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Thread: "Whenever" and "Seen"

  1. #106
    So what is correct? Through or thru? I thought thru was only used for "drive thru"? And what about tho, and though? Is tho just the shortcut for though?
    Fuzzies for Furries
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    2 Virginia Opossums, 6 cats, 4 bearded dragons, 1 iguana, 1 red foot tortoise, 1 tripod chihuahua, 5 mice, dubia and hissing cockroaches as well as other misc animals that wander in and out of my home.

  2. #107
    Quote Originally Posted by kokopup View Post
    Being a card carrying southerner I am guilty of using fixin and Y'all in my everyday speech. I have traveled all over the world and have found that there are MINOR differences all over the US. One that bugs me used by my daughter-in-law, a New Yorker, is "these ones". I don't think this is unique to her since I have heard this used in other parts of the US. For those critical of us southerner using y'all how about the use of "youse" or "youse Guys". I'll take y'all any day. Although there are some regional differences here in the US the use of slang is minimal here compared to the British Isles. You have to go to mainland Europe to hear proper English spoken y'all.
    My stepfather would correct me all the time when I said, "these ones". What would be the correct way of saying that? Just these?

    Also, how about allright? Is it alright, all right, or allright?
    Fuzzies for Furries
    Northwest Opossum Society
    Zoology Major
    2 Virginia Opossums, 6 cats, 4 bearded dragons, 1 iguana, 1 red foot tortoise, 1 tripod chihuahua, 5 mice, dubia and hissing cockroaches as well as other misc animals that wander in and out of my home.

  3. #108
    Quote Originally Posted by Catty1 View Post
    "wierd" is wrong; it's "weird". I know it sounds like the EE sound that the i makes should come first...but English is a crazy language with many parents. One can't assume anything about it!

    My mom and sister, who were very intelligent - Darcia skipped grades in school, my mom had two undergraduate degrees and a Master's...spelled it "wierd" for years. It was quite a good feeling to point this anomaly out to them...
    Yes! Finally someone who spells it correctly! "I before E except after C" isn't always correct.
    Fuzzies for Furries
    Northwest Opossum Society
    Zoology Major
    2 Virginia Opossums, 6 cats, 4 bearded dragons, 1 iguana, 1 red foot tortoise, 1 tripod chihuahua, 5 mice, dubia and hissing cockroaches as well as other misc animals that wander in and out of my home.

  4. #109
    Also, what about " and '...did I use those correctly? Gosh, this thread really makes you think!
    Fuzzies for Furries
    Northwest Opossum Society
    Zoology Major
    2 Virginia Opossums, 6 cats, 4 bearded dragons, 1 iguana, 1 red foot tortoise, 1 tripod chihuahua, 5 mice, dubia and hissing cockroaches as well as other misc animals that wander in and out of my home.

  5. #110
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    luckies4me
    So what is correct? Through or thru? I thought thru was only used for "drive thru"? And what about tho, and though? Is tho just the shortcut for though?
    I think that "Through" and "Though" are correct and Thru and Tho are informal shortened versions that have come into exceptance.


    Originally Posted by kokopup
    Being a card carrying southerner I am guilty of using fixin and Y'all in my everyday speech. I have traveled all over the world and have found that there are MINOR differences all over the US. One that bugs me used by my daughter-in-law, a New Yorker, is "these ones". I don't think this is unique to her since I have heard this used in other parts of the US. For those critical of us southerner using y'all how about the use of "youse" or "youse Guys". I'll take y'all any day. Although there are some regional differences here in the US the use of slang is minimal here compared to the British Isles. You have to go to mainland Europe to hear proper English spoken y'all.
    Instead of saying "these ones" you just say "these". I think saying "these", which is plural with "ones" which is really confusing because "one" is singular but you are making it plural by adding an "s". I think "ones" would qualify as an oxymoron.

    In my quote from above in addition to "Youse" and "youse guys", "you guys"
    is one I hear a lot especially out west.

  6. #111
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    Locals like to say they are 'fixin' to' do something. I always want to ask what they're 'fixin'.

  7. #112
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    Originally Posted by kokopup
    Being a card carrying southerner I am guilty of using fixin and Y'all in my everyday speech. I have traveled all over the world and have found that there are MINOR differences all over the US. One that bugs me used by my daughter-in-law, a New Yorker, is "these ones". I don't think this is unique to her since I have heard this used in other parts of the US. For those critical of us southerner using y'all how about the use of "youse" or "youse Guys". I'll take y'all any day. Although there are some regional differences here in the US the use of slang is minimal here compared to the British Isles. You have to go to mainland Europe to hear proper English spoken y'all.
    mruffruff Locals like to say they are 'fixin' to' do something. I always want to ask what they're 'fixin'.
    "Fixin is southern for About so I guess we are fixin "TO"

    I take it since you refer to the locals as THEY that you are what "they" refer to as a damn Yankee

  8. #113
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    Definitely! I've only been here 22 years

  9. #114
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    I had a first hand demonstration of how regional differences occur. I am from Birmingham, Alabama and in that area we refer to the green thing you use to water you lawn as a "hose pipe". I used this term once while in another area or the US and was laughed at because they quickly informed me that it was just a "hose".

    Years later I was renting a house in The Netherlands from a couple that originally came from Birmingham, England. We were reviewing an inventory of items to be left with the house. While reviewing the list all of a sudden I came across "hose Pipe" in the inventory. I chucked to my self and ask about the entry. It seems that's the way they say it there. Birmingham Alabama was settled by a lot of iron and steel people from Birmingham England.

  10. #115
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    I'm so glad to see this thread up again.

    I haven't read all the way through it so I'm probably repeating what I'm about to say but it's worth repeating.

    Lately I hear alot of people on tv, or otherwise, saying "fustrated" instead of "frustrated". What happened to the "r"???

    The other one that I see everywhere is "lose" and "loose" used in the wrong way.

    A person doesn't loose weight. A person loses weight.

    Did she loose weight? , is incorrect.
    Did she lose weight? , is correct.

    These two words are so widely misused these days, I wonder if someone set out to get the words changed in the dictionary.
    People from all levels of education and all walks of life, etc. are mixing up these words. Why???


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  11. #116
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    When it comes to the use of lose or loose I have to think about it because I think I have been guilty in the past and used loose when I should have used lose. I now use lost and moose to help me remember.

  12. #117
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    "at"....as in "where's it at?" "Where is it?" The "at" is useless, unnecessary and hurts my ears.
    When we said that as kids, Mama use to say "between the "A" and the "T" every single time we said it.. We soon learned to leave "at" off of the sentence.

    Special Needs Pets just leave bigger imprints on your heart!

  13. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edwina's Secretary View Post
    One other Chicagoese that annoyed me was "I am going by my mother's after work." I would always ask..."Do you wave?"
    Oh, my goodness - "going by there" is big in my extended family. Pronounced in true Chicago style - goin by dere. It's the answer to the question "Are you going to (place)?" Are you going to the bakery today? Yep, I'm goin by dere, what kin I bring ya?

    I was just thinking about this thread this morning! I have a plastic cup from Culver's restaurant - the slogan on it says "America's favorites made fresh". And every time I use it, I wonder ... shouldn't it be America's favorites, freshly made? I am so bad with adverbs!
    I've been Boo'd ... right off the stage!

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  14. #119
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    One that bugs me is "all right" morphing into "allright" or even "alright", but this could be language evolution (devolution?) in real time.

    There's another one but I had a brain f@rt and can't think of it!
    I've been finally defrosted by cassiesmom!
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  15. #120
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    smokey te elder
    One that bugs me is "all right" morphing into "allright" or even "alright", but this could be language evolution (devolution?) in real time.
    Although (another shortened phrase) alright is considered non-standard english it didn't just morph, since it has been in use since the 1880's. Although another non-standard has been in use since the 1400's. Altogether I would say they are pretty much a part of our language like it or not.

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