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Thread: Manx

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
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    3

    Manx

    I'm the new mommy of a manx/siamese kitten. We've had him about two months now. Needless to say, he is absolutely adorable, very affectionate and intelligent. Quite a talker, too. We're also acquiring another manx kitten this weekend, a tiny kitten that someone threw away out in the country (how do people do that!?!). I have experience with the siamese breed, but know little about the Manx. Can anyone tell me about this breed and their characteristics? I've heard they're very intelligent, hop like rabbits (oh yes!), but am interested in anything else.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Pennsylvania
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    18,846
    Sorry, no info, Just a hearty welcome to pet talk. You'll like it here. But beware, it's addicting!!
    .

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Independence, Kansas
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    1,045
    Robyn S, welcome to pet talk. May I suggest that you type in "Manx Cat" into a search engine, and read all the information contained in those sites. The "Cat Fancier's Assn." always has good write-ups on all breeds of cats.

    ...........wayne

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    131
    Robyn,
    Congratulations!! You'll never regret having a Manx, in my opinion. Stump, my sweet 14-year old tuxedo Manx, has all the qualities you mentioned (he's adorable, affectionate, and intelligent). Yes, the Manx cats hop like rabbits because of their longer back legs. They are VERY companiable and sweet-tempered. Physically, they've been described as a series of connecting circles because of their many "rounded" features--big round eyes, round faces, and rounded bodies. They often have thick undercoats, as my Stump does, so make sure to brush regularly.

    As you can see, I can't say enough about this breed. By the way, Stump is the first cat I've ever had--and he single-handedly turned me into a cat person! Also, he came to live with me when he was 7 years old and an indoor-outdoor cat. At my house, he's strictly indoors, and he made the transition with no problem. He's in great health (the vet raves about him). When Stump was 10, I acquired a kitten (a tux, but not a Manx). Stump wasn't crazy about another cat in the house, but they've grown to tolerate each other. They're not best friends, but they'll often groom each other and play/wrestle.

    Stump loves weekends when I'm home from work. He'll check on me during the day just to see where I am and what I'm doing...and if I'm relaxing on the sofa, he'll jump up on my lap and take a nap...too bad if I had planned to get work done! He also is very intuitive and can tell when I don't feel well emotionally or physically.

    Congratulations, again--and THANK YOU for rescuing the new little one this weekend. You'll love them both!
    Cindy (aka Manxcat)
    household staff of Stump and Emmett

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Iowa
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    5,474
    I don't know anything about a manx. I do want to welcome you to Pet Talk.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio USA
    Posts
    11,421
    Welcome to PT...it is soo fun here. There are some rules you need to know about though...first, post lots and lots of pictures...second, talk about your cats all the time, third, educate the rest of us on your manx/meezer mix!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Posts
    2,685
    Here's some info on the Manx. I got it from www.cfainc.org

    I hope this helps!!!

    BREED PROFILE


    The Manx cat is believed to have originated hundreds of years ago on the Isle of Man, off the coast of England. Since many trade ships docked on the Isle, and all had ship cats, it is hard to tell just what the parent cat really was. Obviously, both longhair and shorthair were represented in the original mutation. Many longhairs were seen on the Isle along with the shorthairs.

    Records have been found on the Isle of Man that describe the cat as a mutation of the island’s domestic cats. It is believed that the island cats were involved, however, did some of the island cats come off the ships? We will never really know.

    CFA has recognized the Manx as a breed for many years. The oldest stud book on hand, Vol. #19, list Manx as one of the breeds that CFA recognized back in the 1920s.

    Since the Manx (or tailless) gene is dominant, kittens that inherit it can have a full tail, a short tail, a rise (known as a “rumpy riser”), or no tail (“rumpies”) at all. Breeders have found that it is possible to have all these tail lengths in one litter! Only the rumpy or the rumpy riser are eligible for competition in the championship category at CFA shows. All other tail lengths are eligible for the AOV (any other variety) Class. Many of today’s top breeding females are those that had a long tail when born. Numerous Grand Champions have come from a tailed cat, either male or female. The introduction of a tailed Manx into a breeding program provides a necessary sturdiness.



    Besides taillessness, the Manx is known for its robust and rounded appearance. This breed can actually be drawn with a series of circles! It has a very round head and rounded cheeks which give it a jowly appearance; even more so in the male cat than in the female. It is high in the hind quarters with the back legs much longer than the forelegs, thus causing the rump to be higher than the shoulders. The shortness of back forms a continuous arch from shoulders to rump. The eyes are rounded but set at a slight tilt toward the ear. The Manx should have a sweet expression.

    There are two types of Manx coats, shorthair and longhair (formerly Cymric). The coat length is the only difference between the longhair and shorthair Manx. The shorthair has a double coat, the outer guardhairs are somewhat hard, appearance is glossy. A softer coat may occur in whites and dilutes due to color texture gene link. The longhair has a silky texture to its coat. The coat will be of medium length, with breeches, abdomen and neck ruff being longer than the coat on the main body. The silky texture is soft, and falls smoothly on the body yet being full and plush due to the double coat.

    The Manx is a very playful cat as a rule. They can jump higher than anyone could imagine, and it is not unusual to find them perching on the highest point in any room. They have extremely powerful hind quarters. It has been stated by one Manx owner that “Manx are the feline sport cars of the car world with their acceleration and quick turns.” Manx exhibit many dog-like characteristics such as retrieving and burying their toys. They will either be known as a “one person cat” or the “family cat.” However, once they bond with someone, it is difficult for many Manx to be happy in a different home. On the other hand, there are those Manx that readily accept attention from any human source!



    Pricing on Manx usually depends on type, applicable markings and bloodlines distinguished by Grand Champion (GC), National or Regional winning parentage (NW or RW) or of Distinguished Merit parentage (DM). The DM title is achieved by the dam (mother) having produced five CFA grand champion/premier (alter) or DM offspring, or sire (father) having produced fifteen CFA grand champion/premier or DM offspring. Usually breeders make available kittens between twelve and sixteen weeks of age. After twelve weeks, kittens have had their basic inoculations and developed the physical and social stability needed for a new environment, showing, or being transported by air. Keeping such a rare treasure indoors, neutering or spaying and providing acceptable surfaces (e.g. scratching posts) for the natural behavior of scratching (CFA disapproves of declawing or tendonectomy surgery) are essential elements for maintaining a healthy, long and joyful life.

    There are CFA clubs devoted to the promotion, protection and preservation of the Manx breed. For more information, please send inquiries to CFA, PO Box 1005, Manasquan NJ 08736-0805.

    BREED STANDARD


    GENERAL: the overall impression of the Manx cat is that of roundness; round head with firm, round muzzle and prominent cheeks; broad chest; substantial short front legs; short back which arches from shoulders to a round rump; great depth of flank and rounded, muscular thighs. The Manx should be alert, clear of eye, with a glistening, clean, well-groomed coat. They should be surprisingly heavy when lifted. Manx may be slow to mature and allowance should be made in young cats.

    HEAD & EARS: round head with prominent cheeks and a jowly appearance (more evident in adult males) that enhances the round appearance of the breed. In profile, head is medium in length with a gentle dip from forehead to nose. Well developed muzzle, very slightly longer than it is broad, with a strong chin. Definite whisker break with large, round whisker pads. Short, thick neck. Ears wide at the base, tapering gradually to a rounded tip. Medium in size in proportion to the head, widely spaced and set slightly outward. When viewed from behind, the ear set resembles the rocker on a cradle. The furnishings of the ears are sparse in Shorthair Manx and full furnishings for Longhair Manx.

    EYES: large, round and full. Set at a slight angle toward the nose (outer corners slightly higher than inner corners). Ideal eye color conforms to requirements of coat color.

    BODY: solidly muscled, compact and well-balanced, medium in size with sturdy bone structure. The Manx is stout in appearance with broad chest and well-sprung ribs. The constant repetition of curves and circles give the Manx the appearance of great substance and durability, a cat that is powerful without the slightest hint of coarseness. Males may be slightly larger than females.

    Flank (fleshy area of the side between the ribs and hip) has greater depth than in other breeds, causing considerable depth to the body when viewed from the side.

    The short back forms a smooth, continuous arch from shoulders to rump, curving at the rump to form the desirable round look. Length of back is in proportion to the entire cat, height of hindquarters equal to length of body. Males may be somewhat longer. Because the Longhair Manx has longer coat over the rump area and breeches, the body may appear longer.

    TAILLESSNESS: appearing to be absolute in the perfect specimen. A rise of bone at the end of the spine is allowed and should not be penalized unless it is such that it stops the judgeOs hand, thereby spoiling the tailless appearance of the cat. The rump is extremely broad and round.

    LEGS & FEET: heavily boned, forelegs short and set well apart to emphasize the broad, deep chest. Hind legs much longer than forelegs, with heavy, muscular thighs and substantial lower legs. Longer hind legs cause the rump to be considerably higher than the shoulders. Hind legs are straight when viewed from behind. Paws are neat and round with five toes in front and four behind.

    COAT LENGTH - Shorthair: double coat is short and dense with a well-padded quality due to the longer, open outer coat and the close cottony undercoat. Coat may be thinner during the summer months.

    COAT TEXTURE - Shorthair: texture of outer guard hairs is somewhat hard, appearance is glossy. A softer coat may occur in whites and dilutes due to color/texture gene link but should not be confused with the silky texture found in the Longhair Manx.

    COAT LENGTH - Longhair: the double coat is of medium length, dense and well padded over the main body, gradually lengthening from the shoulders to the rump. Breeches, abdomen and neck-ruff is usually longer than the coat on the main body. Cheek coat is thick and full. The collar like neck-ruff extends from the shoulders, being bib-like around the chest. Breeches should be full and thick to the hocks in the mature cat. Lower leg and head coat (except for cheeks) should be shorter than on the main body and neck-ruff, but dense and full in appearance. Toe tufts and ear tufts are desirable. All things being equal in type, preference should be given to the cat showing full coating.

    COAT TEXTURE - Longhair: coat is soft and silky, falling smoothly on the body yet being full and plush due to the double coat. Coat should have a healthy glossy appearance. Allowance to be made for seasonal and age variations.

    TRANSFER TO AOV: definite, visible tail joint.

    PENALIZE: on the Longhair Manx, coat that lacks density, has a cottony texture or is of one overall length.

    DISQUALIFY: evidence of poor physical condition; incorrect number of toes; evidence of hybridization; evidence of weakness in the hindquarters; pronounced stop or nose break.


    MANX COLORS
    WHITE: pure glistening white. Nose leather and paw pads: pink. Eye color: deep blue or brilliant copper. Odd-eyed whites shall have one blue and one copper eye with equal color depth.
    BLACK: dense coal black, sound from roots to tip of fur. Free from any tinge of rust on tips. Nose leather: black. Paw pads: black or brown. Eye color: brilliant copper.

    BLUE: blue, lighter shade preferred, one level tone. Sound to the roots. A sound darker shade is more acceptable than an unsound lighter shade. Nose leather and paw pads: blue. Eye color: brilliant copper.

    RED: deep, rich, clear, brilliant red; without shading, markings, or ticking. Lips and chin the same color as coat. Nose leather and paw pads: brick red. Eye color: brilliant copper.

    CREAM: one level shade of buff cream without markings. Sound to the roots. Lighter shades preferred. Nose leather and paw pads: pink. Eye color: brilliant copper.

    CHINCHILLA SILVER: undercoat pure white. Coat on back, flanks, and head sufficiently tipped with black to give the characteristic sparkling silver appearance. Legs may be slightly shaded with tipping. Chin, stomach, and chest, pure white. Rims of eyes, lips, and nose outlined with black. Nose leather: brick red. Paw pads: black. Eye color: green or blue-green.

    SHADED SILVER: undercoat white with a mantle of black tipping shading down from sides and face from dark on the ridge to white on the chin, chest, and stomach. Legs to be of the same tone as the face. The general effect to be much darker than a chinchilla. Rims of eyes, lips, and nose outlined with black. Nose leather: brick red. Paw pads: black. Eye color: green or blue-green.

    BLACK SMOKE: white undercoat, deeply tipped with black. Cat in repose appears black. In motion the white undercoat is clearly apparent. Points and mask black with narrow band of white at base of hairs next to skin which may be seen only when fur is parted. Nose leather and paw pads: black. Eye color: brilliant copper.

    BLUE SMOKE: white undercoat, deeply tipped with blue. Cat in repose appears blue. In motion the white undercoat is clearly apparent. Points and mask blue with narrow band of white at base of hairs next to skin which may be seen only when fur is parted. Nose leather and paw pads: blue. Eye color: brilliant copper.

    CLASSIC TABBY PATTERN: markings dense, clearly defined, and broad. Legs evenly barred with bracelets coming up to meet the body markings. Several unbroken necklaces on neck and upper chest, the more the better. Frown marks on forehead form an intricate letter "M". Unbroken line runs back from outer corner of eye. Swirls on cheeks. Vertical lines over back of head extend to shoulder markings which are in the shape of a butterfly with both upper and lower wings distinctly outlined and marked with dots inside outline. Back markings consist of a vertical line from butterfly down the entire spine with a vertical stripe paralleling it on each side, the three stripes well separated by stripes of the ground color. Large solid blotch on each side to be encircled by one or more unbroken rings. Side markings should be the same on both sides. Double vertical rows of buttons on chest and stomach.

    MACKEREL TABBY PATTERN: markings dense, clearly defined, and all narrow pencillings. Legs evenly barred with narrow bracelets coming up to meet the body markings. Necklaces on neck and chest distinct, like so many chains. Head barred with an "M" on the forehead. Unbroken lines running back from the eyes. Lines running down the head to meet the shoulders. Spine lines run together to form a narrow saddle. Narrow pencillings run around body.

    PATCHED TABBY PATTERN: a patched tabby (torbie) is an established silver, brown, or blue tabby with patches of red and/or cream.

    BROWN PATCHED TABBY: ground color brilliant coppery brown with classic or mackerel tabby markings of dense black with patches of red and/or cream clearly defined on both body and extremities. A blaze of red and/or cream on the face is desirable. Lips and chin the same shade as the rings around the eyes. Eye color: brilliant copper.

    BLUE PATCHED TABBY: ground color, including lips and chin, pale bluish ivory with classic or mackerel tabby markings of very deep blue affording a good contrast with ground color. Patches of cream clearly defined on both body and extremities. A blaze of cream on the face is desirable. Warm fawn overtones or patina over the whole. Eye color: brilliant copper.

    SILVER PATCHED TABBY: ground color, including lips and chin, pale silver with classic or mackerel tabby markings of dense black with patches of red and/or cream clearly defined on both body and extremities. A blaze of red and/or cream on the face is desirable. Eye color: brilliant copper or hazel.

    SILVER TABBY (classic, mackerel): ground color, including lips and chin, pale clear silver. Markings dense black. Nose leather: brick red. Paw pads: black. Eye color: green or hazel.

    RED TABBY (classic, mackerel): ground color red. Markings deep, rich red. Lips and chin red. Nose leather and paw pads: brick red. Eye color: brilliant copper.

    BROWN TABBY (classic, mackerel): ground color brilliant coppery brown. Markings dense black. Lips and chin the same shade as the rims around the eyes. Back of leg black from paw to heel. Nose leather: brick red. Paw pads: black or brown. Eye color: brilliant copper.

    BLUE TABBY (classic, mackerel): ground color, including lips and chin, pale bluish ivory. Markings a very deep blue affording a good contrast with ground color. Warm fawn overtones or patina over the whole. Nose leather: old rose. Paw pads: rose. Eye color: brilliant copper.

    CREAM TABBY (classic, mackerel): ground color, including lips and chin, very pale cream. Markings buff or cream sufficiently darker than the ground color to afford good contrast but remaining within the dilute color range. Nose leather and paw pads: pink. Eye color: brilliant copper.

    TORTOISESHELL: black brindled with red and/or shades of red. Brindling with minimal patching acceptable. . Eye color: brilliant copper.

    CALICO: white with unbrindled patches of black and red. White predominant on underparts. Eye color: brilliant copper, odd-eyed, or blue-eyed.

    DILUTE CALICO: white with unbrindled patches of blue and cream. White predominant on underparts. Eye color: brilliant copper, odd-eyed, or blue-eyed.

    BLUE-CREAM: blue brindled with cream. Brindling with minimal patching acceptable. Eye color: brilliant copper.

    BI-COLOR: white with unbrindled patches of solid color – black, blue, red or cream; white with mackerel or classic tabby patterns – brown, blue, red, or cream; white with either classic or mackerel brown patched or blue patched tabbies. Includes all expressions of the white spotting gene from low-white to van patterns. All other recognized Manx colors with white to be shown in OMC class. Cats with no more than a locket and/or button do not qualify for this color class. Such cats shall be judged in the color class of their basic color with no penalty for such locket and/or button. Eye color: brilliant copper, odd-eyed, or blue-eyed.

    OMC (Other Manx Colors): any other color or pattern with the exception of those showing hybridization resulting in the colors chocolate, lavender, the Himalayan pattern, or these combinations with white. Eye color: brilliant copper, odd-eyed, or blue-eyed.


    BREED ARTICLE


    THE MANX CAT
    by Marion Hall
    The Manx has existed as a breed for a very long time. According to Dr. D.W. Kerruish, DVM (Manxland Cattery) in his book The Manx Cat (which was revised in 1965), the breed was known on the Isle of Man two to three hundred years ago. Manx have been recognized by CFA as a breed for many years. My collection of Stud Books goes back to No. 19 in which there are several Manx registered in the late 1920s and early '30s. Since many of them were registered at that time as "details unknown," it is not possible to determine how many of these cats might have had long hair. It is known that many Manx on the Isle of Man were long coated.

    Dr. Kerruish is of the opinion that the Manx mutated from the British Shorthair. My personal opinion is that it is impossible to know for certain just when they mutated into a tailless cat. It is very likely that the mutation did occur on the Isle of Man but since many ships docked there, we may never know what was behind the first tailless cat. I am sure that the British Shorthair was involved! Many Isle of Man cats were imported to the US and as there were longhairs in the gene pool on the Isle of Man, it is probable that both coat lengths were behind many of the imports.

    Dr. Kerruish did much research on the history of the Manx cat. In his book he states that the earliest reference to the Manx he could find is to cats owned by the famous painter Joseph Turner. He found this reference in the book, Turner's Golden Visions, by C. Lewis Hyde. In 1810, when the painter was 35, he claimed that he had seven cats that came from the Isle of Man.

    Jeanie McPhee was kind enough to send me a copy of the article on Manx, written by Frances Simpson, which was published in 1902. This article is quite interesting since it states that at the turn of the century, Manx were shown in Europe with varying degrees of tails. It seems that "stubbies" could compete at that time for championship, and some of them were of top type. Ms. Simpson made remarks regarding the type she expected to see on the Manx when judging. The cats depicted in her article could well be Manx of today, and some of the Manx pictured in Dr. Kerruish's book could also compete with today's Manx. The type we see today in the Manx was apparently seen as far back as the 1800s. Therefore, it is possible that the Manx could be one of the least changed in type of any of the breeds recognized by CFA today.

    Both Ms. Simpson and Dr. Kerruish mention in their writings the stump-tailed cats found in Borneo, Japan, and Malaya which are the cats we know today as Japanese Bobtails. It appears that this breed has also been around a long time! Dr. T. Tansanguan of the Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangkok, Thailand, confirms that the Japanese Bobtail is a separate strain of cat.

    Sisters Ellen and Ruth Carlson, who resided in the Chicago area, were very active in Manx as far back as the 1930s. At that time they showed in ACA as well as CFA and had the first Manx Grand Champion in ACA. In 1935 they imported a cat called "Ginger of Manx of Glen Orry." Ginger came to them from Denmark but had been born on the Isle of Man, and he was behind nearly all of the cats the Carlsons bred.

    Another early breeder was Price Cross of the Dallas, Texas area. He had the Mao O'Man cattery and developed several well-known cats of that time. The one I remember seeing on pedigrees most often was Mao Patricia O'Man.

    As far as I can trace, the first Grand Champion in CFA was Mrs. Kelly of An-Si who was shown in the 1950s. A black import from the Isle of Man owned by Mrs. Ann Bienemann of the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area, Mrs. Kelly granded in 1958.

    One of the foundation queens of Tra-Mar, GC Xantha's Candice of Tra-Mar. "Candy" was highest scoring Shorthair All American in 1960. (In those early days, CFA did not have national scoring as we now know it; a magazine scored all cat shows.) Candy was the second Manx Grand Champion in CFA, earning her title in 1959. Her son, GC Tra-Mar Sunny, was twice Highest Scoring All American Midwest Cat. Another cat is Manxland Maisie. Bred and owned by Dr. Kerruish, Maisie was the dam of Manxland Mornin' Mist of Tra-Mar, a copper-eyed white who sired Sunny. These three cats are the foundation of Tra-Mar and are behind today's Tra-Mar cats, as well as many other lines.

    Currently there are two Manx male Distinguished Merit cats: GC Sinleo White Irish of Shelleo, DM, a copper-eyed white, who was 13th Best Cat in the 1980-81 season; and CH Tahame's Shamen, DM (CFA's first Manx male DM), who was bred and owned by Sherman and Sandy Ross. There are several Manx female DMs.

    GC Sinleo White Irish sired a son, GC Briar Brae Merphy, a red tabby who was 6th Best Cat in Championship in 1985-86. Irish's daughter, GC, GP NW Tra-Mar Limited Edition, a brown patched tabby, was 3rd Best Cat in Premiership in 1992-93. Irish is still alive, going on 17 and has never been sick a day in his life. He still bats his ping pong ball around and certainly never misses a meal!

    Other cats are GC Kelsha Lacy, DM, an early brown tabby bred and owned by Kelly Tanner, and GC, GP, NW Clacritter Claudell, DM, a dilute calico bred and owned by Leslie Falteisek who was 8th Best Cat in 1983-84. Another winner for Leslie was GC, NW Clacritter Kadja, a cream tabby and white male who was CFA's 7th Best Cat in 1986-87. Best Manx (Shorthair) in 1991-92 was GC Cottori Bubba, a copper-eyed white male bred and owned by Paul and Becky Cotter. Paul and Becky had visited the Isle of Man during a military tour, but they did not purchase a Manx until they were back in the US. Their very first Manx was an Isle of Man import, a black female called Victoria who now is a very happy, fat spay.


    Cymric (Longhair Manx)
    It was the 1989-90 show season before the longhair Manx were recognized, and at that time they were called Cymric. The very first Cymric to be Best of Breed was GC Kabelkim Orange Julius, a red tabby bred by Elma Sterk; 2nd Best that year was GC Clacritter Callyn, a red tabby bred by Leslie Falteisek. Even before the longhairs were recognized for championship other breeders were either working with them or including them in their breeding programs. Kelly Tanner, of Kelsha Manx, produced many of the early longhairs and Linda Morris Osborn has worked with them since long before they were accepted. Her very first longhair was Sinleo's Tuffy Mouse of Arrow. Bred by Cynthia Engstrom and owned by Linda, he is behind many of her longhair Manx. GC Tellnotails Butterfly, a calico van female bred and owned by Marlene and Ron Kelman, was Best Cymric in 1992-93. A black and white male, GC Blarney's Paddy O'Furrnutsure, is another outstanding longhair Manx bred and owned by Dick and Renee Cullen. Best Manx Longhair for 1994-95 was GC Tirion Fionan of Nufurs, a brown mackerel tabby and white male bred by Sandra Willen and owned by Susan Nuffer, Sandra Willen, and Mary Davin. Fionan was also Best Cymric in the 1993-94 show season.
    In February 1994 the Manx Breed Council and the Cymric Breed Council asked for Longhair Manx status for the Cymrics. This was granted by the CFA Board of Directors and became effective in May 1994. We now have a Longhair and a Shorthair division of the Manx. This has meant that it is now acceptable to intermix the Longhair and the Shorthair for breeding, and the kittens are registered as either Longhair or Shorthair, whichever is produced from a breeding. Until this time, if a Shorthair was produced in a Longhair litter, it could not be shown, no matter how typy it was.

    The Manx is a short, round cat; but unfortunately, this cat CAN be too short. The genetic mutation peculiar to the Manx cat determines the length of the spinal column. A super short spine can fail to provide proper nerve and muscle endings which can result in an open spine, a lack of bowel and/or bladder control, weak hindquarters or one weak hind leg. And yet there are super short cats that are strong and healthy. Once a Manx kitten gets past the age of six months the majority of well-cared-for pets live long lives - 15 or more years is not an uncommon lifespan. Normally Manx are extremely hearty cats and are not prone to upper respiratory problems.

    Manx are very playful cats as a rule. They can jump higher than anyone would imagine, and it is not uncommon to find them perching on the highest point in any room. They have extremely powerful hindquarters. One Manx owner states that Manx are the feline sports cars of the cat world with their acceleration and quick turns. They have many doglike characteristics, and will retrieve, bury their toys, etc. Manx can often be either one-person or one-family cats and once they bond with someone, it is difficult for many of them to be happy in a different home. On the other hand, there are also those Manx that readily accept attention from any human source.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3

    My Manx Babies

    Thanks to all for the wonderful info about the Manx breed. Ive been doing some research on the web and found out lots about the breed and am so excited about becoming a mommy to these little babies. Let me tell you a little about them.

    My manx/meezer mix, Frankie, is a stumpy with classic Siamese markings. He was born July 1, so he's about 4 months old now. He looks to be more of a blue point than a seal point, and his eyes are pale blue, so he gives off this smokey appearance which is quite alluring. His tail is the cutest in that he wags it all the time. When he gets excited it puffs up and looks like a little porkchop! He doesn't have the typical roundness of a Manx, he is more sleek like the Siamese. And, he indeed hops like a bunny and is a speed demon that can turn on a dime (squirrels, look out!).

    The newest edition is a female who we think is about 6 weeks old. She is in quarantine right now with coccidia, but is making tremendous progress and should be ready to come home in a few days. We are so excited about getting her that we drove 2-1/2 hours this weekend to visit her at her foster mom's home. As I mentioned earlier, she showed up in a shed way out in the country along with her littermates when they were only four weeks old. Unfortunately, her brothers and sisters scattered when they were discovered and haven't been seen since. She was the only one that stayed in the shed and was very shy for the first couple of days. Her foster mom started feeding her eventually convinced her that she was okay. As it turned out, she is very loving and affectionate so we know that she isn't feral. We've decided to name her Phonenix, in honor of her new beginning. It is also a new beginning for us in that we've lost two of our beloved cats to illness in the last two months (we have six!!). Phoenix has the classic manx body shape--round, round, round. She is a rumpy with out any bone at all. I've attached a pix of her so you can see how beautiful she is (sorry don't have a digital pix of Frankie). Needless to say, we are crazy about her and can't wait to pick her up this weekend.

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