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Thread: Cattle rustling in New England!

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  1. #1
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    Cattle rustling in New England!

    The more I read about this story (which is big in our news because it is close by), the more baffled I become.

    Last week, 49 cattle were stolen from a local farm,, in Dartmouth, Mass, which is near the RI border. They have an estimated value of $50,000. These are animals raised for beef. This is a community farmer, with 2 farmers owning the animals stolen. They raise the cattle as a side hobby to make a bit of extra money; and they are sold to and used by Muslims for their Eid Al-Adha, which is October 26th this year. Officials have located 39 of the cattle at an auction in Pennsylvania. The farmers went down to arrange for the return of the animals. Poor things, they were 'roughed up' from the travel,(I didn't put this in the Dog House so I won't go into detail on this part) which helped to identify them. The farmers had other means of identifying their cattle. No word on the other 10 as yet.

    I've never seen a cattle trailer, only horse trailers, which will haul 2 or 4 animals at a time. So if you have 4 cattle per trailer, you need 13 trailers -- with 13 trucks to haul them -- which means 13 drivers, right? So the cattle rustlers are a good sized gang of people.

    And now, the farmers involved had to arrange for . . . . 13 trailers? with 13 trucks and drivers? Astounding!

    I admit to not knowing a thing about farm life. The articles have no mention of the farmers having insurance to cover the transport cost.
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freedom View Post
    The more I read about this story (which is big in our news because it is close by), the more baffled I become.

    Last week, 49 cattle were stolen from a local farm,, in Dartmouth, Mass, which is near the RI border. They have an estimated value of $50,000. These are animals raised for beef. This is a community farmer, with 2 farmers owning the animals stolen. They raise the cattle as a side hobby to make a bit of extra money; and they are sold to and used by Muslims for their Eid Al-Adha, which is October 26th this year. Officials have located 39 of the cattle at an auction in Pennsylvania. The farmers went down to arrange for the return of the animals. Poor things, they were 'roughed up' from the travel,(I didn't put this in the Dog House so I won't go into detail on this part) which helped to identify them. The farmers had other means of identifying their cattle. No word on the other 10 as yet.

    I've never seen a cattle trailer, only horse trailers, which will haul 2 or 4 animals at a time. So if you have 4 cattle per trailer, you need 13 trailers -- with 13 trucks to haul them -- which means 13 drivers, right? So the cattle rustlers are a good sized gang of people.

    And now, the farmers involved had to arrange for . . . . 13 trailers? with 13 trucks and drivers? Astounding!

    I admit to not knowing a thing about farm life. The articles have no mention of the farmers having insurance to cover the transport cost.
    The cattle Rustlers could of loaded the cattle into a bull rack. A bull rack is a very large iron based trailer with dull wheels, the rack is made of very strong aluminum enforced with steel there are plenty of ventilation holes along the bull rack. It also has a roof on it with a lower & upper deck in it & can hold up to 37 head weighing in at 1,200 lbs. Don't know the weights on these cattle so maybe they could of loaded all of them into the bull rack if they were smaller lets say 800 lbs., a piece? There is also a portable chute you can pull out from under the back of the bull rack to load the cattle. The cattle would walk up the chute into the trailer. A large semi tractor would be attached to the bull rack to pull it.

    Farmers generally have insurance to cover their livestock. They would probably hire a bull rack driver to transport their cattle back to their farm. Hope this is helpful.
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  3. #3
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    Cattle trailers hold many

    I live near farms and see cows going by all the time. They pack them in. I don't know the exact number but it is many. They aren't cared for like horses! My guess is that you can get at least 15 or 20 in a trailer at a time.

  4. #4
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    Interesting info, and so sad. Thanks.
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  5. #5
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    I can't say that I've ever seen cattle transported around here, so I don't know how it's done. Delaware is "chicken country", and it makes me sad to see the way these creatures are treated on the way to be slaughtered. There are hundreds of crates stacked on what I would describe as flatbeds, with as many chickens as possible crammed into each crate. I often wonder how many make it thru alive and how many are DOA???
    Of course we see a lot of horse trailers too, and horses are treated very good. Most of them are race horses or work horses that are privately owned tho.

    If you ever watch Jane Valez-Mitchell on HLN weeknights, you would see some horrendous videos of the treatment of animals farmed for consumption. She is very much an animal rights activist and usually has a piece at the end of her show - supporting legislation for the humane treatment, etc, of all animals everywhere.
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  6. #6
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    Never heard of cattle rustling on that scale around here! It is surprising, too, with the falling price of beef in the Mid-West because of the drought, with farmers sending cattle to the slaughterhouse when they no longer can afford the feed for them. I am glad the folks were caught, and hopefully the others will be found. There's a very small profit margin for many farmers, and we would not want to see thieves destroying a small farmer's livelihood for the sake of a quick buck!
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karen View Post
    Never heard of cattle rustling on that scale around here! It is surprising, too, with the falling price of beef in the Mid-West because of the drought, with farmers sending cattle to the slaughterhouse when they no longer can afford the feed for them. I am glad the folks were caught, and hopefully the others will be found. There's a very small profit margin for many farmers, and we would not want to see thieves destroying a small farmer's livelihood for the sake of a quick buck!
    Karen, that's just it, they have NOT caught the thieves! They have some leads -- the auction house is not cooperating. Other folks have said that this Amish auction, if you show up with animals, they pay cash and take the animals to sell at a profit themselves. Yes, they have made it clear, this is an Amish auction, which is why they were working / holding the auction, on Labor Day. The Amish don't recognize the holiday.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karen View Post
    Never heard of cattle rustling on that scale around here! It is surprising, too, with the falling price of beef in the Mid-West because of the drought, with farmers sending cattle to the slaughterhouse when they no longer can afford the feed for them. I am glad the folks were caught, and hopefully the others will be found. There's a very small profit margin for many farmers, and we would not want to see thieves destroying a small farmer's livelihood for the sake of a quick buck!
    The beef prices are not falling they are going up. The average price for a 1200 pound steer or heifer is $1.26 per pound equaling $1,512.00 finished.

    The cow herds still exist & have been sold off to other buyers in other parts of the U.S.A or foreign countries. Don't know of a shortage as yet. When fall comes the number of weaned calves may not be a valuable as last Falls due to the lack of corn. There are other grains that can be fed to beef cattle to fatten them but it would probably take longer time to get the gains on them.

    All this can cause a rise in prices for the consumer & some brainstorming for the farmer as what would be the best decision sell them as calves get what you can for them & let someone else finish them out or finish them out yourself. This can make or break for a farmer.

    Most farmers had federal crop insurance which means they will be paid for their crop failure & the money will be used to buy fuel, seed, & fertilizer to plant again next year.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasvermont View Post
    I live near farms and see cows going by all the time. They pack them in. I don't know the exact number but it is many. They aren't cared for like horses! My guess is that you can get at least 15 or 20 in a trailer at a time.
    Your average goose neck heavy duty trailer which is pulled by a 3/4 ton pick up with duals will hold up to 10 head beef fat cattle (girls called heifers, boys called steers) lets say up to 1200 pounds each.

    Cows are female cattle which have been breed & have had calves. They can be beef or dairy breeds.

    A farmer that raises animals for consumption takes good care of them because they are his/her livelihood. A person can get injured or killed by farm animals if they are not careful around them.

    Yes, the animals can also be injured. That is where you call the veterinary to come & put them to sleep if nothing can be done for them or have someone shot them if you plan to consume the meat. We had a steer break a leg years ago & the veterinary could not do a thing for him so we planned to consume the meat instead of wasting it.

    Farming is not for the faint of heart & the products are there to feed a world of hungry people.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bonny View Post
    Your average goose neck heavy duty trailer which is pulled by a 3/4 ton pick up with duals will hold up to 10 head beef fat cattle (girls called heifers, boys called steers) lets say up to 1200 pounds

    A farmer that raises animals for consumption takes good care of them because they are his/her livelihood.

    Farming is not for the faint of heart & the products are there to feed a world of hungry people.
    Not to quibble with you, but neither of these statments are overly accurate. Abuse of farm animals is at the top of many humane lobbying groups agenda, and we could feed many, many more people with the grain we feed our livestock, then with the flesh of the livestock.

  11. #11
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    As a side note, the Amish are big into puppy mills - especially in Pennsylvania.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grace View Post
    As a side note, the Amish are big into puppy mills - especially in Pennsylvania.
    Which caused me to lose respect for them in a big way. I know it is not every Amish family, but still, I don't care who you are, puppy mills are intolerable.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cataholic View Post
    Not to quibble with you, but neither of these statments are overly accurate. Abuse of farm animals is at the top of many humane lobbying groups agenda, and we could feed many, many more people with the grain we feed our livestock, then with the flesh of the livestock.
    They are accurate & I live in a farming community on a farm & we raise cattle. Why would we abuse our animals? Enjoy your bowl of cereal people can not live on grain alone they need protein in their diet.

    The lobbying groups should spend more time & be more concerned about the conditions of humans.
    The frost is on the pumpkin & I've been BOO'D by two pet talk ghosts.
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  14. #14
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    I went on a field trip back in high school and we went on a trip to a LOCAL dairy farm. The cows were treated as royally as a cow can be treated, and you'd be able to tell otherwise. It was so clean to, I mean sure it still smelled but it was immaculate for a cow farm. The cows even had names.

    I think we all know abuse happens, but I think that is more on the factory farms then anything else. I don't think anyone is denying that fact but not all farm animals are treated terribly. Wouldn't make much sense to me, especially for a LOCAL smaller farmer to abuse his livelihood like that. There are bad apples, just like there are with pet owners.
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