Thread: Politics and religion.

  1. #2566
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    Is Olbermann a Commentator or a Newscaster? I dont have a TV so I dont know.

    Either way its full on Carp that he be put on unpaid leave for his private actions away from work.

    If he was a Newscaster and as such endorsed Republican canidates I can see sacking him. If he was a Newscaster and as such endorsed Democrats I can see sacking him.

    If he was a commentator he can endorse anybody he dang well chooses and his bosses can go pound sand. If Olbermann is a commentator I hope he sues for wrongfull termination.

    A newscaster is still a private citizen and can donate his/her money and private time however they damn well choose, MSNBC is very out of line for this move. If the higher ups at MSNBC believed in freedom of speech Olbermann would still be at his job.

    Grace, do you understand the difference between a commentator and a newscaster?
    I have a HUGE SIG!!!!



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    Tyranny is defined as that which is legal for the government but illegal for the citizenry.

  2. #2567
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grace View Post
    If FOX had the same standards as MSNBC - why most all of their newscasters would be suspended.



    Keith Olbermann, the top anchor on MSNBC, was suspended on Friday after the channel discovered that he had made campaign contributions to three Democrats.

    The MSNBC president, Phil Griffin, issued a statement saying, “I became aware of Keith’s political contributions late last night. Mindful of NBC News policy and standards, I have suspended him indefinitely without pay.”




    Keith will be back with his show Tomorrow. (Tues). I guess they think a
    2 day suspension was enough to make their point. He sure had a lot of
    support from other broadcasters, both Liberal & Conservative.
    I've Been Boo'd

    I've been Frosted






    Men, it has been well said, think in herds. It will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one."
    — Charles Mackay, Scottish journalist, circa 1841

  3. #2568
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    Tomorrow, November 16th, Army Staff Sgt. Salvatore Giunta, 25, will become the first living recipient of the Medal of Honor from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

    He will receive the award for his actions in response to an ambush in Afghanistan's dangerous Korengal Valley on Oct. 25, 2007. Two U.S. soldiers were killed in the ambush and several others were wounded.

    Bob Herbert, of the NY Times, wrote a powerful piece about the Korengal Valley the other day.

    November 12, 2010
    Killing and Dying
    By BOB HERBERT

    Boston

    In the spring of 2007, American soldiers in the Second Platoon of Battle Company, part of a regiment in the 173rd Airborne Brigade, began a 15-month deployment in the Korengal Valley in eastern Afghanistan. It was one of the most dangerous places in the country.

    A feature-length film called “Restrepo” documents the soldiers’ experiences and captures the almost primeval elements — the living, breathing, killing and dying — of a combat tour with a close-up intensity that is, frankly, chilling.

    When the guys, many of them unbearably young, show up in the grim, mountainous, sparsely populated landscape, they react with what seems like a combination of awe and dread. One said his mind told him he would die there. Another wondered, “What are we doing here?”

    The film, which won the grand jury prize for an American documentary at the Sundance Film Festival this year, was made by Sebastian Junger, an author who wrote the “The Perfect Storm” in the 1990s, and Tim Hetherington, a British photographer. Junger also wrote a book about the Second Platoon’s tour called “War.”

    I interviewed Mr. Junger before an audience at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library here on Veterans Day, and he mentioned “how very nonpolitical” the soldiers were about the war. As they saw it, their job was simply to fight it.

    What stands out in both the film and the book, besides the mind-boggling dangers of combat, are the horrendous conditions these troops were forced to endure and the maddening ambiguities of their mission. They lived in filth, isolation and constant fear, which they almost always had to mask. And there was no coherent answer for the soldier who asked what they were doing there. He might as well have been asking the wind.

    Here, for example, is Capt. Dan Kearney of Battle Company, speaking in the film to a group of bearded elders from a nearby village:

    “You know, 5 or 10 years from now, the Korengal Valley will have a road going through it that’s paved and we can make more money, make you guys richer, make you guys more powerful. What I need, though, is I need you to join with the government, you know, provide us with that security — or help us provide you guys with that security — and I’ll flood this whole place with money and with projects and with health care and with everything.”

    Was that ever really going to happen? Was that kind of nation-building the ultimate goal of the incursion into the valley? And, if so, did it have any real connection to the attacks by Al Qaeda on Sept. 11, 2001?

    You both feel for and admire the troops cast into this pit of ambiguity. We watch them function in unison and with remarkable courage and poise when under enemy fire, and we watch them weep for comrades wounded and lost. We also see them fight without anger among themselves to help fill long, nerve-racking hours of boredom, and we watch them dance wildly to a favorite song.

    Restrepo is the name of a shabby outpost that the men built and then named for their friend, Pfc. Juan Restrepo, a 20-year-old medic and aspiring doctor who was shot and killed soon after they arrived in the valley.

    An environment in which the primary goals are to kill and to avoid being killed takes a psychological toll that is greater than most civilians realize. A soldier named Anderson told Junger, “I’ve only been here four months, and I can’t believe how messed up I already am. I went to the counselor and he asked if I smoked cigarettes and I told him no and he said, ‘Well, you may want to think about starting.’ ”

    Misha Pemble-Belkin, who was called Peanut Butter by his fellow soldiers, and then simply Butters, talked softly about trying to save a badly wounded colleague. “You could see it in his face that he’s slowly dying,” he said. “He was turning really ghost-looking. His eyes started sinking in his head, and he started to get real brown around his eyes. And he kept saying, ‘I’m getting really dizzy. I want to go to sleep.’ ”

    Pemble-Belkin used an expletive as he tried to explain how rough it was to watch one of his best friends die, essentially in his arms. At one point in the film, he described his reluctance to tell his family about his experiences: “When Restrepo got killed, it was a few days before my mom’s birthday, so I had to suck it up when I called my mom on her birthday and act like everything was O.K. and say, ‘Hey, Mom, happy birthday. Yeah, I’m doing real good out here. Everything’s fine.’ ”

    The film closes with the printed words, onscreen: “In late 2009, the U.S. military began withdrawing from the Korengal Valley.”

    source

  4. #2569
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    BTW - the Medal will presented at 2pm EST. C-SPAN will no doubt carry it. Maybe CNN, also.

  5. #2570
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    Medal of Honor presentation, 16 November 2010.


    http://www.whitehouse.gov/photos-and...lvatore-giunta

    Video lasts 23 minutes.

  6. #2571
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    I have been very tough on Nancy Pelosi for a while.




    Why stop now?


    I was LMAO when I saw a small clip of her being escorted with her Giant Gavel in hand.


    She reminded me of Granny out of the "home" for a walk around the block.
    Guys at her elbow guiding her down the street, She's all smiles to out in the sunshine, carrying her hammer and looking mighty happy about the whole thing-way too funny.

    Actually?

    It warmed the cockles of my heart.

  7. #2572
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    Quote Originally Posted by RICHARD View Post
    I have been very tough on Nancy Pelosi for a while.




    Why stop now?


    I was LMAO when I saw a small clip of her being escorted with her Giant Gavel in hand.


    She reminded me of Granny out of the "home" for a walk around the block.
    Guys at her elbow guiding her down the street, She's all smiles to out in the sunshine, carrying her hammer and looking mighty happy about the whole thing-way too funny.

    Actually?

    It warmed the cockles of my heart.

    Don't get too excited Richard, she isn't going very far. She's still likely
    to be the Leader for the Minority. (minority for now) She is far too
    valuable to lose permanently.
    I've Been Boo'd

    I've been Frosted






    Men, it has been well said, think in herds. It will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one."
    — Charles Mackay, Scottish journalist, circa 1841

  8. #2573
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    Quote Originally Posted by lizbud View Post
    Don't get too excited Richard, she isn't going very far..
    She can walk out into traffic for all I care.

    I was just happy to see her out and about and carrying that gavel.

    When my mom was in the hospital, there was a woman in the same facility with dementia that always had a baby/doll in her arms.

    As long as NP doesn't swing her hammer around, I wish her the best?

  9. #2574
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    Interesting -

    At least two new GOP House members now say they won’t enroll in congressional health care programs. Rep.-elect Bobby Schilling of Illinois told ABC’s “Topline”: “My family and I are bringing our own health care to Washington … Congress shouldn’t have anything better than the American people.” Another to-be member refusing congressional insurance is Rep.-elect Mike Kelly of Pennsylvania, who says “Why should my health care as a public official be any different than anybody else’s?” (Hat tip: POLITICO Pulse)

    The declarations come after another GOP Rep.-elect, Andy Harris of Maryland, stood up during freshman orientation this week and demanded to know why his government health care plan would take a month to kick in. Some Democrats are calling on Republicans pushing health-care repeal to forgo their own government health care plans out of principle.

    Should current and incoming members of Congress who opposed the health care reform bill turn down their government-provided health care?

    source

  10. #2575
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grace View Post
    Interesting -




    source


    I've been reading about the Rep. from Maryland and Olbermann had a
    spot about him on his show. What a jerk. Why can't he buy his own
    insurance like we do? With all the budject cutting ideas floating around,
    I have yet to hear about doing away with insurance & pensions for life,
    that all of Congress enjoy now.
    I've Been Boo'd

    I've been Frosted






    Men, it has been well said, think in herds. It will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one."
    — Charles Mackay, Scottish journalist, circa 1841

  11. #2576
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    Quote Originally Posted by RICHARD View Post
    I was just happy to see her out and about and carrying that gavel.

    As long as NP doesn't swing her hammer around, I wish her the best?
    She can keep her stupid gavel but she needs to give the jet back!!!!
    No matter what anyone does, someone some where will be offended some how!!!!
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  12. #2577
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    Quote Originally Posted by momoffuzzyfaces View Post
    She can keep her stupid gavel but she needs to give the jet back!!!!
    I hope they charge her for any extra mileage?

  13. #2578
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    I've always admired Barbara Bush for her frankness & her humor.

    http://www.theindychannel.com/politi...65/detail.html
    I've Been Boo'd

    I've been Frosted






    Men, it has been well said, think in herds. It will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one."
    — Charles Mackay, Scottish journalist, circa 1841

  14. #2579
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    A religion related question ... Sana posted about Eid al Ada (sp?) and I saw a story on the news last night, Lester Holt on NBC. I like him because he's from Chicago. He was with another NBC news reporter who speaks both languages and they were in the home of a family, father and mother and two daughters. They were introducing Lester to the traditional meal for the occasion and the father is a baker. He talked about wanting his daughters to attend college and have a better life than he has had. He served foods that he had baked. So, two questions: is Eid al Ada considered a holiday? I have Muslim co-workers- do I say "happy Eid" like I would "happy Thanksgiving"? By the way, one of my Muslim co-workers is looking forward to having her whole family over for Thanksgiving because it is a U.S. holiday and she is glad to be a citizen. Works for me
    Yikes! I've been Boo'd ... right off of the stage!
    Aaahh, I have been defrosted! Thank you, Bonny and Asiel!
    Brrrr, I've been Frosted! Thank you, Asiel and Pomtzu!


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  15. #2580
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    Quote Originally Posted by cassiesmom View Post
    A religion related question ... Sana posted about Eid al Ada (sp?) and I saw a story on the news last night, Lester Holt on NBC. I like him because he's from Chicago. He was with another NBC news reporter who speaks both languages and they were in the home of a family, father and mother and two daughters. They were introducing Lester to the traditional meal for the occasion and the father is a baker. He talked about wanting his daughters to attend college and have a better life than he has had. He served foods that he had baked. So, two questions: is Eid al Ada considered a holiday? I have Muslim co-workers- do I say "happy Eid" like I would "happy Thanksgiving"? By the way, one of my Muslim co-workers is looking forward to having her whole family over for Thanksgiving because it is a U.S. holiday and she is glad to be a citizen. Works for me

    Since there are two members here who are of that faith, why not PM
    them and ask "direct from the horse's mouth" so to speak?
    I've Been Boo'd

    I've been Frosted






    Men, it has been well said, think in herds. It will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one."
    — Charles Mackay, Scottish journalist, circa 1841

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