Page 70 of 124 FirstFirst ... 20606162636465666768697071727374757677787980120 ... LastLast
Results 1,036 to 1,050 of 1857

Thread: In Memoriam

  1. #1036
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,563
    World War II


    Soldier Missing in Action from WWII Identified

    The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

    Army Staff Sgt. John R. Simonetti, 26, of Jackson Heights, N.Y., will be buried on Oct. 25 in Arlington National Cemetery. Following the Normandy invasion, allied troops began the deadly task of engaging regrouped German forces in the pastures, hedgerows and villages of France. On June 16, 1944, Simonetti was among the advancing infantrymen of the 9th Infantry Regiment of the 2nd Infantry Division. The soldiers were met with heavy automatic weapons and mortar fire and were forced to stop and take cover before they reached the French town of St. Germain-d’Elle. During the battle, the Americans sustained heavy losses, including Simonetti. Two members of his unit later gave conflicting information on the location and disposition of his remains. In the first account, the witness stated his body could not be recovered due to enemy activity, and the second said his body was evacuated to the battalion aid station. Two post-war investigations failed to recover his remains and he was declared non-recoverable by a military review board in 1950.

    In May 2009, a French construction crew uncovered human remains and military equipment—including Simonetti’s identifications tags—when excavating a site in St. Germain-d’Elle. French police turned over the remains and artifacts to U.S. officials for analysis.

    Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command used dental comparisons in the identification of his remains.

    At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans. Today, more than 74,000 are unaccounted-for from the conflict.

  2. #1037
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,563
    20 October 2010


    The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

    Spc. Gerald R. Jenkins, 19, of Circleville, Ohio, died Oct. 20 in Maquan, Zhari district, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to the 1st Brigade Special Troop Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, Fort Campbell, Ky.

  3. #1038
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,563
    21 October 2010

    The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

    Staff Sgt. Kenneth K. McAninch, 28, of Logansport, Ind., died Oct. 21 at Yahya Khel district, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using small arms fire. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Ky.

  4. #1039
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,563
    From the NY Times -

    October 22, 2010
    The Way We Treat Our Troops
    By BOB HERBERT

    You can only hope that the very preliminary peace efforts in Afghanistan bear fruit before long. But for evidence that the United States is letting its claim to greatness, and even common decency, slip through its fingers, all you need to do is look at the way we treat our own troops.

    The idea that the United States is at war and hardly any of its citizens are paying attention to the terrible burden being shouldered by its men and women in uniform is beyond appalling.

    We can get fired up about Lady Gaga and the Tea Party crackpots. We’re into fantasy football, the baseball playoffs and our obsessively narcissistic tweets. But American soldiers fighting and dying in a foreign land? That is such a yawn.

    I would bring back the draft in a heartbeat. Then you wouldn’t have these wars that last a lifetime. And you wouldn’t get mind-bending tragedies like the death of Sgt. First Class Lance Vogeler, a 29-year-old who was killed a few weeks ago while serving in the Army in his 12th combat tour. That’s right, his 12th — four in Iraq and eight in Afghanistan.

    Twelve tours may be unusual, but multiple tours — three, four, five — are absolutely normal. We don’t have enough volunteers to fight these endless wars. Americans are big on bumper stickers, and they like to go to sports events and demonstrate their patriotism by chanting, “U-S-A! U-S-A!” But actually putting on a uniform and going into harm’s way? No thanks.

    Sergeant Vogeler was married and the father of two children, and his wife was expecting their third.

    It’s a quaint notion, but true: with wars come responsibilities. The meat grinder of war takes its toll in so many ways, and we should be paying close attention to all aspects of it. Instead, we send our service members off to war, and once they’re gone, it’s out of sight, out of mind.

    If we were interested, we might notice that record numbers of soldiers are killing themselves. At least 125 committed suicide through August of this year, an awful pace that if continued would surpass last year’s all-time high of 162.

    Stressed-out, depressed and despondent soldiers are seeking help for their mental difficulties at a rate that is overwhelming the capacity of available professionals. And you can bet that there are even higher numbers of troubled service members who are not seeking help.

    In the war zones, we medicate the troubled troops and send them right back into action, loading them up with antidepressants, sleeping pills, anti-anxiety drugs and lord knows what other kinds of medication.

    One of the things we have long known about warfare is that the trouble follows the troops home. The Times published an article this week by Aaron Glantz, a reporter with The Bay Citizen news organization in San Francisco, that focused on the extraordinary surge of fatalities among Afghanistan and Iraq veterans. These young people died, wrote Mr. Glantz, “not just as a result of suicide, but also of vehicle accidents, motorcycle crashes, drug overdoses or other causes after being discharged from the military.”

    An analysis of official death certificates showed that, from 2005 through 2008, more than 1,000 California veterans under the age of 35 had died. That’s three times the number of service members from California who were killed in Afghanistan and Iraq during the same period.

    Veterans of the two wars were two-and-a-half times as likely to commit suicide as people the same age with no military service. “They were twice as likely,” Mr. Glantz reported, “to die in a vehicle accident, and five-and-a-half times as likely to die in a motorcycle accident.”

    The torment that wars put people through is not something that can be turned on and off like a switch. It’s a potentially deadly burden that demands attention and care. People shouldn’t be exposed to it if there is any possible alternative.

    The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have been world-class fiascos. To continue them without taking serious account of the horrors being endured by our troops and their families is just wrong.

    The war in Afghanistan, the longest in our history, began on Oct. 7, 2001. It’s now in its 10th year. After all this time and all the blood shed and lives lost, it’s still not clear what we’re doing. Osama bin Laden hasn’t been found. The Afghan Army can’t stand on its own. Our ally in Pakistan can’t be trusted, and our man in Kabul is, at best, flaky. A good and humane society would not keep sending its young people into that caldron.

    Shakespeare tells us to “be not afraid of greatness.” At the moment, we are acting like we’re terrified.

    Source

  5. #1040
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,563
    Denmark


    Danish soldier, Mikkel Jørgensen, age 21, was killed on October 23, 2010, in a firefight in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

    He was attached to Charlie Company, from the Royal Guard in Hovelte. He had been in Afghanistan since August.

    Mikkel Jørgensen was shot as he was on a patrol in the area east of Patrol Base Bridzar. Comrades and sanitation soldiers provided first aid on the spot before he was evacuated by helicopter to the field hospital at Camp Bastion.

    He leaves behind his father, mother and younger brother.


  6. #1041
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,563
    23 October 2010


    The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

    Spc. Ronnie J. Pallares, 19, of Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., died Oct. 23 in Andar district, Ghazni, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to the 27th Engineer Battalion, Fort Bragg, N.C.

  7. #1042
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,563
    24 October 2010

    The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

    Spc. Steven L. Dupont, 20, of Lafayette, La., died Oct. 24 at Rangrizan, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to the 3rd Squadron, 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment, Vilseck, Germany.

  8. #1043
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,563
    24 October 2010

    The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

    Sgt. 1st Class Charles M. Sadell, 34, of Columbia, Mo., died Oct. 24 at National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Md., of wounds suffered Oct. 5 at Arif Kala, Afghanistan, when insurgents attacked his unit using an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to the 1st Squadron, 71st Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum, N.Y.

  9. #1044
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,563
    22 October 2010

    The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

    Staff Sgt. Aracely Gonzalez O’Malley, 31, of Brawley, Calif., died Oct. 22 at Homburg, Germany, of injuries sustained in a non combat incident Oct. 12 at Mazar-e Sharif, Afghanistan. She was assigned to the 307th Integrated Theater Signal Battalion, 516th Signal Brigade, 311th Signal Command, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii.

  10. #1045
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,563
    24 October 2010

    The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

    Spc. Thomas A. Moffitt, 21, of Wichita, Kan., died Oct. 24 at Sarobi District, Paktika Province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when his unit was attacked by insurgents with small arms fire and rocket propelled grenades. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 506th Infantry, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Ky.

  11. #1046
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    indianapolis,indiana usa
    Posts
    22,850
    Grace, your post # 1038 contained a notice of one Indiana man killed in
    Afganistan. I noticed a story about him in the local paper. I was shocked
    to earn he had had left behind five children,besides his wife and his parents.

    I didn't think someone with that many dependants would be allowed
    to serve. Such a great loss for his children. I know during the
    Draft, that wouldn't be allowed, would it?


    http://www.indystar.com/article/2010...t|IndyStar.com
    I've Been Boo'd

    I've been Frosted






    Today is the oldest you've ever been, and the youngest you'll ever be again.

    Eleanor Roosevelt

  12. #1047
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,563
    liz - they are so desperate for bodies, they will take anyone who can walk and breathe at the same time. I've heard about brothers serving at the same time - maybe not in the same unit, but in the same country.

    You know, the only ones who are disqualified are gay. Hopefully that won't last much longer.

  13. #1048
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,563
    24 October 2010

    The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation New Dawn.

    Pfc. David R. Jones Jr., 21, of Saint Johnsville, N.Y., died Oct. 24 at Baghdad, Iraq, of injuries sustained in a non-combat incident. He was assigned to the 2nd Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, Fort Hood, Texas.

  14. #1049
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,563
    World War II

    Airmen Missing in Action from WWII Identified

    The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of two U.S. servicemen, missing in action from World War II, have been identified and are being returned to their families for burial with full military honors.

    Army Air Forces Staff Sgts. Claude A. Ray, 24, Coffeyville, Kan., and Claude G. Tyler, 24, Landover, Md., will both be buried today -- Ray in Fallbrook, Calif., and Tyler in Arlington National Cemetery. These two airmen, along with 10 other crew members, were ordered to carry out a reconnaissance mission in their B-24D Liberator, taking off from an airfield near Port Moresby, New Guinea, on Oct. 27, 1943. Allied plans were being formulated to mount an attack on the Japanese redoubt at Rabaul, New Britain. American strategists considered it critical to take Rabaul in order to support the eventual invasion of the Philippines. The crew’s assigned area of reconnaissance was the nearby shipping lanes in the Bismarck Sea. But during their mission, they were radioed to land at a friendly air strip nearby due to poor weather conditions. The last radio transmission from the crew did not indicate their location, and searchers that day and the following weeks were unable to locate the aircraft in spite of multiple searches over land and sea areas.

    Following World War II, the Army Graves Registration Service conducted investigations and searches for 43 missing airmen, including Ray and Tyler, in the area but concluded in June 1949 that they were unrecoverable.

    In August 2003 a team from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) received information on a crash site from a citizen in Papua New Guinea while they were investigating another case. He also turned over an identification card from one of the crew members and reported that there were possible human remains at the site of the crash. Twice in 2004 other JPAC teams attempted to visit the site but were unable to do so due to poor weather and hazardous conditions at the helicopter landing site. Another team was able to successfully excavate the site from January to March 2007 where they found several identification tags from the B-24D crew as well as human remains.

    Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA -- which matched that of relatives of Ray and Tyler -- in the identification of their remains

    Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died. At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover and identify approximately 79,000 Americans. Today, more than 74,000 are unaccounted-for from the conflict.

  15. #1050
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,563
    26 October 2010


    The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

    Sgt. 1st Class Phillip C. Tanner, 43, of Sheridan, Wyo., died Oct. 26 at Ali Al Salem, Kuwait, of injuries sustained in a non-combat incident. He was assigned to the 106th Transportation Battalion, 101st Sustainment Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Ky.

Similar Threads

  1. In memoriam bun-bun Billie
    By Maya & Inka's mommy in forum Pet Memorial
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 07-02-2007, 07:15 PM
  2. In memoriam - sweet Rose
    By sisterdog in forum Dog Memorial
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-02-2007, 10:50 PM
  3. In Memoriam Ann Richards
    By lizbud in forum Dog House
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-29-2006, 02:08 PM
  4. Annika-In Memoriam
    By smokey the elder in forum Today's Cat
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-18-2004, 03:03 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Copyright © 2001-2013 Pet of the Day.com