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View Full Version : They can euthanize animals, What about humans?



Kfamr
06-24-2003, 05:30 AM
My mom brought this up while I was talking to her about Pet Talk this morning, We were talking about some of the subjects brought up in here, and she said this may make an interesting one.


They've euthanized many animals who have lost "the quality of life" But, why not humans? They say it's the humane way to do things when it comes to animals. I forgot his name, Don't even know how to spell it for that matter, But, my mother brought up a Doctor that is in jail now for euthanizing humans upon their request.
I think it is allright, as long as they request it. Not doing so leads to many Suicidal Murders.

What do you think about this subject?

No bashing others please.:)

Fuzzy317
06-24-2003, 05:44 AM
You are talking about Dr. Jack Kevorkian. I think there is a place in humanity for his "service". I see someone's choosing to end their life (with a waiting period to be sure) not much different than taking someone off life support.

Kfamr
06-24-2003, 05:46 AM
Yeah, That's his name. Thanks, lol.

Kfamr
06-24-2003, 10:27 AM
Lut ~ I'm sorry about your brother-in-law. It must be hard for your family to see him in pain. :( {{{HUGS}}}
As for your mother and father... My grandfather is 86 or 87, he's completely healthy, probably healthier than me.


I'm talking about euthanizing people that wish to be, or people such as your brother-in-law that are in complete pain.


How this subject all came up between my mother in I.. We were talking about my cousin going to college and talking about what she wanted to do when she got out. I said I wanted to be a Vet but could NEVER euthanize an animal, but i could euthanize a Human ;x
Lol, I guess that's kind of harsh, but I find my animals much more important to me.

If i was in complete pain, i'd definatly want to be euthanized.

moosmom
06-24-2003, 11:19 AM
My Mom had lung/brain cancer at the age of 44. She was in SO much pain that my father had to give her morphine shots. She went through chemotherapy, lost the sight in her left eye and eventually was confined to a wheelchair. This was a woman who at one time was so full of life. I only wish Dr. Kevorkian was around back in 1973.

I truly believe in human euthanization. But...there has to be absolutely, positively NO DOUBT that there is no way the person's life will ever improve and go back to the way it was before the disease and that whatever the disease they have is terminal.

I've told my friends and family that if I ever get so bad that I just sit in a chair or bed, drool and have to be fed, bathed and diapered, then please put me out of my misery.

Jack Kevorkian is my hero and I always supported and still do support his work. No one, and I mean NO ONE has the right to tell me whether or not I have the right to end my own life.

primabella
06-24-2003, 11:37 AM
Euthanization of humans? Would that also be like the death penalty? I don't know how to explain it well, but let's say a pitbull or rottie 'attacks' and they put it to sleep because he's such a danger in society. Would it be the same thing like if a man were to bomb a place and kill thousands of people, so they give him the death penalty? The death penalty is a touchy subkect and I don't know if I agree with it or not.

If someone is in pain and can't take it anymore, then yes, I think euthanization would be alright. But then there's always the religious side that says olny God has the right to take your life. I don't know. I guess I can say I agree with it with some limits in mind. Did that make sense? lol I'm a bit confused. Maybe I need to hear a few more points in this discussion...

catland
06-24-2003, 11:44 AM
We have it here in Oregon. A terminally ill person can legally get a lethal prescription of barbituates. The catch however, is that they have to administer the lethal dose themselves, the doctor doesn't do it.

We got this new law through a measure that the people voted on. Then our state legislature got nervous and made us vote on it again. This made the voting public so mad that the second time we passed the ballot measure by an even larger number.

Current research shows that a log of the people who choose to get a prescription never use it, but it gives them a sense of control in their lives.

iceyshiver21
06-24-2003, 12:24 PM
Originally posted by catland

Current research shows that a log of the people who choose to get a prescription never use it, but it gives them a sense of control in their lives.
Thats the part I'm afraid of...it different when somebody else does it because you have a second opinion and time to cool down if your one of those who get in a fight and think that life cant go on...or maybe just depressed that can be cured but do they think so?
I think that euthanization is fine but they so consult others, even if in extrem pain, before hand...Im sure if it is a extreme pain case they will want to say good bye to everyone anyway..

catland
06-24-2003, 12:59 PM
Originally posted by iceyshiver21
Thats the part I'm afraid of...it different when somebody else does it because you have a second opinion and time to cool down if your one of those who get in a fight and think that life cant go on...or maybe just depressed that can be cured but do they think so?
I think that euthanization is fine but they so consult others, even if in extrem pain, before hand...Im sure if it is a extreme pain case they will want to say good bye to everyone anyway..

I don't know all the details, but I do know that they were very careful in constructing the rules. A person needs to see a psychiatrist or psychologist to determine that they are mentally fit and not suffering from depression. They have to be resident of this state, so a person can't just move in from another state to get the prescription. They have to have been diagnosed as having less than six months to live. They have to be coherent and mentally sound to make the decision themselves without coersion. The person must be 18 years or older (in fact, the latest report says that the median age of people was 69, many were college educated, and most had cancer)

this link can help answer any other questions that you may have.
http://www.ohd.hr.state.or.us/chs/pas/pas.cfm

iceyshiver21
06-24-2003, 01:04 PM
Ok...That sounds alot better and the site did ansure alot of questions I had. I thought that almost anyone could get it...at first.

emily_the_spoiled
06-24-2003, 02:45 PM
Holland is the only other country in the world that permits euthanasia, so Oregan isn't the first place. But from a personal view point, I used to work in a hospital for many years and it was very difficult to watch my patients go through the motions of receiving treatment (similar to Lut's brother-in-law), and they knew there was no relief for them. I hope that when my time comes I will have the option of euthanasia.

carole
06-28-2003, 04:01 AM
Well i have to say i wish it was legal in New Zealand, maybe in time it will be, i have a very horrible hereditary disease in my family, and if i should be so unlucky to get it, i most certainly want my life to be ended, i donot want to go on for ten years or so, not knowing anyone, and not having any dignity of life, if its not legal then, i will most certainly take the situation into my own hands before i become too bad.

KYS
06-28-2003, 11:02 AM
This is a very touchy subject especially in religious views.
So I will put my religious thinking aside.

Though I have very mixed torn feelings,
I also believe in human euthanization, but for only certain circumstances.
Thier has to be no longer a quality of life nor hope
for the person could get better.
IF the person is dying and suffering, why prolong the
suffering more?
My mother suffered from Cancer.
But the last month of her life was horrible for her.
I think it would have been
much kinder to let her go peacefully towards the end.
Instead she was so full of morphine and she died
in a hospital bed.

CathyBogart
06-29-2003, 01:45 AM
I'm going to add another "YES" for euthanasia when there is no hope of restoring a quality life for a person. I've never known anyone in such a situation personally, but it hurts to even imagine watching someone linger like that.

...Funny how nobody's disagreed so far. This seems to be the concensus everywhere that this is brought up.

Crikit
06-29-2003, 09:40 PM
A friend of mine who's a nurse in the nero ward at one of the hospitals here acutally asked me and a couple of other friends a question like this when we were out for supper a few weeks ago. Her question was "If your best friend was terminally ill and they asked you for your help would you help them?"

At the time I didn't know what to answer because well to be perfectly honest my best friend sometimes has the tendency to be a little flightly (she even says that at times) but now after being given some time to think about it I think I would.

If someone I love is in so much pain that it hurts to live then yes I would help them in anyway possible, even if it's just being in the room while they did everything themselves. When I was in jr high my aunt died of cancer and it was very painful at the end for her, so painful that she was on pain meds 24/7 until the day she died. If it was legal and the option presented itself I'm sure a few people in my family would have helped her end the pain if they could have.

But I would only do it if it was something that they couldn't cure, something that wouldn't get better.

Airedalekisses
07-14-2003, 01:33 PM
There was a story on 60 minutes about euthanasia in the Netherlands-very informative-they don't have a problem with suicidal murders or bumping mom off to get the inheritance. It's very humane and done with dignity-they deal with babies born with horrible incurable or irrepairable birth defects-the quality of life is determined by number from 1-10 and no one who has a thread of hope is ever euthanised. Also just because someone is old-no reason to "put them to sleep". I think the Hemlock society(assisted suicide) is also informative-they hate to see anyone suffer-very compassionate people!