Both women then started crying.

    What happened next was truly heartwarming:

    The single guy who had been sitting next to them had been friendly to me all evening, making jokes and such. When he was finished I gave him his check, and inside the billfold was his credit card and the note that I took a picture of. I combined the 2 checks, and he paid for both. I waited until after he had left to tell them their check had been taken care of. The mother was overwhelmed with gratitude, as was I. It was a great evening.

    We're glad people like this man exist in the world.


    ** Elyse here: I can't copy the picture, but the note says, "Do me a favor and bring me their check too. Someone just got diagnosed."
    Here's a link: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/1...n_4109542.html
    Yikes! I've been Boo'd ... right off of the stage!
    Aaahh, I have been defrosted! Thank you, Bonny and Asiel!
    Brrrr, I've been Frosted! Thank you, Asiel and Pomtzu!


    "That's the power of kittens (and puppies too, of course): They can reduce us to quivering masses of Jell-O in about two seconds flat and make us like it. Good thing they don't have opposable thumbs or they'd surely have taken over the world by now." -- Paul Lukas

    Cassie's Catster page: http://www.catster.com/cats/448678

  10. #505
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    Elyse ~ Wonderful story that goes a long way to prove there are angels all around us. It feels so wonderful to do something nice for someone else.
    Sharing another restaurant story that just made the news.



    Ellen DeGeneres Gives $10,000 to Waitress Who Paid Soldiers' Tab

    A New Hampshire waitress who picked up the lunch tab of two National Guard soldiers affected by the federal government's shutdown has been repaid – more than 300 times over – by television star Ellen DeGeneres.

    Sarah Hoidahl, a waitress in Concord, N.H., just wanted to do a nice thing for the soldiers, so she paid for their lunch. It cost her $27.75. On Friday, DeGeneres squared the tab and then some, giving Hoidahl $27.75 in cash and a check for $10,000.

    An emotional Hoidahl buried her face in her hands and thanked DeGeneres as the talk show host repeated, "You're a good person."

    DeGeneres caught wind of Hoidahl's act of kindness when the New Hampshire National Guard posted a picture on its Facebook page. The story spread quickly online, producers saw it and invited Hoidahl to Hollywood. Ellen also gave her a 50-inch television.

    Last edited by kuhio98; 10-21-2013 at 07:27 PM.
    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Consider having your cat tested for Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  11. #506
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    Grateful boy dresses up as his doctor for Halloween

    SEATTLE -- A Seattle surgeon made such a huge impact on a second grader that the little boy decided to honor the doctor for Halloween.

    Of all the costumes 7-year-old Landon Browne could have picked for Halloween, he didn't go for Spiderman, a fireman, a ninja or a warrior. Instead, he showed up to Seattle Children's Hospital on Wednesday dressed as Dr. Jay Rubinstein.

    Browne hears pretty well for a deaf child. And what he lacks in hearing, the precocious and gifted child makes up for in smarts.

    "I'm pretty smart," he said. "I don't mean to be not humble."

    On Wednesday, Browne showed up at the hospital wearing a lab coat, just like the one Rubinstein wore when he performed the two Cochlear implant operations on Browne.

    "Well, he worked on both my ears and he's a great surgeon," Browne said.

    Rubinstein performed the first surgery when Browne was just nine months old. Browne became an important part of the doctor's research, and last summer he added a Cochlear implant to the child's left ear.

    "I'm pretty grateful to him for all the efforts he's made on our behalf, and for him to do this makes it clear that he feels the same way," Rubinstein said.

    Rubinstein is now helping develop advances in the way implant patients hear music. They often struggle following melodies and deciphering changes in pitch.

    "I do like beat boxing," Browne said.

    Browne's dad is a musician and his mom is hopeful about what her son will one day hear thanks to Dr. Rubinstein.

    "I completely got goosebumps, because who would want their child to not experience the beauty of music," said Browne's mom, Alysia Browne.

    Browne said if he didn't go with the Dr. Rubinstein costume he probably would have dressed up like a vampire or a prince.


    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Consider having your cat tested for Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  12. #507
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    Good Samaritans get repossessed car back for fallen Tampa police officer's mom

    A couple of Good Samaritans got a repossessed car back for fallen Tampa police officer Jeff Kocab's mom.

    "That car represents part of Jeff," said Dave Williams. "So she’s got Jeff back in a way."

    Williams along with Kevin Crofton surprised Sandy Kocab with a $3,000 check on Thursday to cover the back fees and principal on her 2006 Suzuki Forenza.

    "I just want my car back," Kocab said. "Now I can have it back thanks to two wonderful people."

    Kocab said on Oct. 5, she and her daughter, Stephanie, woke up to find their car missing outside their Brandon apartment. At first, Kocab thought it had been stolen and called Williams who discovered it had been repossessed.

    "I called Hillsborough S.O., it turned out, unfortunately, she was two payments past due," Williams said. "They repo’d it at 3:25 in the morning. At that point, I knew I had to act fast because it’ll go to auction in two weeks."

    Kocab said she has been having a tough time since her son was shot and killed during a traffic stop in June of 2010.

    "We got behind with the car payment. Things have been on hold since Jeff passed away," she said. "I was a teacher and I quit teaching and so things have just been rough. And then I got sick with asthma.”

    To help Kocab out, Williams said he called Crofton, the owner of Uncle John's Pride Sausage, to see if he'd be willing to split the cost to get the car back.

    "When Dave told me about it... I was like, 'Sure I’d like to help. Anything I can do,'” Crofton said. "This was so dear to my heart, right around the corner from where my business is, and I just thought it really fit for what I like to do."

    Crofton said he's a philanthropist who normally likes to stay behind the scenes.

    "God does for me, what I like to do for people. So, it’s not really me, it’s what he’s done through me," he said. "I give all my credit to God.”

    Kocab said another reason she wanted that car back is because of the tribute to her son that's on the back window.

    "It’s got Jeff’s name on the back,” she said. “I just love these guys that have come through for us. It’s amazing.”

    It's one less worry for the fallen officer's mom who has to mentally prepare for Dontae Morris' double murder trial next month. Morris is the man accused of gunning down officers Jeff Kocab and David Curtis.

    "We know we have a car and it’s not going to be taken away and it’s ours," Kocab said. "I can get everything else under control.”

    "We’ve got your back,” said Williams.

    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Consider having your cat tested for Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  13. #508
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    Man returns lost photos to globe-trotting couple

    Vancouver man tracks down owners of SD card filled with world-tour photos








    On October 10, Vancouver photographer Thom Hamilton found an SD card containing 1,200 photos of an around-the-world trip on a sidewalk in Stanley Park. On October 19, he was finally able to track down the owners of the card: Maree and Jock Lindberg of Busseltown, Western Australia.

    He mailed the couple their SD card via FedEx this morning.


    The Australian couple were just a week away from completing their trip around the world when their camera was stolen.
    "They were devastated," Hamilton told the Province. "That was all their memories."

    To identify the card's owners, Hamilton combed through their photos and traced their journey, which started on July 22, to Norway, Denmark, Holland, France and Canada. Vancouver was their final destination before returning home.

    "As I started seeing images, I kind of saw a really big story developing in front of my eyes," he recalled. "It started painting a picture that it was a retirement couple who are on the trip of a lifetime, possibly."

    Hamilton posted some of their photos on his Facebook page and appealed to local media, but no one identified them.

    "I empathize with the people in the pictures," he explained his motivation for trying to help to the Province. "Being a photographer, I could image what it would feel like to lose an entire vacation of pictures. I hope that someone would put in some effort to find me."










    On closer inspection of the photos, Hamilton realized the couple was probably Australian. Their itinerary was a logical one if they started there, and a T-shirt in one of the photos promoted an annual charity event in Western Australia.

    Hamilton contacted Perth Now, the largest newspaper in Western Australia, which ran the story of the lost photos.

    "This was a trip literally around the world, so these memories need to find their way home," Hamilton told the newspaper.

    Readers recognized the couple.
    "Next thing I know is I had a friend request, someone was telling me they’re the cousin of the couple in the photos, and then the whole thing just took off," Hamilton told CTV British Columbia. "Within about half an hour I had an email from Maree, who was actually the owner of the card."

    "It's a little bit mind-blowing that there’s almost 7-billion people on the Earth, they could have been from anywhere, and within 10 days, by the start of a Facebook page, this all fell into place," he added.



    The Lindbergs had been travelling the world this summer, visiting apprentices who had lived and worked on their farm over the past 20 years.
    "So they were going from country to country to country to check in on some people they had taught throughout their life," Hamilton said.

    Maree Lindberg told Hamilton that their camera bag had been stolen in Vancouver.
    "I can still hardly believe it, I never imagined that I would see any of the photos again," Maree wrote in an email to Hamilton. "I also want to say a huge thank you to you for all the effort you’ve gone to to locate us."

    Hamilton is now considering a trip to Australia to meet the Lindbergs.
    "Instead of wondering when your next vacation is, maybe you should set up a life that you don't need to escape from." -- Seth Godin

  14. #509
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    Brandon Elementary students swap birthday presents for charity work

    LUFKIN, TX (KTRE) - It's not every day that a 10-year-old would decide to swap birthday presents for charity work, but that's exactly what five Brandon Elementary students did.

    The girls asked the community over the weekend to donate $1,000 to the American Cancer Society for their birthdays and the community listened.

    "We really didn't want presents this year because we just really like to help other people and there are some other people that go [to Brandon Elementary] that don't ever really get any of that kind of stuff," said Autumn Squires.

    Lauren Lear, Paige Rawlinson, Reagan McDuffie, Aubrey Lindsey and Autumn Squires decided a couple weeks ago that they wanted to host a birthday party to help raise money for several organizations they liked. They even asked guests to bring canned goods to donate to local food banks.

    "It feels good. Our goal is trying to do like people can copy like they can do the same thing that we did," Lauren Lear said.

    "Yeah, like, we're trying to get more people to not get presents and start doing donations to give to other people," Paige Rawlinson said.

    Sheila Skelton, the director of the HOST lab at Brandon Elementary, said she felt so inspired by what the girls were doing she even donated.

    "I think it shows leadership skills. I think—well, I know their families personally so I know how they've been brought up in their homes, and I know they've been taught that to give to others and to help other people and I think it just shows good leadership skills," Skelton said.

    The girls say they are unsure if they will donate each year, but would like to send donations to St. Jude's Children's Hospital.

    "Half of the kids in America or in the World or something go to St. Jude's to get surgery because they have some kind of cancer and we just don't want," Lauren Lear said.

    The American Cancer Society's Lufkin office says they think the girl's charitable work is great, and are very impressed with the girl's initiative to help aid cancer research.


    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Consider having your cat tested for Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

  15. #510
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    The Daily Treat: 'Subway Kittens' Find Fur-ever Home with Brooklyn Couple



    No need to do away with the hipster wardrobe, Arthur and August – the 'Subway Kittens' have permanently moved to Brooklyn.

    In August, the feline duo stopped service along New York City's B and Q lines for several hours when they somehow managed to find their way onto the subway tracks. Following their rescue, the pair was fostered by Steven Liu, a 25-year-old Bushwick, N.Y., resident, and his roommates to prepare them for adoption. "They're still really shy. I think they've been stray for a while," he told the Daily News at the time.

    Last week, roughly six weeks after their rescue, Animal Care & Control designated them ready to be brought home by a loving family – and Katherine and Keith Lubeley rose to the occasion. The married couple tell New York magazine they were immediately interested in bringing home the pair.

    "We had been thinking about adopting rescue cats for a while and specifically wanted two bonded kittens, so it wasn't out of the blue," said the couple. "Just perfect timing. And these two have a crazy special bond!"

    Keep up with your favorite celebs in the pages of PEOPLE Magazine by subscribing now.

    And with a few days under their belts in their new surroundings, Arthur and August seem to be adjusting well, as evidenced by the photos Katherine has shared on her Twitter feed.

    "They've found all the apartment's soft, sunny places and quiet nooks," said the couple. "They are having a rollicking good time getting to know their new kingdom."

    Ask your vet about microchipping. ~~ It could have saved Kuhio's life. And it cost Halo hers. Consider having your cat tested for Polycystic kidney disease ~~ Rest in peace Willy
    Loved by Lisa

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