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Thread: Sherman #369 He is gone.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Aquidneck Island
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    Sherman #369 He is gone.

    Well, looks like we're going tro get to find a new vet immediately here in our new home. Sherman suddenly developed a cough about 2 days ago. It's very dry, nothing comes out, but he keeps hacking. His eyes have icky goobies, and I noticed some blood drops on the ground where he's been hacking. I looked up all the symptoms and it sounds like Kennel Cough. Odd, because I had him vaccinated against this for the first time with his shots last Dec. He's never had it before.

    I read that I can use an over-the-counter human cough supressent to try to give him some relief till we get into a vet. Any suggestions on what works well? I don't have any in the house, so I'll be going out to get some.

    What a bummer. He & Star were cooped up nose to nose in the car for a 16 hour drive, so I wouldn't be surprised if she gets it too. She had two days of digestive problems when we got here, and ate her first real meal last night. I have them seperated now, and am hoping we can get in somewhere first thing Monday morning.
    Last edited by cyber-sibes; 07-10-2007 at 09:50 PM.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by cyber-sibes

    Sherman suddenly developed a cough about 2 days ago.

    I read that I can use an over-the-counter human cough supressent
    to try to give him some relief till we get into a vet.
    Any suggestions on what works well?
    Poor Sherman!

    Here's some research:

    From: http://www.workingdogs.com/deboerken_cough.htm
    You'll have to *click* & *read* - has copy prevention on the article.

    From: http://www.k911.biz/Petsafety/DogCough.htm

    Persistent, hacking cough
    Sounds as if he has a bone lodged in his throat
    Retches after coughing, producing a white, foamy discharge
    Gags when highly excited
    If your dog displays any of the above symptoms, he may have what is known as "kennel cough". Kennel cough is a misnomer since the majority of dogs afflicted have not been in kennels at all but have been exposed to other dogs carrying the organisms which cause tracheobronchitis. The cough is brought on by an inflammation of the trachea (windpipe) and bronchi (the air passages to the lungs).

    Some dogs also develop conjunctivitis ("pink eye"), rhinitis (inflamed nasal mucous membrane), and a nasal discharge. A rough estimation is that 80 to 90% of the cases of kennel cough are usually caused by the bacteria, Bordetella bronchiseptica. The other 10 to 20% of cases are caused by a variety of other infectious agents, most of them viral. Kennel cough has been associated with Para influenza virus, adenovirus and canine distemper virus as well as the Bordetella bacteria.

    The virus is fairly contagious so if one dog has it, chances are all the others in the household will quickly become infected. In some dogs it can lead to pneumonia. The incubation period from the time a dog is exposed until clinical signs appear varies depending on which infectious agent is the cause. In general it appears to be about 3 to 5 days with Bordetella.

    Most cases of kennel cough are not serious, and will run the course on their own within two weeks. Some vets feel that it is best not to use antibiotics since it is almost always self limiting and the organism is a normal inhabitant of the upper airways. Treating with antibiotics could lead to resistance problems and the most serious complication like pneumonia, would be difficult to treat if it occurred.

    The uncomplicated form of the disease usually lasts for approximately ten days. Complicated kennel cough, usually a combination of virus and bacteria, should always be treated with antibiotics and may last 14-20 days. In mild cases, dogs will be alert and continue to eat normally. In more severe cases, a dog can become feverish, depressed, lethargic, expel a thick yellow or green nasal discharge, and possibly even develop pneumonia. Some very severe cases are fatal.

    If your dog has the uncomplicated form of kennel cough, your main objective would be to make him as comfortable as possible so he can give his esophagus a rest. Too much coughing and gagging could result in him spitting up small amounts of blood as a result of the constant irritation. To avoid this, a cough suppressant can be used. A children's cough suppressant is best, along with a CHILD'S dosage. Do not administer an adult dosage for your dog nor use adult medication.

    If you suspect your dog has kennel cough, keep all food, water bowls, and toys separate from your healthy dogs. Additionally, some pathogens that cause kennel cough can be transmitted from dog to dog via fomites (inanimate objects that carry disease-causing germs that spread infections. Fomites are one of the most common ways that kids get sick...dogs too!). After having contact with the infected dog, wash yourself and your clothes, and disinfect your shoes before coming into contact with your healthy dogs."
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    From: http://www.2ndchance.info/cough.htm Ron Hines DVM PhD 4/24/06

    Kennel Cough In Dogs:
    Kennel cough of dogs, also called infectious tracheobronchitis, is cause by the bacteria, Bordatella bronchiseptica. The signs of parainfluenza virus and Canine Adeno-2 virus can be indistinguishable from kennel cough and often the two or three organisms work in tandem along with mycoplasma to cause the cough.
    Soft dry coughs and sneezing are the two most common signs of this disease. They begin 3-7 days after the dog was exposed to another sick pet. Some dogs with this problem only cough when they are excited. Kennel cough is highly contagious and passes directly from dog to dog at kennels, grooming parlors, pet stores, doggy parks and humane societies. Dogs with this disease rarely feel ill although they may vomit food and foam due to enlarged tonsils and tracheal irritation. In healthy dogs, the cough lasts seven days to three weeks. But it can persist much longer in flat-faced breeds or dogs with narrow tracheas (windpipes).
    I have never seen a case of kennel cough that endangered a pet’s life. It is not clear that antibiotics speed recovery from this disease. But I place many dogs on antibiotics for a week or two, chiefly because owners are so annoyed by the constant racket. If the cough is not too severe I dispense a guaifenesin-based cough syrup. If guaifenesin is not sufficient to control the cough I put them on the narcotic cough suppressant, Hycodan. Humidifiers help clear mucous from the throat allowing the dog to breath easier.
    Dogs that are frequently exposed to other pets should receive a kennel cough vaccination every six to twelve months. The intranasal vaccine is more effective than injectable products. Vaccinating a dog the day it goes to the kennel is valueless – it takes a good week to ten days for the vaccine to protect.


    ------------------------------------------

    FEEL BETTER SOON, Sherm!!
    /s/ Cinder, Smokey & Heidi

    R.I.P. ~ Boots, Bowser, Sherman, & Snoopy

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    indianapolis,indiana usa
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    22,855
    I know how psycially draining it is to travel so far for humans & pups
    too. I think the hacking sound Sherman is making, hurts you more than it
    does him. I hope you can contact a Vet soon.Get well soon Sherman.
    I've Been Boo'd

    I've been Frosted






    Today is the oldest you've ever been, and the youngest you'll ever be again.

    Eleanor Roosevelt

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Northern Canada
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    5,533
    Make sure it's strictly a cough suppressant and treats no other symptoms. I can't remember which one we used when kennel cough went through here. Ask the pharmacist, they should be able to find the right stuff.

    Starr will likely get it. Raven got it first here and over the course of three weeks, every dog except two got it. Every dog for 100 miles around here had kennel cough that spring. It is an airborne virus so if your neighbors have dogs, they might get it too.

    The vaccine is like the human flu shot, effective only for specific strains. If the dog is exposed to a different strain, they will still get kennel cough.

    Hope Sherman is feeling better soon.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by cyber-sibes
    Well, looks like we're going tro get to find a new vet immediately here in our new home. Sherman suddenly developed a cough about 2 days ago. It's very dry, nothing comes out, but he keeps hacking. His eyes have icky goobies, and I noticed some blood drops on the ground where he's been hacking. I looked up all the symptoms and it sounds like Kennel Cough. Odd, because I had him vaccinated against this for the first time with his shots last Dec. He's never had it before.

    I read that I can use an over-the-counter human cough supressent to try to give him some relief till we get into a vet. Any suggestions on what works well? I don't have any in the house, so I'll be going out to get some.

    What a bummer. He & Star were cooped up nose to nose in the car for a 16 hour drive, so I wouldn't be surprised if she gets it too. She had two days of digestive problems when we got here, and ate her first real meal last night. I have them seperated now, and am hoping we can get in somewhere first thing Monday morning.
    Robutussin cough syrup- children's dosage can be used. Make absolutely sure it does not have Tylenol, or any other pain-fever reducers added in. Since there is alcohol in the syrup, the chances of you getting puppy to take it straight is very slim. Mix it in with a little milk to dilute the alcohol fumes up the nose, and add in a little honey.

    If your dog received the kennel cough shot, then it's only good for 6 months. The nasal vaccine is suppose to be good for 1 yr, but that assumes it was administered correctly, and the dog didn't sneaze 99% of it back out on the floor.

    If Sherman coughed any time during the car ride, or Star trotted over a coughed on surface, she has already been exposed. Then it comes down to whether her vaccination will protect her. If you mention to the Vet you suspect kennel cough, they will probably wisk you right into an exam room to keep their entry area clean. Faster service.

    Antibiotics make a dramatic difference in speeding recover. The Bordetella that quickly follow up the viral infection seem to be responsible for most of the symptoms. Usually 48 hrs after the start of antibiotics the dog is asymptomatic.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Thanks, all.
    He had the Bordetella injectible vaccine in January.
    I got him some Tussin and have given him a childrens dose twice now.
    I disinfected the water & food bowls, the rug he lays on, and sprayed Lysol on the carpet where he's been lying in the house. Poor guy, I know he's confused. He's standing under my window crying to come in, and it's raining. Boy do I feel like a crummy dog-mom, I wish he understood it's not that I don't want to let him in, but I can't.

    I hope we can find a vet who will see him early tomorrow. I was thinking that I would leave him in the car till they're ready to see him so he's not hacking all over the waiting room. Gosh, he sounds awful.
    Please keep my sweet boy in your thoughts.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    When my puppy had kennel cough, my vet strongly discouraged my from using any kind of cough medication. Sometimes, kennel cough can turn into pneumonia, and it can be a productive cough....you dont want to stop your dog from coughing nasty stuff out of its lungs.

    Sometimes, it can lead to secondary issues like conjunctivitis, and like I mentioned, pneumonia, which is not pretty at all. If your dog is coughing up blood droplets, I hope you were able to make it a vet appointment ASAP, because I have never heard of that with kennel cough before, and probably means it's somewhat severe.

    The problem with the bordatella vaccine is that there are SO many different bacteria that cause kennel cough, that it's impossible for the vaccine to protect against all of them. Antibiotics can help it go away faster, and prevent secondary infection, but every dog that I have known with kennel cough has taken weeks to clear up.

    Good luck!!


    Thank you Kay for the awesome siggy!!!

  8. #8
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    Sherman is on the road to recovery.
    It took a couple calls, but we found a vet's office that would take him at 10 am. They were very nice, and he's got anti-biotics and a cough supressant. He's been hacking his head off for 48 hours, but of course as soon as we walked into the vets, he didn't cough once.
    Found out that RI only honors a 3-yr. rabies shot for 2 years ( ), so he also got his rabies now instead of next winter, and a vaccination against lyme disease (they have lots of it here).
    He coughed again as soon as we got home, but I'm hoping by this evening it will subside. He can stay inside, too. Star's been exposed so if she gets it, she gets it They said some dogs appear to be carriers but not suffer from it themselves, so maybe she'll continue to be fine.
    Thanks for all your good thoughts.

  9. #9
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    Jul 2003
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    North East Ohio
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    My dearest Shermie.....
    I'm so sorry you've been coughin' but I'm glad to hear you're on your way to getting better! Make sure to take all your medicine!!

    Glad you all made it to your new home safely! What a crummie way to start out life in your new town huh?
    Guess you should have just stayed here in Ohio!

    Hope you don't give this icky stuff to your sister!!

    Smooches and tail wags...
    Yours always... Sierra.
    ~Angie, Sierra & Buddy
    **Don't breed or buy while shelter dogs die!**

    I suffer from multiple Shepherd syndrome



  10. #10
    Join Date
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    When Molly was sick with kennel cough as a pup, we gave her 1 1/2 tablespoons of plain yogurt everyday. It's a probiotic. I suggest giving it to Sherman to help his out his body.


    "Did you ever notice when you blow in a dog's face he gets mad at you?
    But when you take him in a car he sticks his head out the window." -- Steve Bluestone

  11. #11
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    Just seeing this now, sorry to hear about Sherman it must have made the trip even more nerve-wrecking than normal. As a true pet lover who is the first person you meet in your new town...the veterinarian, of course. I sure hope Mr. Sherman is feeling better soon, and that Star doesn't suffer any adverse reaction to being coughed on.

  12. #12
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    Oh Sherman, you did NOT get that ickingness here in RI; you got it at the dog park visit before you moved.

    Glad to hear that you are doing better!

    Pat, yah, it is a nuisance with the rabies shots. Mass. honors the 3 year, RI only 2. So I go to a vet in Mass, get the 3 year shot, and a certificate which says it is only good for 2 years. Go figure! Sugar came from Ohio, her documents showed the 3 years shot, but she is set up to get it again after 2 years. It just depends on the local laws.

    Now the cats, they were also getting the 3 year, valid for 2. But now my vet is giving Purevax, which is only tested and valid for ONE year. Oh joy. Next year, I get to have all NINE cats AND THE DOG in for rabies shots. (I had the cats staggered, half each year.) Now THAT should be an interesting vet visit! (Not to mention a bill!)
    I've been BOO'd!!
    Thank you Karen, for fixing my siggy!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freedom
    Oh Sherman, you did NOT get that ickingness here in RI; you got it at the dog park visit before you moved.
    Well, he may have also gotten it waiting in the vets office to get those daggers of his clipped off before we left. He's much much better today. Only heard one cough all night!

  14. #14
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    Oh great news that he is feeling better; and you are ALL getting some sleep!
    I've been BOO'd!!
    Thank you Karen, for fixing my siggy!

  15. #15
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    Jun 2007
    Location
    Singapore
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    my dog has the above symptoms for 2 years now

    vet says it's trachea collapse but x-rays show that the tracheas are in shape

    he doesn't cough blood but from time to time, especially when the weather changes, he will cough and retch badly and somtimes cough out white mucus.

    He coughs when excited and even when he drinks...

    I am thinking of getting a kids' cough syrup since the vet says let it be...

    other than that, my dog's health is very good and he's active and eating well for a 10 year-old shih tzu

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