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Thread: What do you know about your favorite breed?

  1. #1

    What do you know about your favorite breed?

    Pick as many of your favorite dog breeds as you want and tell what you know about them, or some of what you know about them. Include a picture.


    The Neapolitan Mastiff -- The Neo is a powerful, strong looking dog. They are powerful, muscular and strong with a rather wrinkly face, but don't be fooled by the Neapolitan's mean expression, they're very loving dogs that are rather friendly and gentle. They were devoloped to look and act mean, but are extremely affectionate with family and family friends. These dogs are highly protective and not fearful at all, so burgalars beware! They are extremely intelligent and somewhat willfull. These dogs are usually very loving with children, but females are a better family pet while males are better guardians. They're great guard dogs for both properety and family and will give their lifes for their owners.


    Picardy Shepherd -- Most people know the Picardy Shepherd from the dog on "Winn Dixie", and they're a great dog to know! The Picardy Shepherd loves his owners dearly, but they are not fearful dogs at all. They will stand up to their enemies snarling and showing their white scissor-like teeth.


    The Pit Bull -- Some people imagine pit bulls as vicious monsters roaming the neighborhood for the taste of blood, but they are wrong. A loooong way from right. Pit Bulls are very loving dogs, and in history were trained to fight in the ring with other dogs, but never bite a human. Over the years, good breeders have made trustworthy and great dogs. What makes pit bulls bad, any dog actually, is either bad breeding or bad ownership. No dog is bad, but there are bad owners. They're happy, outgoing, stable, and friendly. Being highly protective over their owners, they're give their life for the people they love.

  2. #2
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    If I even slightly get started on what I know, I'd be here all night
    ♥Bri [HUMAN]♥
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    “Dream what you want to dream; go where you want to go; be what you want to be,
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Roxyluvsme13
    If I even slightly get started on what I know, I'd be here all night
    You don't have to right too much, just some stuff

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roxyluvsme13
    If I even slightly get started on what I know, I'd be here all night
    lol! Same here.


    "Did you ever notice when you blow in a dog's face he gets mad at you?
    But when you take him in a car he sticks his head out the window." -- Steve Bluestone

  5. #5
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    I'll definetly be back here to write my essay on GSDs LoL
    Ruled by:

    The GSDS: Addaxx and Fenyxx
    The Poodle thing: Frodo
    The Chihuahua: Stark

  6. #6
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    I'm only going to do one of my favourites for now, as I have to leave soon and when it comes to Tollers I always go on and on and on...not that I really mean to, it just happens...lol. I may or may not do my other two (Belgian & Mudi) later, we'll see.

    Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever:


    The NSDTR originated in and around Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia. They should have a thick, water repellent coat that is medium to long in length. A coat such as this does require consistant grooming. Tollers come in various shades of red and orange with white markings on the paws, chest, tail tip, and/or their face. Reguarding size, male Tollers are to be between 45-51lbs, and are 18-21 inches tall at the withers (19" being the ideal) with females being slightly smaller at 37-45lbs, and 17-20 inches tall at the withers (18" being the ideal). Tollers are not miniature Golden Retrievers as many people unfamiliar with the breed seem to think, nor were the originators of the breed trying to create a mini Golden. Tollers were bred to toll (which means lure) ducks and other water fowl within the hunters shooting range by playfully retrieving sticks at the waters edge. The birds were intrigued and curious at the sight of the Toller and swam closer to 'check the dog out' and see what it was all about. Tollers were bred to resemble that of a fox. The Toller is a very playful, high energy, active, outgoing, intelligent dog. They are always ready for action. Before the breed was deemed "Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever" the breed was called the "Little River Duck Dog" aswell as the "Yarmouth Toller". Tollers can be somewhat reserved around new people and tend to save most of their exuberance for family and close friends. Tollers do need to be socialized a lot when they're young, or they can become shy and unsure of new situations. I know a few who weren't socialized enough and they are now fear barkers and are capable of biting in new situations.

    The Toller needs something do. They require exercise (and lots of it!) every day, as well as mental stimulation. If this is not given, Tollers can and do find ways to entertain and amuse themselves. They can become barky and destructive if not given enough exercise and such. They are content to lay around on the couch when you feel like watching TV aswell, but that isn't something they like to do all day. Tollers love to work, they love to please. However, that being said, they do get bored if you repeatedly do the same thing over and over and over again and they thrive on learning new things. Tollers can also be pretty stubborn and often their intelligence can do more harm than good...they're almost too intelligent for their own good so you always need to be one step ahead of them. Owning a Toller is like having a 2 year old child for 12-14 years.

    Haha...I think that's enough for now, I didn't mean to sit down and write an essay about them but I know I am probably forgetting something..

  7. #7
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    Okay, well I'm going to write my essay now.

    THE MALTESE

    Puppy cut


    Show dog


    No one is really sure where the Maltese orginated from but they suspect an island off the coast of Italy called "Malta". Others, think they could be from Melita. Also people think maltese's were bred from a Spitz-type dog in Central Europe, but many say they are mixed with poodle and spaniel. Maltese's were orginally bred for hunting and were about three times larger then they are today, when they first orginated. It is thought that people bred these dogs to a smaller size and stopped using them as hunting dogs. English Crusaders returning home from Italy brought the breed to England. They became very popular in a short time, especially with women. They were dogs of royalty, and were carried around everywhere by the English women.

    Malteses are decended from one of the oldest dog breeds every recorded to exist. This dog breed is now 8,000 years old. This dog was called the "Melitaie dog". Statues of maltese's were found in Egyptians tombs and also found on Greek vases. Roman pholosiphers(sp?) wrote about them also.

    Okay, I really need to stop now. Sorry, this is so long but I research these dogs ALOT.
    Mikey - [Pug/Beagle Mix] Spock and T'Stala - [Hermit Crabs] Rest in Peace, Bo. I love you - [African Cawed Frog] Bo II - [Guppy] Buzz - [VT Male Betta] Chippewa - [BT Male Betta]
    "Never be ashamed of a scar. It simply means you were stronger than whatever tried to hurt you."

  8. #8
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    I probably forget loads but I do better when I am asked questions rather then trying to come up with things from the top of my head.



    History:
    originally there were differnt types of sheepdogs for differnt areas, all these dogs were known simpley as "colleys" the breed known today as the "Border Collie" originated in the border regions of scotland and england, the father of the breed is well known, Old Hemp. sheepdogs trials bagan when people started to argue over whos Colleys were the best, so so the trial was created, old Hemp was heads and tails above all the others because he had a unique style, while the rest of the dogs barked, old Hemp used whats known as the "eye" he crouched low and mezmerized the stock with his intense stare, this kepts the sheep calm and moving nicley rather then nervous and jumpy of the barking dogs, and like most legendary dogs he was used at stud..a LOT, so his working style got passed on and improved upon, however they were all over the map with what exactly they were good at, and that is when the even more famous Winston Cap came along, he is considered the father of the modern Border Collie, because rather then onlly being good at certain parts he was amazing at all aspects, Cap single handedly changed the face of the Border Collie, and is in 90% of the pedigrees of todays BCs.

    Appearnces:
    Border Collies are still primarly a working breed, and as such while there is a generalized look to BCs they come in a huge variety of looks, many of them people have no idea about. the size and build depends on the area, in my area nearly all BCs are small and lightly built, with longs legs and long narrow muzzles, others areas may be different.

    Coat-when most people think of a BC they think of a long coat, but in addition to rough coats they also come in smooth(which is the dominant gene) curly coated(not like a poodle but wavy), and wire coated(this comes from Turnbulls blue, a Beardie ROM'd as a BC, and runs through the blood of many BCs)

    Colour-most people see black and white right away, this is the classic colouring, however they also come in black tri, red tri, lilic and white, red and white, blue and white, sable, saddleback sable, brindle, blue merle, red merle, and patterned white.

    Eyes- eyes are usually brown , but are often blue or green in merles, and can also have black and white with blue eyes.

    Ears-pretty much anything goes, in shape they are usually medium medium sized and triangular but the way they are carried anything goes, many breed stanrads say they they are "usually" carried half perked(tipped), I know a lot of BCs and almost every one of them has either fully pricked ears or airplane ears(if the cartiladge did not fold in at one spot they would be fully pricked) they also often have mismatched ears.

    Temperment:
    the Border collie is considered the smarted breed in the world, and its no wonder, it even owneing BCs it never ceases to amaze me when I here stories bout BCs who have figered out answers to problems that not even I would have been able to come up with, like the one whos owner placed a moutrap on top of the garbage can, so the BC took its east favorite toy, placed it in the mouse trap, removed the trap(attached to the toy) and raided the garbage, as clear in the above story "smart" and "trainable" are very differnt lol BCs live to please there owners but they are also independent thinkers, thye had to be, they were bred to listen to the handlers but they were also bred to be able to think about what the hander said, assess weather or not its the right thing to do, and ignore the handers commands when needed, they needed to be ablke to do this in the blink of an eye, I dont know very many humanes that have the ability to make snap desisions and have it be the RIGHT one lol

    Energy:

    BCs are known for their energy, however every dog is differnt, and differnt BCs utilize this energy in differnt fashions. for example, Misty is extremly energentic and can go forever, but its because she stops to take 2 minuts power rests before she is worn out, this way she never truly runs out of energy. Happy on the other hand can go for hours, but then she crashes, its because she does not stop, she keeps on going till she collapses, but this means that she sleeps for longer peiods making her seem lazier then Misty, when really they have about equal energy levels.

    maybe I should stop now... lol
    Shayna
    Mom to:
    Misty-10 year old BC Happy-12 year old BC Electra-6 year old Toller Rusty- 9 year old JRT X Gem and Gypsy- 10 month ACD X's Toivo-8 year old pearl 'Tiel Marley- 3 year old whiteface Cinnamon pearl 'Tiel Jenny- the rescue bunny Peepers the Dwarf Hotot Miami- T. Marcianus

    "sister" to:

    Perky-13 year old mix Ripley-11 year old mix

    and the Prairie Clan Gerbils

  9. #9
    same here Cali..i could seriously write you all a novel on the Great Dane..i'll write some basic facts, history ect. later..feel free to ask any and all questions you might have about my heart breed, the Great Dane..i'll do my best to awnser them

  10. #10
    alright here i go..lmao..here are a few FAQs about the GREAT DANE, if you would like me to add a question, feel free to ask away!

    (This is "ROYAL DE LA BENJAMINE", he belongs to La Benjamine kennels in France. Royal would be considered a European "type" Great dane..more mastiff like in apperence, with a lot more bone than the American bred Dane.)

    Basic info?
    The Great Dane is a giant breed of dog, known as "the Apollo of all dog breeds". They are a giant, dignified dog of sweet and gentle nature but also of great power.

    What about colors?
    They come in 6 recognized colors, Fawn, Brindle, Harlequin, Mantle, Black, and Blue. Other colors include merle and white.

    How big do they get?
    Males can weigh anywhere from 130-190lbs and stand 33"-38"..and females typically weigh anywhere around 100-150lbs and stand 28"-35"

    History?
    The Great Dane was origanally developed in Germany to hunt wild boars. It is ssaid that the English Mastiff and Greyhound were used to develop the breed as we know it today.

    Whats their tempermant like?
    The Great Dane temperment is what most people find most appealing. They are extremly sweet natured, loyal dogs. They are wonderful with children. They can be the most majestic dogs one minute, and the next act like a complete clown. They make wonderful family dogs. While they, by nature, are not guard dogs, Most Danes will give a deep warning bark to any person (or creature) approaching the house.

    Whats their lifespan?
    Average for most any giant breed is 7-10 years..but there are always exceptions to that "rule". Also note that lovers of this breed will all agree, that they would rather spend 9 short years with this breed than 15 to 20 years with any other

    Any health issues?
    Yes Danes CAN have a number of problems..hip dysplasia, and bloat/GDV/torsion are primary concerns. Thyroid problems,Wobblers, and eyes problems can also appear in the breed.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cali
    I probably forget loads but I do better when I am asked questions rather then trying to come up with things from the top of my head.



    History:
    originally there were differnt types of sheepdogs for differnt areas, all these dogs were known simpley as "colleys" the breed known today as the "Border Collie" originated in the border regions of scotland and england, the father of the breed is well known, Old Hemp. sheepdogs trials bagan when people started to argue over whos Colleys were the best, so so the trial was created, old Hemp was heads and tails above all the others because he had a unique style, while the rest of the dogs barked, old Hemp used whats known as the "eye" he crouched low and mezmerized the stock with his intense stare, this kepts the sheep calm and moving nicley rather then nervous and jumpy of the barking dogs, and like most legendary dogs he was used at stud..a LOT, so his working style got passed on and improved upon, however they were all over the map with what exactly they were good at, and that is when the even more famous Winston Cap came along, he is considered the father of the modern Border Collie, because rather then onlly being good at certain parts he was amazing at all aspects, Cap single handedly changed the face of the Border Collie, and is in 90% of the pedigrees of todays BCs.

    Appearnces:
    Border Collies are still primarly a working breed, and as such while there is a generalized look to BCs they come in a huge variety of looks, many of them people have no idea about. the size and build depends on the area, in my area nearly all BCs are small and lightly built, with longs legs and long narrow muzzles, others areas may be different.

    Coat-when most people think of a BC they think of a long coat, but in addition to rough coats they also come in smooth(which is the dominant gene) curly coated(not like a poodle but wavy), and wire coated(this comes from Turnbulls blue, a Beardie ROM'd as a BC, and runs through the blood of many BCs)

    Colour-most people see black and white right away, this is the classic colouring, however they also come in black tri, red tri, lilic and white, red and white, blue and white, sable, saddleback sable, brindle, blue merle, red merle, and patterned white.

    Eyes- eyes are usually brown , but are often blue or green in merles, and can also have black and white with blue eyes.

    Ears-pretty much anything goes, in shape they are usually medium medium sized and triangular but the way they are carried anything goes, many breed stanrads say they they are "usually" carried half perked(tipped), I know a lot of BCs and almost every one of them has either fully pricked ears or airplane ears(if the cartiladge did not fold in at one spot they would be fully pricked) they also often have mismatched ears.

    Temperment:
    the Border collie is considered the smarted breed in the world, and its no wonder, it even owneing BCs it never ceases to amaze me when I here stories bout BCs who have figered out answers to problems that not even I would have been able to come up with, like the one whos owner placed a moutrap on top of the garbage can, so the BC took its east favorite toy, placed it in the mouse trap, removed the trap(attached to the toy) and raided the garbage, as clear in the above story "smart" and "trainable" are very differnt lol BCs live to please there owners but they are also independent thinkers, thye had to be, they were bred to listen to the handlers but they were also bred to be able to think about what the hander said, assess weather or not its the right thing to do, and ignore the handers commands when needed, they needed to be ablke to do this in the blink of an eye, I dont know very many humanes that have the ability to make snap desisions and have it be the RIGHT one lol

    Energy:

    BCs are known for their energy, however every dog is differnt, and differnt BCs utilize this energy in differnt fashions. for example, Misty is extremly energentic and can go forever, but its because she stops to take 2 minuts power rests before she is worn out, this way she never truly runs out of energy. Happy on the other hand can go for hours, but then she crashes, its because she does not stop, she keeps on going till she collapses, but this means that she sleeps for longer peiods making her seem lazier then Misty, when really they have about equal energy levels.

    maybe I should stop now... lol
    Don't get me wrong, I love my baby, I love all dogs but my fave is the BC, which I don't own. due to your description. Believe me, I wouldn't stand a chance. They're not only gorgeous, but WAY too smart for me. The outcome would be hysterical (for the dog)



    I've been Boooo'd!

  12. #12
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    Feb 2006
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    as for the Border Collie......

    Cali pretty much said it all!!

  13. #13
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    The DALMATIAN


    CLICK for Exeptional pictures worthy of representing this great breed


    BIS Am. Can. Ch. Merry go Round XKE~ one of my favorite dals

    The History of The Dalmatian (I wrote this for my website)

    The history of the Dalmatian is ancient and very jumbled. Different sources will send you through a new story each time. In writing this piece, I have used as many versions as I could get my hands on. I am most keen to beleive those individuals who have done the most research, including travels to personally talk with locals and historians of the regions key to the development of the breed.
    There is evidence of pointer shaped, spotted dogs throughout Europe before and especially during the middle ages. They have a strong tie to the gypsies, who were quick to grab the flashy animals as an addition to their street performances. Since the gypsies were nomadic, the dal was quickly dispersed throughout eastern and western Europe. When the keeping of dogs regained popularity they were used as sight hounds, scent hounds, bird dogs, and guard dogs for the carriages and horses from roadmen and thieves. Whatever they were used for, they have always had an affinity with horses. Type varied greatly throughout this time, and there is usually no mention of color. They were known first as the “Bengal Harrier” and were said to have come out of India from cross between a tiger and a dog. At that time, (16th and 17th centuries) spotted dogs used for hunting were quite common. Wether the dal originated from setters and spaniels of roan or belton marking is not yet verified, however, evidence points toward it. The first use of the name Dalmatian is in a 1700s translation of the French book Natural History. Liver, black, and tricolor were all prominent.
    Although many people still try to connect the breed to the Dalmatian coast of Yugoslavia, there is no information whatever of spotted dogs of any kind being indigenous to the region. One 17th century traveler to the region wrote of the mastiff and molloser dogs used for pulling carts, guarding, and sport, but he did not mention any spotted dogs. One would think if there were any spotted dogs such as a Dalmatian prototype, he would have commented on such an eccentric dog. It is unknown how it gained its name, perhaps by chance or by mistake. A man in Serbia, although originally from Dalmatia, who was known as Jurij Dalmatin imported some dogs and bred them, although no mention of color or spots is mentioned.
    Dalmatians were used as a symbol of the Roman Catholic church for years, so there is proof that the breed was already established in Italy in the 15th and 16th centuries.
    In its early years as a recognized and bred breed of dog it much resembled a pointer, although acted more like a flusher. In the 1700s, English gentlemen coming back from their tours of Europe that were so common around the time discoverd and brought them home. Most people tried to train them as pointers, and most dogs did poorly. It became fashionable to have one or usually two of these flashy dogs running underneath your coach just after the first axel. They made excelent guard dogs of the coach and luggage carried in it. In those days it was tradition to crop the entire leather of the ears. England is the birthplace of the current type of the Dalmatian as we know them today.

    Dals have been in the United States as long as the time of General and President George Washington, who kept them himself. They were also kept by the fire departments as mascotts and to run out in front of the horses and act as a modern day siren might, clearing the way, and also to calm and ease the horses during all the chaos.
    As automobiles were created, they went on to become circus performers, and companions, but their connections to the fire department remained.
    Copyright 2006

    Temperament
    Since historically the breed was used as a guard dog, they should technically be slightly reserved around new people, but quickly warm up to them when introduced by the owner as a welcome person. There is a big difference between being reserved and shyness, shyness is a major fault. This is becuase of a 20th century study of inherited coaching ability carried out using a large kennel that trained dogs for coaching. It was found that those indeviduals not suited for coaching were also majorly hand shy.
    Nowadays, many breeders are interperating the phrase, "Shyness is a major fault" to mean the dog should always be outgoing and welcome to any new people. IN my oppinion, a dal should be a good guard dog, not becomming overly exhuberant with a new person without first being introduced by a trusted human.

    Grooming/Shedding
    Do dals shed a lot? You bet! All year round. Even after daily brushing and sometimes even vaccuming their fur they will still shed a considerable amount so if you don't like hair, the dal is NOT for you. Each hair has a small barb on the end that seems to make sure it gets stuck in everything. Vaccuming a hairy surface won't always remove all the hair. If you have a labrador, expect a dal to shed more.
    Dalmatians have a fine, smooth coat. Daily grooming with a flea comb followed by a good rub down with a damp cloth should help ease the shedding. Dals do not need to be clipped, some are even shown unclipped. For show, if they have a bit of hair sticking out that is noticable in their profile it is usually trimmed off, and whiskers are shaved for show. Dew claws are almost always removed because dals have been known to repedily get them caught on things and rip them open. They will need their nails clipped regularly to keep them nice and short, promoting nice round and compact 'catlike' feet essential to good movement.

    Excersize/ Homelife
    Dals were bred to run 12-25 miles a day, therefore, they are capible of great endurance. My dal could run a few miles at a quick pace in the summer and come back barley panting. If you do not plan on running, biking, or riding a few miles a day then a dal is not for you. My neighbors have a John Deere AMT that they excersize their vizslas with at their farm in WI and I think that would be a great way for a dal to get excerize also. Many dals still train for and compete in Road Dog trials where a dog runs at hock to a horse for 12 or 25 miles over a day.
    Dals need to be inside dogs. If they are not a part of the family and being mentally stimulated they will easily become ditructive. They are very smart, but may not always want to please you. The also don't tollerate the cold well and may need a jacket in the winter.

    Health
    Dalmatians are generally a healthy breed. Most good breeders will x-ray for hip dysplasia and get a rating, although it is rarely a problem in dals.
    Deafness is a major problem, because before about 1987, there was no scientific way to test for deafness, so Dalmatians with hearing in only one ear (unilateral hearing) were often bred, carrying deafness to their offspring. Now, we have Brain stem Auditory Evoked Response testing, or BAER. Puppies are usually tested at 5-8 weeks old.
    The other major problem is bladder or urinary stones. Dals are the only breed that can not process purines which leads to high uridic acid levels, which leads to the formation of stones. Foods such as liver, beef, and anchovies are high in purines and should be moderately feed to dals.
    Since I know little about health, if you want more info, go to the Dal Club of America's website
    Last edited by Suki Wingy; 08-28-2006 at 02:55 PM.

    Niño & Eliza



  14. #14
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    Australian Shepherd

    Origin: Contrary to its name, the Australian Shepherd had its beginnings in Spain and Andorra, where it worked with the Basque shepherds. When the Basques followed the sheep-herding movement to Australia, the faithful dogs went along. Then, when Australian sheep were imported into the western U.S., once more the Basque herders and their dogs, now renamed as Australian Shepherds, made the trip. The breed has been popular with livestock people in North America for over a century.

    Temperament: Eager to please, loyal and responsive, the Aussie may be reserved toward strangers. Though a deliberate guardian, he is never hostile. Alert and quick to learn, he is easily trained. High-spirited, he can be tough with recalcitrant livestock but immediately soften to the tone of his owner's voice.

    Activity level: As might be imagined from his working background, this breed thrives on activity and needs regular outdoor exercise, as well as challenging tasks.

    Height/Weight: A medium-sized dog, the preferred height at the withers for an adult male is 20-23 in (51-58 cm). Females will be somewhat smaller.

    Coat: The coat is of medium texture, straight to slightly wavy and of moderate length. The breed carries a soft undercoat but the amount varies with the climate. Hair is short and smooth on the head, the front of the forelegs and below the hocks on the hind legs. There's a moderate mane and frill.

    Colour: This breed sports a rich variety of attractive colours. The Australian Shepherd may be blue merle, red merle, black, red - all with or without white markings and/or tan points.

    Grooming: The ideal coat is one of low maintenance but it's not maintenance free. Depending on the surroundings (burrs, mud, snow and other irritating conditions), it should be able to keep neat with regular brushing and the occasional bath.

    Border Collie
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Origin: The craft of tending flocks of sheep was introduced to the British by the Romans and it wasn't long before Celtic clans developed their own types of sheepdogs to tend to these tasks. One of these, the Border Collie, is recognized as the finest sheep-herding dog in the world. While appearance has been a major concern in many breeds, the working ability has always been the prime criterion in this breed.

    Temperament: Intelligence and trainability are a hallmark of the Border Collie. Alert and eager, the breed can display a single-mindedness for the task at hand. Affectionate with friends, the Border Collie may be reserved toward strangers. Instances of extreme shyness or aggressiveness are virtually unknown.

    Activity level: 'Highly active' only begins to describe the Border Collie. Swift, agile, tireless and with an incredible desire to work, the Border Collie is not for the couch-potato. This high-energy dog needs to work and if there are no sheep handy, it will thrive on such activities as flyball, agility, Frisbee-catching and advanced obedience.

    Height/Weight: A medium-sized dog, the height at the withers varies from 18-22 in (46-56 cm). The breed has strong but not excessive bone and should always have muscle and substance without appearing heavy.

    Coat: There are two varieties of coat in the Border Collie. The smooth coat is short over the entire body with some feathering on the forelegs and chest. The rough coat is medium to long and may be flat or slightly wavy. Both varieties carry a soft undercoat beneath the weather-resistant outer coat.

    Colour: The Border Collie comes in many colours and colour combinations. The most common is black with white markings on the collar, blaze, stockings and tail tip. However, dogs may be a solid colour (with the exception of all white), bi-colour, tri-colour, merle or sable.

    Grooming: Both coats are easy care and may be maintained with regular brushing.

    Newfoundland
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Origin: There are differing opinions on how the Newfoundland breed came about. Some believe the breed's progenitor was the Tibetan Mastiff, which may have migrated to both Newfoundland and Scandinavia. There are those who theorize Leif Ericsson brought the Viking 'bear dogs' with him when he arrived in Newfoundland in AD 1001 and they mated with the dogs of the Maritime Indians. There, the giant black dogs evolved in comparative isolation. During the 19th century, the breed became a European status symbol and at one time, Newfies were the most popular import to Great Britain. The breed was used to re-establish the Alpine rescue dogs at the Hospice of St. Bernard after their numbers were decimated by a distemper epidemic. In Britain, the black-and-white variety became known as the "Landseer" after the famous artist who featured the breed in his painting, A Distinguished Member of the Humane Society.

    Temperament: The Newfoundland's temperament is reflected in his soft expression. The breed is benevolent, intelligent and dignified but capable of fun. He is known for his gentleness and serenity. Generations of children have taken their first toddling steps holding on to this fantastic family dog.

    Activity level: The Newfoundland is an excellent swimmer with a strong life-saving instinct. There are hundreds of documented water rescues performed by this breed. The Newf has also been used as a draught dog and fisherman's helper. This easygoing dog loves the outdoors and country living, especially if he has access to water.

    Height/Weight: The average height for adults is 26-28 in (66-71 cm) and weight may be in the vicinity of 120-150 lb (54-67.5 kg).

    Coat: The Newf's coat was designed to aid him in water work. It is flat, dense and water-resistant, being somewhat oily. The outer coat is moderately long and straight. It may have a slight wave but no curl. The hair on the head, muzzle and ears is short and fine. There is a soft, dense undercoat.

    Colour: The traditional colour is black. White markings on the chest, toes and tip of tail are allowed. In the Landseer variety, the base colour is white with black markings. The preferred pattern is a black head, saddle, rump and upper tail.

    Grooming: The thick coat needs regular raking and brushing, especially during seasonal shedding.


    Maggy(Border Collie)Lacy(Australian Shepherd)Molly(Nefoundland Stormy(Border Collie)RB Anna(Siberian Husky)


    Rest Well My RB angels,Bandit and Anna

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    I finished my post

    Niño & Eliza



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