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Thread: In Memoriam

  1. #661
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    10 June 2010


    The Department of Defense announced today the death of a Marine who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

    Lance Cpl. Gavin R. Brummund, 22, of Arnold, Calif., died June 10 while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan. He was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

  2. #662
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    December 7, 1941


    WWII Pearl Harbor Sailor Identified

    The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman missing in action from World War II has been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

    He is U.S. Navy Fireman Third Class Gerald G. Lehman, of Hancock, Mich. He will be buried Saturday in Hancock.

    When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941, the battleship USS Oklahoma suffered multiple torpedo hits and capsized. As a result, 429 sailors and Marines died. Following the attack, 36 of these servicemen were identified and the remaining 393 were buried as unknowns in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, Hawaii.

    In 2003, an independent researcher contacted the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) with information he believed indicated that one of the USS Oklahoma casualties who was buried as an unknown could be positively identified. After reviewing the case, JPAC exhumed the casket and discovered that it contained Lehman’s remains.

    Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory also used dental comparisons and mitochondrial DNA – which matched that of his sister and nieces -- in the identification of Lehman’s remains.

    More than 400,000 of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II died. At the end of the war, the U.S. government was unable to recover, identify and bury approximately 79,000 as known persons. They include those buried with honor as unknowns, those lost at sea, and those missing in action. That number also includes the 1,100 sailors entombed in the USS Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor. Today, more than 72,000 Americans remain unaccounted-for from WW II.

  3. #663
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    Great Britain


    Cpl. Terry Webster

    From: Chester, England
    Age: 24
    Unit: 1st Battalion, The Mercian Regiment
    Died: June 4, 2010

    One of two British soldiers killed in a firefight with Taliban insurgents during a patrol in the Nahr-e Saraj region of Helmand province, Afghanistan.

  4. #664
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    Great Britain


    Lance Cpl. Alan Cochran

    From: St. Asaph, Wales
    Age: 23
    Unit: Company B, 1st Battalion, The Mercian Regiment
    Died: June 4, 2010

    One of two British soldiers killed during a firefight with Taliban insurgents in the Nahr-e Saraj area of Helmand province, Afghanistan.

  5. #665
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    Canada

    Sgt. Martin Goudreault

    From: Sudbury, Ontario
    Age: 35
    Unit: 1 Combat Engineer Regiment, assigned to 1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment Battle Group
    Died: June 6, 2010

    Killed after a roadside bomb detonated during a foot patrol in the Panjwayi district of Kandahar province, about 9.3 miles (15 km) southwest of Kandahar, Afghanistan.

  6. #666
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    Poland


    Sgt. Konrad Rygiel


    From: Poland
    Age: 28
    Unit: 2e Régiment étranger de Parachutistes, Légion étrangère (2nd Foreign Parachute Regiment, French Foreign Legion)
    Died: June 6, 2010

    Killed by a rocket during a firefight that began when Taliban insurgents attacked French soldiers providing medical aid to a village in Kapisa province, Afghanistan.

  7. #667
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    Australia


    Sapper Darren Smith

    From: Adelaide, Australia
    Age: 26
    Unit: 2nd Combat Engineer Regiment, assigned to 1st Mentoring Task Force
    Died: June 7, 2010

    One of two Australian soldiers killed when a roadside bomb detonated during a dismounted patrol in the Mirabad Valley region of Uruzgan province, Afghanistan. Smith's explosives detection dog, Herbie, also was killed.

  8. #668
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    Australia


    Sapper Jacob Moerland

    From: Cairns, Queensland
    Age: 21
    Unit: 2nd Combat Engineer Regiment, assigned to 1st Mentoring Task Force
    Died: June 7, 2010

    One of two Australian soldiers killed when a roadside bomb detonated during a dismounted patrol in the Mirabad Valley region of Uruzgan province, Afghanistan.

  9. #669
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    Great Britain


    Lance Bombardier Mark Chandler


    From: Nailsworth, Gloucestershire
    Age: 32
    Unit: 3rd Regiment, Royal Horse Artillery
    Died: June 8, 2010

    Killed in a small arms fire engagement with insurgent forces in the Nad 'Ali district of Helmand province, Afghanistan.

  10. #670
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    Great Britain

    Pvt. Jonathan Monk


    From: London, England
    Age: 25
    Unit: 2nd Battalion, The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment, attached to Company C, 1st Battalion, The Mercian Regiment
    Died: June 9, 2010

    Killed when a roadside bomb detonated in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand province, Afghanistan.

  11. #671
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    Bob Herbert's latest column from the NY Times -

    The Courage to Leave
    By BOB HERBERT

    There is no good news coming out of the depressing and endless war in Afghanistan. There once was merit to our incursion there, but that was long ago. Now we’re just going through the tragic motions, flailing at this and that, with no real strategy or decent end in sight.

    The U.S. doesn’t win wars anymore. We just funnel the stressed and underpaid troops in and out of the combat zones, while all the while showering taxpayer billions on the contractors and giant corporations that view the horrors of war as a heaven-sent bonanza. BP, as we’ve been told repeatedly recently, is one of the largest suppliers of fuel to the wartime U.S. military.

    Seven American soldiers were killed in Afghanistan on Monday but hardly anyone noticed. Far more concern is being expressed for the wildlife threatened by the oil gushing into the Gulf of Mexico than for the G.I.’s being blown up in the wilds of Afghanistan.

    Early this year, we were told that at long last the tide had turned in Afghanistan, that the biggest offensive of the war by American, British and Afghan troops was under way in Marja, a town in Helmand Province in the southern part of the country. The goal, as outlined by Gen. Stanley McChrystal, our senior military commander in Afghanistan, was to rout the Taliban and install a splendid new government that would be responsive to the people and beloved by them.

    That triumph would soon be followed by another military initiative in the much larger expanse of neighboring Kandahar Province. The Times’s Rod Nordland explained what was supposed to happen in a front-page article this week:

    “The goal that American planners originally outlined — often in briefings in which reporters agreed not to quote officials by name — emphasized the importance of a military offensive devised to bring all of the populous and Taliban-dominated south under effective control by the end of this summer. That would leave another year to consolidate gains before President Obama’s July 2011 deadline to begin withdrawing combat troops.”

    Forget about it. Commanders can’t even point to a clear-cut success in Marja. As for Kandahar, no one will even use the word “offensive” to describe the military operations there. The talk now is of moving ahead with civilian reconstruction projects, a “civilian surge,” as Mr. Nordland noted.

    What’s happening in Afghanistan is not only tragic, it’s embarrassing. The American troops will fight, but the Afghan troops who are supposed to be their allies are a lost cause. The government of President Hamid Karzai is breathtakingly corrupt and incompetent — and widely unpopular to boot. And now, as The Times’s Dexter Filkins is reporting, the erratic Mr. Karzai seems to be giving up hope that the U.S. can prevail in the war and is making nice with the Taliban.

    There is no overall game plan, no real strategy or coherent goals, to guide the fighting of U.S. forces. It’s just a mind-numbing, soul-chilling, body-destroying slog, month after month, year after pointless year. The 18-year-olds fighting (and, increasingly, dying) in Afghanistan now were just 9 or 10 when the World Trade Center and Pentagon were attacked in 2001.

    Americans have zoned out on this war. They don’t even want to think about it. They don’t want their taxes raised to pay for it, even as they say in poll after poll that they are worried about budget deficits. The vast majority do not want their sons or daughters anywhere near Afghanistan.

    Why in the world should the small percentage of the population that has volunteered for military service shoulder the entire burden of this hapless, endless effort? The truth is that top American officials do not believe the war can be won but do not know how to end it. So we get gibberish about empowering the unempowerable Afghan forces and rebuilding a hopelessly corrupt and incompetent civil society.

    Our government leaders keep mouthing platitudes about objectives that are not achievable, which is a form of deception that should be unacceptable in a free society.

    In announcing, during a speech at West Point in December, that 30,000 additional troops would be sent to Afghanistan, President Obama said: “As your commander in chief, I owe you a mission that is clearly defined and worthy of your service.”

    That clearly defined mission never materialized.

    Ultimately, the public is at fault for this catastrophe in Afghanistan, where more than 1,000 G.I.’s have now lost their lives. If we don’t have the courage as a people to fight and share in the sacrifices when our nation is at war, if we’re unwilling to seriously think about the war and hold our leaders accountable for the way it is conducted, if we’re not even willing to pay for it, then we should at least have the courage to pull our valiant forces out of it.
    source

  12. #672
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    In post #658, one of the men listed was
    1st Lt. Joel C. Gentz, 25, of Grass Lake, Mich.

    Here is an article from our local paper about him.

  13. #673
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    Today is June 13th.

    27 American troops have died since June 1st.

    Operation Enduring Freedom has become Operation Never Ending Death.

  14. #674
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    11 June 2010


    The Department of Defense announced today the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. They died June 11 at Forward Operating Base Bullard, Afghanistan, from wounds sustained when insurgents attacked their unit using an improvised explosive device. They were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 110th Infantry Regiment, Connellsville, Pa.

    Killed were:

    Sgt. 1st Class Robert J. Fike, 38, of Conneautville, Pa.

    Staff Sgt. Bryan A. Hoover, 29, of West Elizabeth, Pa.

  15. #675
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    11 June 2010


    The Department of Defense announced today the deaths of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    They died June 11 in Jalula, Iraq, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked their unit with a vehicle-borne improvised explosive device. They were assigned to the 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.

    Killed were:

    Sgt. Israel P. Obryan, 24, of Newbern, Tenn., and

    Spc. William C. Yauch, 23, of Batesville, Ark.

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