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Picklesmom
02-07-2006, 03:01 PM
I have a question about the safety of my cat having had two rabies shots. Rosie was given a shot by a vet in Oct. 2005. I took her to another vet last week for dental surgery. They ignored her paperwork and gave her another rabies shot. Can that hurt her at all? The vet of course said "No".

Jessika
02-07-2006, 05:49 PM
You know, I'm not sure, but I do want to say that getting two within six months isn't too good. I'm bumping your thread in hopes that someone else may be able to help you out!

TopCat3
02-09-2006, 06:51 AM
The question to ask yourself might be:
Did the vet give the shot for free out of the kindness of his heart to be on the safe side for dear little kitty, or did he charge you for it? My guess is he charged, and like a wounded bull.

I just read a letter in the current Australian Nexus magazine from a lady here who is concerned about the prevalence of over-vaccination in this country, (Australia). She cites a survey in which 89% (eightynine percent) of vets. said that dog and cat vaccinations were the number one contributor to practice turnover and 91% felt that a change from annual vaccination would have an adverse effect on their practice turnover. No wonder they send out annual reminders. The survey was carried out by Virbac, a major manufacturer of veterinary vaccines. The lady states that Virbac manufacture the vaccine that almost killed her dog and left her with lasting damage. She says had the vet. referred to the Australian Veterinary Association's Guidelines for the Responsible Use of Immunobiologicals in Cats and Dogs then her dog would never have been exposed to the risk. The lady approaced a vet. that works within the AVA who told her that the vaccination protocols in Australia are "very contentious" adding that "it is a major source of income versus the immunological need of the pet"

The lady is Pat Styles of K9 Vaccination concern in Perth WA and her website is www.freewebs.com/novaxx

Another lady in Sydney called Maria is setting up a little group of friends and like-minded individuals to try to break through the barriers and get more information and start lobbying within "the system". Her concern has been the confilicting information she has been receiving from so-called "experts" and the more questions she asks the more she has been sent on a merry-go-round chasing info, and she says it seems they are all too willing to sell you their product as long as you don't ask too many questions regarding its safety. She invites interested people to contact her by email. Please PM me if you want her email address.

The letters were written in response to an article in a previous issue of Nexus by Catherine O'Driscoll, about the over-vaccination of companion animals.

Previous articles can be accessed by going to www.nexusmagazine.com
I don't know if the vaccination one is on the website. You can also hear discussion on various articles in the magazine on www.RadioNexus.com.au
I don't know if the vaccination article is discussed. The magazine isn't confined to animals/pets, plenty of interest for everyone.

This is not an advertisement. I do not have any affiliation with this magazine, I just read it avidly every 2 months.

This is not meant to alarm you, Picklesmom, but forewarned is forearmed. You might want to seek a second, third or fourth opinion, maybe get her on some homoeopathics to re-balance her system/counteract any possible negative effects.

I wish you and Rosie well, the best of health.

TopCat3
02-09-2006, 06:59 AM
Oh just another thought.

Have the vet that did the dentistry confirm in writing that he said the second rabies shot in under six months will not have any adverse effect on your cat and tell him you will be taking legal action against his practice and his veterinary licence if anything happens to Rosie.

If he won't do it, well, there's your answer. If he didn't read her records and see that she had just been vaccinated, the phrase professional negligence springs to my mind.

I wouldn't let this rest, and I certainly wouldn't be paying him. If you scare him enough he might think twice before being so handy with the needle next time.

kimlovescats
02-09-2006, 11:44 AM
Why in the world would he "ignore" your recent paperwork???? That's ridiculous!! Was it a photocopy or something instead of the original certificate? Even so, all he had to do is call the place where you had his shot given in October!!!! Rabies shots CAN cause serious allergic reactions ... my Grace CAN NOT ever have another rabies shot ... per MY VET! The last one she had, she had an anaphylactic reaction and had to stay overnight at the clinic! I would do some serious checking into this situation! As it is, the law insists on them having rabies vaccinations on a yearly basis, even though the vet will admit they are good for 3 YEARS ... certainly only 3 MONTHS apart is way too much! I'm glad that your kitty didn't have a bad reaction! But that vet needs to be questioned for sure!
GOOD LUCK!

Craftlady
02-09-2006, 12:20 PM
Skinny got 2 rabie shots within couple months didnt bother him. Luckly the 2nd shot was a n/c. Vet tech at our new office wrote it down wrong that he hadnt had one, before we knew it shots were given again.

Kentucky Law is cat has to have 1 yr rabie shot, then after that the shots are every 3 years. Depending on your location more rural locations the vets do it every year. The 2 vets in our area do it on year basis.

Medusa
02-09-2006, 01:35 PM
I'm w/TopCat3 on this one. Any vet who ignores paperwork wouldn't be my vet after that and, if he charged you for the injection on top it, that's adding insult to injury, possibly real injury. I would definitely speak up to him, have him sign that paper so that you have recourse should anything happen to Rosie (hopefully, nothing will), and teach him that he can't be wielding that needle like a freakin' sword.

Blessings,
Mary

Lizzie
02-09-2006, 08:52 PM
My vet for 21 years, who has given me lots of free advice and a discount because he knows I rescue, has switched to an annual vaccine that they consider safer and far less likely to cause an adverse reaction. Having spoken to both the vets and the techs about the new vaccine, I do believe they are using it because they feel it is better for the animal. If your cat received the annual vaccine, I would feel far less concerned than if she was given the 3-year type. If it was the 3-year type, I'd follow up.

Killer Kitten
02-09-2006, 09:06 PM
The vaccine is pretty safe, and there should be no side effects for your cat. One of my kittens somehow grew an abscess on his neck (probably a roughhousing incident with the other kits) and since abscesses usually appear secondary to bite wounds my vet insisted upon re-vaccinating him, even though he'd just been vaccinated two months before.

My first shelter job was at a huge shelter that processed dozens of animals every week, plus did vax clinics, etc. Double vaccinating, while not something we encouraged, certainly did happen now and then. As far as I know nobody ever died of it. I think the margin for error in most vaccines is actually pretty high - in other words you'd need a lot more than one double-dosing incident to harm your cat. (Unless he has some untoward reaction/allergy to the vaccine, which is an entirely different story.)

Hope that helps!

TopCat3
02-10-2006, 07:57 AM
[QUOTE=Killer Kitten]The vaccine is pretty safe, and there should be no side effects for your cat. One of my kittens somehow grew an abscess on his neck (probably a roughhousing incident with the other kits) and since abscesses usually appear secondary to bite wounds my vet insisted upon re-vaccinating him, even though he'd just been vaccinated two months before.

If vaccines are so effective, why would it be deemed necessary to re-vaccinate within 2 months, I wonder?

It's a bit like mothers freaking out at schools because there is an unvaccinated kid in the class. If their kids have been vaccinated, what are they worried about?

Sorry if this appears like a personal attack on you, it isn't. I am just very cynical about the whole issue, for kids and animals, "they" sometimes seem to have "us" so indoctrinated and "they" put on a white coat and speak like God handing the tablets to Moses and "we'll" believe anything.

TopCat3
02-10-2006, 08:07 AM
My vet for 21 years, who has given me lots of free advice and a discount because he knows I rescue, has switched to an annual vaccine that they consider safer and far less likely to cause an adverse reaction. Having spoken to both the vets and the techs about the new vaccine, I do believe they are using it because they feel it is better for the animal. If your cat received the annual vaccine, I would feel far less concerned than if she was given the 3-year type. If it was the 3-year type, I'd follow up.


Did your vet explain what it was about the annual vaccine that made it safer than the three year vaccine, please Lizzie?
Does it contain thimerosal or not? and if it does is the amount it contains at least somewhat less than 1/3 of that contained in the 3-year vaccine? And is the amount per jab 1/3 of the price of the 3-year vaccine? I would hope so on the first count, or for me it wouldn't be a safer option, and being cynical (see above) if it didn't meet my criteria on the second count, I'd be mighty suspicious, but maybe that's just me.
I would trust a vet I had used for 21 years to speak their own personal truth to me as well, and they would probably trust a manufacturer to tell them their truth. I have just found that personal truths can sometimes differ from the facts.

Killer Kitten
02-10-2006, 12:20 PM
If vaccines are so effective, why would it be deemed necessary to re-vaccinate within 2 months, I wonder?

It's a bit like mothers freaking out at schools because there is an unvaccinated kid in the class. If their kids have been vaccinated, what are they worried about?

Sorry if this appears like a personal attack on you, it isn't. I am just very cynical about the whole issue, for kids and animals, "they" sometimes seem to have "us" so indoctrinated and "they" put on a white coat and speak like God handing the tablets to Moses and "we'll" believe anything.

I never said I thought it was effective to vaccinate, just that it was safe to double vaccinate, which is what the original post was asking.

Most vets will re-vaccinate an animal that comes in with a bite wound, even if both biter and bitee are vaccinated indoor cats. It's the theory of CYA.

At the Animal League - and at the zoo - we always vaccinated with Imrab. The zoo vets liked it because it was safe to use even in exiotic mammals that it wasn't specifically labeled for, and because it could go either IM or SQ. As to whether or not it actually prevented an animal from contracting rabies... we never had an exposure so we never got a chance to test its efficacy.

A lot of veterinary medicine, especially in areas of zoonotic diseases like rabies, is about covering your butt. Since it is safe for the animal to vaccinate redundantly, it's best to revaccinate. It won't hurt the pet and it might just be the little extra that prevents a tragedy. Since getting another rabies shot did no harm to Itchy it didn't bother me that he got one, redundant as it was.

Another good reason to vaccinate for rabies: An unvaccinated animal that has a rabies exposure is generally euthanized immediately to prevent the spread of the disease. A vaccinated animal in the same situation can be quarantined until after the incubation period is up, then returned to the owner. If vaccinating will save my pet from being euthanized, I'm vaccinating.

TopCat3
02-10-2006, 07:52 PM
I never said I thought it was effective to vaccinate, just that it was safe to double vaccinate, which is what the original post was asking.

Most vets will re-vaccinate an animal that comes in with a bite wound, even if both biter and bitee are vaccinated indoor cats. It's the theory of CYA.

At the Animal League - and at the zoo - we always vaccinated with Imrab. The zoo vets liked it because it was safe to use even in exiotic mammals that it wasn't specifically labeled for, and because it could go either IM or SQ. As to whether or not it actually prevented an animal from contracting rabies... we never had an exposure so we never got a chance to test its efficacy.

A lot of veterinary medicine, especially in areas of zoonotic diseases like rabies, is about covering your butt. Since it is safe for the animal to vaccinate redundantly, it's best to revaccinate. It won't hurt the pet and it might just be the little extra that prevents a tragedy. Since getting another rabies shot did no harm to Itchy it didn't bother me that he got one, redundant as it was.

Another good reason to vaccinate for rabies: An unvaccinated animal that has a rabies exposure is generally euthanized immediately to prevent the spread of the disease. A vaccinated animal in the same situation can be quarantined until after the incubation period is up, then returned to the owner. If vaccinating will save my pet from being euthanized, I'm vaccinating.

Yes I can see your point - your last remark sums it all up, if you would otherwise lose your pet to euthanasia anyway, why wouldn't you revaccinate. I absolutely agree. And rabies, I must admit, is a whole different kettle of fish. Having lived in two countries where rabies is not an issue, (England and now Australia) I have not had to factor it into the vaccination equation, I guess I am fortunate there. I still think with regard to other diseases in companion animals and in humans, the whole vaccination controversy is a hot subject and very worrying, and emotions can run high.I lost a cat to a very aggressive cancer that began around a vaccination site so I am biased. My comments are not meant to slag anyone off, only to point to sources of info and points for consideration. Thanks everyone :)

Killer Kitten
02-10-2006, 10:49 PM
Yes I can see your point - your last remark sums it all up, if you would otherwise lose your pet to euthanasia anyway, why wouldn't you revaccinate. I absolutely agree. And rabies, I must admit, is a whole different kettle of fish. Having lived in two countries where rabies is not an issue, (England and now Australia) I have not had to factor it into the vaccination equation, I guess I am fortunate there. I still think with regard to other diseases in companion animals and in humans, the whole vaccination controversy is a hot subject and very worrying, and emotions can run high.I lost a cat to a very aggressive cancer that began around a vaccination site so I am biased. My comments are not meant to slag anyone off, only to point to sources of info and points for consideration. Thanks everyone :)

I lost my Kitt to vaccine induced osteosarcoma, so I completely understand where you're coming from. In fact, the only thing I do vaccinate my cats for is rabies.

I was a zoo vet tech for ten years, and the one thing that was sure to make the hair on our vets heads stand up was anything to do with rabies. There was no joking or leeway on this matter. I guess that attitude towards rabies and vaccinating for it has kind of rubbed off on me, which makes sense. If you get rabies, you die. No exceptions, no cure. So it pays to be over cautious.